Examples: Monday, today, last week, Mar 26, 3/26/04
Welcome home! Please contact lincoln@newbuddhist.com if you have any difficulty logging in or using the site. New registrations must be manually approved which may take up to 48 hours. Can't log in? Try clearing your browser's cookies.

Recommended Reading

13567

Comments

  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator
    edited March 2006
    Lovely to meet you, SoL... welcome to our forum....

    Thank you for the book recommendations too... ;)
  • edited March 2006
    i am a life long catholic, but have thought for a while that i have an inner buddhist waiting to come out... i just finished a drug therapy program that has made me want to grasp discipline and turn my life in a new direction, and I would like to begin with trying to learn Buddhism... i looked over this thread and came up with a list of 3 books that i think would be good for me to start with, and was hoping that those of you with a little more knowledge could critique for me... good choices? should i start with something a little less heavy? another book that you think i should add on? whatever it may be, im open to any suggestions...

    "Living Buddha, Living Christ" by Thich Naht Hahn
    "The Heart of Buddha's Teaching" by Thich Naht Hahn
    "The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying" by Sogyal Rinpoche
  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator
    edited March 2006
    Chriska, Welcome to you....

    first of all thank you for being so frank about yourself.

    Those are good book choices, so you've picked some good ones there.

    Secondly, rest assured that nobodyhere will attempt to perduade you one way or the other... you choose and decide what you choose and decide....
    Thirdly, as an ex-Catholic I understand where you're coming from. But that's my choice of practise and mode of living....

    Nice to meet you!
  • BrigidBrigid Veteran
    edited March 2006
    Welcome, Chriskra! Nice to see you.

    Those are great choices.

    I'd also like to add anything by Thubten Chodron or Pema Chodron, both very easy to read and understand for Westerners and both very good teachers.

    I like His Holiness the Dalai Lama a lot because I'm still in the beginning stage and he writes for the widest audience, and not always to Buddhists alone. I struggle with the understanding of emptiness and other esoteric things and he explains them very simply, or as simply as they can be explained. I still don't understand them but as least he doesn't frustrate me when he writes about them.

    I hope you find this site as helpful as I have and please make yourself at home. Don't be shy to ask questions and speak up if you don't understand or agree with something.

    Much metta,

    Brigid
  • edited March 2006
    thanks guys? any particular order u think i should read them in?
  • edited March 2006
    The Heart of the Buddha's teaching first perhaps.
  • edited April 2006
    Student Of Life and Chriskra,

    The book "Buddhism For Beginners" by Thubten Chodron was the first one I read. It helped a ton in answering questions that I had right off the bat. I came here and started asking questions and everyone has been helpful, and still help me out alot. Besides a few other books ("A Path With Heart" by Jack Kornfield, "The Teachings Of The Buddha" by Chang Hsing) and a couple sutras ("The Sutra On The Eight Realizations Of The Great Being" translated by Thich Nhat Hahn), I am currently reading "The Miracle Of Midfulness" by Thich Naht Hhan. It's a great book and has some great ideas and recommendations to help in meditation, which I could sure use help with! Welcome to the site, you'll find everyone here really helpful, I sure as heck love this place! :)
  • BrigidBrigid Veteran
    edited April 2006
    Me, too.
  • edited May 2006
    Some good reading.

    "Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism"- Chgyam Trunpa
    "Being Nobody, Going Nowhere"- Ayya Khema
    "Zen Master Class"- Stephen Hodge

    Any TN Hahn

    Also, emptying the mind, not reading is good too!! ;)
  • edited May 2006
    mm im getting to the end of *the heart of the buddha's teachings..*

    i dont really wanna read about the same stuff again in another context.. and i dont want a book thats hard to understand. .

    any advice on where to go to next?
  • edited July 2006
    Thank you for the book choices you were given to read. I have started on the Heart of Buddha's teachings.

    I am new to the site in the sense that I joined last year and then kind of lost my way. I call myself a Buddhist in the sense that I know it is the path that makes the most sense for me but I understand that I barely know anything about it to be considered one by those who are much more knowledgeable.

