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How do I know if im doing it right

banned_crabbanned_crab Veteran
edited July 2013 in Meditation
Ive been meditating for about a week and usually it feels pretty alright. I go for 10 min to an hour. I feel somewhat relaxed but also pressured to consistently keep focus on my breath, so im never entirely relaxed. I am obsessed with trying to attain the first jhana, sometimes I think I have reached it but Im not even sure I understand the whole concept of it.

I just dont understand how im supposed to feel during meditation, especially when I am a beginner. I also want to avoid stagnation so I strive to ascend and reach the first jhana. Maybe you can help .

-Ascending to the next level

>So to achieve this jhana I should keep concentration on my breath until my mind goes into that quiet state right?
(I just feel the thinker being very quiet and thoughts disperse than quickly disintegrate .)

> What do I do at this point?
(I also feel like i might be so focused on trying to get to the next step that it hinders me from ascending.)

>When striving to achieve the first jhana (or just improving my basic meditation) which methods are most effective?
>Is it generally better to meditate eyes open or closed?

any extra tips or the sharing of personal meditation experiences are very much appreciated.
dive.jpg 292.3K

Comments

  • riverflowriverflow Veteran
    edited July 2013


    > What do I do at this point?
    (I also feel like i might be so focused on trying to get to the next step that it hinders me from ascending.)

    You've already answered an important question right here. ^^^^^

    From my own experience, I have found it more helpful to not set goals in meditation. Just trust the method, and when the fruit is ripe, it will fall in its own time. Setting goals means having a concern for some anticipated future event, which distracts me from meditating right here and right now.

    I play the shakuhachi, a Japanese flute, sometimes for meditative purposes. When I begin to play, I don't think about getting to the end of a piece or playing the overall piece "just right"-- instead, I focus on THIS note that I play at THIS moment, and then the next note, and so on. I remain focused on just that one note I play right then--nothing else matters.

    By analogy, I would say I have a similar approach to the breath in sitting meditation. Only one breath exists, the one that happens right now.

    At least this seems to work for me. I like Chan/Zen because I like things simple. But others have helpful methods that may work differently from mine.
    banned_crabInvincible_summermaartencvalue
  • karastikarasti Breathing Minnesota Veteran
    I think @fivebells knows quite a bit about the jhanas and has been able to succeed in reaching a couple of them. I think that's the right user...
    Invincible_summer
  • riverflow said:


    > What do I do at this point?
    (I also feel like i might be so focused on trying to get to the next step that it hinders me from ascending.)

    You've already answered an important question right here. ^^^^^

    From my own experience, I have found it more helpful to not set goals in meditation. Just trust the method, and when the fruit is ripe, it will fall in its own time. Setting goals means having a concern for some anticipated future event, which distracts me from meditating right here and right now.

    I play the shakuhachi, a Japanese flute, sometimes for meditative purposes. When I begin to play, I don't think about getting to the end of a piece or playing the overall piece "just right"-- instead, I focus on THIS note that I play at THIS moment, and then the next note, and so on. I remain focused on just that one note I play right then--nothing else matters.

    By analogy, I would say I have a similar approach to the breath in sitting meditation. Only one breath exists, the one that happens right now.

    At least this seems to work for me. I like Chan/Zen because I like things simple. But others have helpful methods that may work differently from mine.
    That is a good point, because I often catch myself being focused on the breath after instead of the current one.
    karasti said:

    If you are striving for a result in meditation, you are only going to meet frustration and defeat. Just my opinion, but being only 1 week into a meditation practice and hoping to attain Jhana seems pretty lofty. Not that it is impossible, by any means. Others with more experience will be able to direct you more fully. But meditation just is, the effects s-l-o-w-l-y start to appear in your everyday life, which for me is where the "magic" of it is. Using it as means to forcefully attain a goal seems to me to go against what meditation is supposed to be about. Goals "happen" more so than they are attained. Expecting something very particular to happen during or after meditation is only going to ensure that you don't properly experience it. Let go of having expectations, and you will probably find your way to your goal much faster.

    Your right, I should only strive to trust in the method. The meditation isnt a means to attain goals, the meditation is the goal.
    genkaku said:

    Dear Friend -- Others will be