    Welcome to the site and I hope to have more of a presence here than I have had in the past. Many apologies to all...
    Casthinker.gif

    sorry.gif
  • JerbearJerbear Veteran
    edited July 2006
    What did you find most interesting in "Heart of the Buddha's Teaching"? A real short one by TNH is "Miracle of Mindfulness" about meditation. But there are all kinds of things out there so what interests you?
  • edited July 2006
    Celebrin wrote:
    mm im getting to the end of *the heart of the buddha's teachings..*

    i dont really wanna read about the same stuff again in another context.. and i dont want a book thats hard to understand. .

    any advice on where to go to next?


    ++Lite Fare: "24/7 Zen" --Philip Tusho Sudo
    nice for daily dhamma reading

    ++Brief passages with depth:

    "Thich Naht Hahn: Essential Writings" --from Orbit Press

    ++Also Brief passages with contemporary applications:
    "Buddhism Without Beliefs- A Contemporary Guide To Enlightenment "--Stephen Batchelor

    ++ Practical Situational Knowledge:
    "Waking Up To What You Do- A Zen Practice for Meeting Every Situation with Intelligence and Compassion" --Diane Eshin Rizzetto

    Sutras
    The Surangama Sutra
    http://www.buddhanet.net/pdf_file/surangama.pdf

    Heart and Diamond Sutras
    http://www.worldzen.org/sutras01.php

    Also

    http://www.plumvillage.org/MindfulnessTrainings/MTTrainingInfo.htm

    When finish those I have more.....:type:

    May peace find you where you are.
    Steve
  • edited July 2006
    Casthinker wrote:
    Thank you for the book choices you were given to read. I have started on the Heart of Buddha's teachings.

    I am new to the site in the sense that I joined last year and then kind of lost my way. I call myself a Buddhist in the sense that I know it is the path that makes the most sense for me but I understand that I barely know anything about it to be considered one by those who are much more knowledgeable.

    Welcome to the site and I hope to have more of a presence here than I have had in the past. Many apologies to all..

    Welcome, glad you stopped by. I'm up to chapter 15 in that book myself. Hope to hear more from you soon!!
  • BrigidBrigid Veteran
    edited July 2006
    Hi, Casthinker. Welcome back!

    I've read The Miracle of Mindfulness by TNH and loved it. It's beautiful. I haven't read The Heart of the Buddha's Teachings yet. I will someday though. Just gotta finish the 5 books I already have on the go. lol! There's a lot to read but luckily most of it is a sheer pleasure.
    Enjoy your studies!
  • JerbearJerbear Veteran
    edited July 2006
    FIVE? ONLY FIVE? YOU SLACKER! Actually I'm the slacker my stack keeps getting taller and taller and I only seem to want to play chess, listen to metal music and hang out on line. And I'm really okay with that right now.
  • edited September 2006
    Well to all I am still tring to get back in to the reading. I wish there were a Buddhist temple nearby to go to. I know I would like the interaction better live than in reading.

    There is one that is supposed to be close but the sermons are all in a foreign language and the monks do not speak much English so I doubt I would get much from it.

    I guess I will have to keep seeking until I find one....
  • XraymanXrayman Veteran
    edited September 2006
    The temple I attend is a Tibetan Buddhist type. The bloke in charge is almost impossible to understand with his broken english, however I seem to get the message when he speaks.

    Xrayman
  • edited September 2006
    Casthinker wrote:
    Well to all I am still tring to get back in to the reading. I wish there were a Buddhist temple nearby to go to. I know I would like the interaction better live than in reading.

    There is one that is supposed to be close but the sermons are all in a foreign language and the monks do not speak much English so I doubt I would get much from it.

    I guess I will have to keep seeking until I find one....

    Possibly, you might be able to find some Dhamma talks on cassette/ CD.

    That was my formal introduction to Buddhism ( Tich Naht Hahn's --" The Present Moment- A Retreat in Mindfullness" 6 cassette set).

    Best of luck to you.
  • edited October 2006
    I have a quick question, forgive me if this was already posted I gave the room a quick glance. So please dont beat me up to bad if Im bringing up an old subject.

    I'm looking for any information on mantras. Such as translations, origins, and meanings. I know there is a lot on the web but I would rather have a good book to read then someones false website. Also if anyone knows any cd's of chants or mantras that would also be a great help.

    Thank you for your time.
  • PalzangPalzang Veteran
    edited October 2006
    Maybe it was asked before, but who cares? It never hurts to go over it again.

    First of all, I should explain that the meaning of a particular mantra is unimportant actually. The power of a mantra comes in its ability to have an effect on the winds and channels. What the words mean is irrelevant to that. That's also why you want to always speak mantra, not just repeat it to yourself. It's the physical action of the mantra being voiced, being carried on the breath, that give it its power.

    But the words in mantras do have meaning usually. OM MANI PADME HUNG, for instance. OM is the beginning, the source. That's why you see it at the beginning of so many mantras. It doesn't have a meaning per se but is a seed syllable that has power in its own right. MANI means jewel, and PADME means lotus. HUNG (also spelled HUM) is another seed syllable that doesn't have any particular meaning. It's usually found at the end of a mantra.

    OM AH HUNG BENZAR GURU PADMA SIDDHI HUNG is another popular mantra. OM AH HUNG are seed syllables that represent the body, speech and mind. Benzar is the Tibetanization of the Sanskrit vajra (there's no "v" sound in Tibetan, for instance). A vajra is the diamond scepter or thunderbolt that cuts through ignorance. Guru means teacher. Padma means lotus. Siddhis are the powers gained through one's practice. So essentially the mantra is giving one the essence of the path, from the OM AH HUNG that brings all things into existence (In the beginning was the Word...), then the vajra that represents the Dharma cutting through our ignorance, then the Guru who appears in the world to bring us the Holy Dharma and brings our minds to maturation. Padma represents spiritual development, like the petals of the lotus gradually unfolding, and siddhi is the fruition of the practice. So you could say that this mantra is the essence of the entire path in just 12 syllables.

    Mantras originate directly from enlightened mind. They're not the work of some author or anything like that. They are unborn, unceasing and indestructible.

    Hope that helps!

    Palzang
  • edited October 2006
    Thank you for your help and wise words. I have a lot to learn and people like yourself make my journey a pleasant one. OM MANI PADME HUNG is one that I have been known to use. But what I didnt know was the power one holds with breath. This is something that I will work one and hope to learn more about. I was under the impression that the "words" of the mantra was the important part. But I see what you mean without breath and concentration you really dont have much. I guess you can turn your own words into a mantra.

    I thank you again for your help.
  • PalzangPalzang Veteran
    edited October 2006
    jokerz4fun wrote:
    I guess you can turn your own words into a mantra.


    Well, no, not really. The syllables in mantra are there because they set up specific vibrations in the winds and channels. Ordinary words wouldn't do the same thing, but I agree with your point that the breath and concentration are extremely important. But exactly how you deal with the breath and the winds and channels is something on a Dzogchen level of accomplishment and not for us beginners, so I think it's just enough to know that mantra, if done correctly and with proper motivation, is extraordinarily powerful.

    Not long ago someone recorded H.H. Penor Rinpoche and his monks at the New York Retreat Center reciting mantra, the 7-line prayer to Guru Rinpoche, and so forth. He then mixed it with sort of a hip-hop beat. Some people were shocked and said he couldn't do that. Penor Rinpoche just laughed. He said mantra is indestructible, and if mixing it as a hip-hop piece made a connection with those who may have never connected, then that was a good thing! That's the power of mantra.

    Palzang
  • not1not2not1not2 Veteran
    edited October 2006
    Palzang wrote:


    Well, no, not really. The syllables in mantra are there because they set up specific vibrations in the winds and channels. Ordinary words wouldn't do the same thing, but I agree with your point that the breath and concentration are extremely important. But exactly how you deal with the breath and the winds and channels is something on a Dzogchen level of accomplishment and not for us beginners, so I think it's just enough to know that mantra, if done correctly and with proper motivation, is extraordinarily powerful.

    Not long ago someone recorded H.H. Penor Rinpoche and his monks at the New York Retreat Center reciting mantra, the 7-line prayer to Guru Rinpoche, and so forth. He then mixed it with sort of a hip-hop beat. Some people were shocked and said he couldn't do that. Penor Rinpoche just laughed. He said mantra is indestructible, and if mixing it as a hip-hop piece made a connection with those who may have never connected, then that was a good thing! That's the power of mantra.

    Palzang

    That's great. :D I want a copy. I've also heard a techno variation of the prajnaparamita that actually is pretty good. I don't remember the link though.

    _/\_
    metta
  • PalzangPalzang Veteran
    edited October 2006
    I'm not sure. You might check out the www.palyul.org website. I'll check around and see if it's available. I think it would be pretty cool too.

    Palzang
  • edited October 2006
    I'd like to hear both of those. Sounds awesome.
  • PalzangPalzang Veteran
    edited October 2006
    OK, I got the info. Go to palyulproductions.org, click on "Devotional Music", and select "Guru Yoga". There's only a few copies left, but there are lots more on the way.

    Palzang
  • edited November 2007
    I am utterly new at this, but as a first step I have just read 'Buddhism,plain and simple' by Steve Hagen. It has been an excellent way of learning the basics - so easy to follow. I'm also enjoying 'Start where you are' by Pema Chodron. The most interesting thing is trying to apply the ideas to everyday life.
  • edited February 2008
    Hi, All:
    It seems like this thread is a bit threadbare (just one post in the last year), but the book that first got me sitting was Mindfulness in Plain English by Henepola Gunaratana. It's clearly written, no-nonsense, and best of all it's free: http://www.urbandharma.org/udharma4/mpe.html

    In terms of other free web-based resources, Gil Fronsdal is a Vipassana teacher in Redwood City CA who posts all of his talks on a site called audiodharma. http://www.audiodharma.org/talks-gil.html
    He is a very smart guy, and probably my favorite dharma teacher. You can download his talks. Give him a listen, I'd be curious about others' thoughts.

    Anyone else have favorite Buddhist-related materials that are available on the web?

    Gassho,
    Ben
  • JasonJason God Emperor Arrakis Moderator
    edited February 2008
    Ben,

    My favorite Dhamma teacher is Thanissaro Bhikkhu. He is the abbot of Wat Metta, which an international forest monastery in the lineage of Phra Ajaan Mun Bhuridatta Thera. He himself trained under Ajaan Fuang Jotiko and Ajaan Suwat Suvaco. You can find many of his books and essays at Access to Insight here, many of his transcribed Dhamma talks from Wat Metta here, many of his audio Dhamma talks from Wat Metta here, and finally, many of his Dhamma talks from The Insight Meditation Center here.

    Jason
  • edited February 2008
    I liked Steve Hagen's books as well, he has very easy to follow style. He has another out called "buddhism is not what you think" clever hidden meaning title..hee hee.. I just recently finished "Wanting enlightenment is a big mistake, teachings of zen master Seung Sahn" which was pretty good. Like alot of books on buddhism it has parts I can use, and parts I just kind of look at and say "no, I dont like that idea at all". Although if it has one little passage that hits me right, or clears something up, its worth the read. sorry if these titles have already been brought up, I tried to scan the preceding 15 or so pages, theres alot of info in this thread
  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator
    edited February 2008
    Eve...with a signature like that, and an avatar like that - I can forgive you anything!! :D:bigclap:
  • BrigidBrigid Veteran
    edited February 2008
    I agree. Your avatar is hilarious!!
  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator
    edited February 2008
    eve9d9 wrote: »
    Like alot of books on buddhism it has parts I can use, and parts I just kind of look at and say "no, I dont like that idea at all". Although if it has one little passage that hits me right, or clears something up, its worth the read.

    Absolutely 100% on this one with you, Eve... Simply because an Author is expounding views on Buddhism, it doesn't mean I have to either 'agree' with them, or even understand it. Sometimes, in addition to your criteria, I would add .."Hmmmm, have to think about that one...." - !!

    There are a couple of Authors I personally wouldn't dispute, like HH the DL, or the venerable Vietnamese Thich Nhat Hanh. I have to date found their writings supreme. That's not to say I agree 'Mindlessly' with them. I have just found that for me, they rock....!!

    (Statler and Waldorf, playing Golf. Statler is about to putt.
    Says to Waldorf:
    "You're standing on mah hole...!!"
    Waldorf:
    "You must be funny shape!"

    Kids just didn't get it!)
  • edited February 2008
    With you all on that - no one writer has got it ALL spot on, but I'm increasingly finding that spiritual messages come through all sorts of media - when I am pondering a question, I will often find the answer in a snatch of conversation overheard, something on the radio or tv (specifically NOT spiritual discussions) or in some other way.
  • edited February 2008
    glad you guys dug the new avatar, one of my favorite images that I just stumbled across. No one writer has got it all I agree, knitwitch youre right about finding answers, or just interesting thoughts in weird places. Isnt that what its all about though? Being aware of whats going on around you, and using it in your practice? I love it when the most basic ideas turn out to be the most useful ones. Not to get too far off topic, but this is also the reason I dont really subscribe to the idea of different "schools" in buddhism either. I just dont see the advantage in limiting myself, every school like every book, have things I can use, and things I cannot.
  • PalzangPalzang Veteran
    edited February 2008
    Well, it's not at all a question of "limiting" oneself. It's about choosing a path and following it to the end. Not doing so and just picking what you like hither and yon lead to confusion and no progress. That's the sort of spiritual smorgasbord that you see in a place like Sedona where there are lots of (spiritually) hungry people but no coherent means of satisfying that hunger.

    Palzang
  • edited February 2008
    I see your point, but I guess the difference for me is Im not taking what I like, its about taking what is meaningful. I dont have a goal with my practice, I practice as shunryu suzuki says "for the sake of practice". Enlightenment is not a goal to be reached, all of us already have it, therfore no specific path is required to reach it. We just need to foster the ability see it. My practice is to follow the teachings of the buddha at their most basic level, if I subscribe to specific school, and yet there are points of that school that I fundamentally feel are not for me, how can I with clean conscience continue that path? My practice is therefore flawed before I even start. Heres an example. I also study martial arts. My base of study is kickboxing, but in that study I find elements of other styles that are useful to me......the defensive styles, and joint locks of hapkido for instance blend well into kickboxing, and are very useful to know. Would I shun them because Im just a kickboxer? And if I use them can I still call myself simply a kickboxer? Also there are moves in kickboxing that dont fit into my style, even though I recognize them, and dont discount the usefulness of them to others I dont use them often. Does that also mean I cant be a kickboxer, because I dont use all the movements? The answer is: who cares, a name is a name it has no importance, the importance is the action. My opponent might not think of me as a real kickboxer, but if I kick his butt it doesnt really matter does it? Follow your heart, that little voice that tells you what is "right and wrong" is pretty smart, and is there for a reason. I simply follow those hunches, and I rarely go wrong. Of course you will reach a point where you have to align yourself to something. I just keep that allegiance to the most basic level I can, the most basic and fundamental teachings, and that gives me the space I need to build my style, and add the elements I feel will be the best for me...I also reserve myself the right to change that style. Maybe I find something I feel useful, but then under further study it doesnt hold up, or becomes less relevant as time change, or my learning evolves. The dalai lama once said on changing for the modern times "when the teachings of the buddha himself become irrelevant, even those must be discarded". As for satisfying a hunger, I hope I never satisfy it completely, because then I satisfy the desire to learn, and search for truth. And if you think you are 100 percent satified with your life, your level of knowledge, and your understanding of truth, then you are fooling yourself. Let me say Palzang Im not trying to seem like I know more, or have a better way of doing things or anything like that, and I certainly do not mean to convey any disrespect. I have no issue with any school or anyone that studies that school, its all good to me in its way.....just trying to tell you where Im coming from, and being very long winded about it. Maybe we should start a new thread for this topic too, I dont want to steer this one too far off to the side.

    Namaste my homeboy....
    -e-
  • edited March 2008
    The Way Of The Bodhisattva

    Shantideva
    Padmakara Translation Group Edition
  • edited December 2008
    Here are my 3 most recent reads...


    Buddha Is as Buddha Does: The Ten Original Practices for Enlightened Living
    - Lama Surya Das

    Wake Up To Your Life: Discovering the Buddhist Path of Attention - Ken Mcleod

    This Precious Life: Tibetan Buddhist Teachings on the Path to Enlightenment - Khandro Rinpoche

    Anything by Pema Chodron, Thubten Codron, Lama Surya Das, Thich Nhat Hanh, all mentioned before.

    There are a lot of great books out there, and it just depends on if you're looking for introductory reading, maybe some that get deeper into specific traditions, etc. There are some great zen books out there like Opening the Hand of Thought, but I would hardly recommend it to someone who is just wanting to learn about the basics =)
  • edited December 2008
    The Wise Heart by Kornfield - have not finished it, but for seeing the Dharma act in its healing mode, this is the one for you. It appears that no one comes to the Dharma via Kornfield unless they are deeply disturbed & psychological basket-cases. I am exaggerating, but not that much. I guess he chose to highlight the healing properties of attention meditation and such an approach certainly does help & heal.

    Buddhist Meditation by Samdhong Rinpoche - a wonderful text that gives solid and comprehensive guidance & explanations.

    The Buddhist Unconscious by William Waldron - just dipped into it, but looks like a comprehensive study of the history, breadth & depth of the alaya-vijnana.
  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator
    edited December 2008
    Arthur Jeon, "City Dharma"

    How to incorporate the Buddha's teachings in the hectic, hurly-burly, chaotic central part, of 'beautiful downtown' city-living.....

    Very good book.
  • edited December 2008
    Will wrote: »
    The Wise Heart by Kornfield - have not finished it, but for seeing the Dharma act in its healing mode, this is the one for you. It appears that no one comes to the Dharma via Kornfield unless they are deeply disturbed & psychological basket-cases. I am exaggerating, but not that much. I guess he chose to highlight the healing properties of attention meditation and such an approach certainly does help & heal.

    That's one of his books I've been wanting to get. I've got one on the way I got through paperbackswap.com it is called A Path with Heart: A Guide Through the Perils and Promises of Spiritual Life
  • LesCLesC Bermuda Veteran
    edited December 2008
    I've just finished 'Buddhism for Busy People' by David Michie. Very light and easy, but very good. I enjoyed it.
  • BrigidBrigid Veteran
    edited January 2009
    I'm reading "Food for the Heart: The Collected Teachings of Ajahn Chah" right now. I don't think I can ever get enough of Ajahn Chah. And one of the best things about his teachings is that they're good for the beginner and the advanced alike. That man really knew how to teach.
  • SimonthepilgrimSimonthepilgrim Veteran
    edited January 2009
    I have recommended this book elsewhere but am putting it here as well. It is not by a Buddhist nor about Buddhism so why do I recommend it?

    Betraying Spinoza - the renegade Jew who gave us modernity
    by Rebecca Goldstein

    (Nextbook. Schocken. New York. 2006) ISBN 0 8052 4209 0

    Whilst it is a book about an outcast Jewish philosopher of the 17th Century, which may seem irrelevant to the Buddhist experience. I recommend it for the following reasons:
    * It is an easy and enjoyable read about a time and a person of great influence on our modern way of seeing the world;

    * Spinoza was excommunicated from the Sephardic community in Holland and Germany, cast out, if you like, from the bosom of his family and friends because of his beliefs. These were perceived by the said community as being incompatible with the absolute adherence to a written code of laws and practice. Isn't that precisely the experience of many of us here as we found ourselves excluded from comfort and acceptance of framily 'tradition' because we have changed our opinions and practice? Dr Goldstein examines the astonishing philosophy but also shows that it was precisely this reason-based understanding that enabled Spinoza to survive and flourish outside all the available social/faith structures of his time.

    * I'd love you all to discover Spinoza.

    Happy 2009 ff.
  • PalzangPalzang Veteran
    edited January 2009
    Actually we never had a family tradition to follow, so I didn't really exclude myself from anything. As for the church I was brought up in, I never did swallow their brand of whatever it was they were selling.

    As for Spinoza, I am familiar with him, but I have to say I find Kant and Hegel more interesting. But then I do have German blood in me...

    Palzang
  • SimonthepilgrimSimonthepilgrim Veteran
    edited January 2009
    I understand what you are saying, Palzang. I recall, however, that you were 'exiled' because of other prejudice. And is not the 'exile' experience at the root of modern alienation? I find the story of Spinoza, as well as his writings, inspiring in that context.
  • PalzangPalzang Veteran
    edited January 2009
    I guess the truth is I've never really cared that much what other people thought about what I do or say - sometimes to my detriment, unfortunately. I do like Spinoza, just as one of many philosphers.

    Palzang
  • LesCLesC Bermuda Veteran
    edited January 2009
    Alright Simon... you've convinced me... I'll go and read Spinoza!! :)
Sign In or Register to comment.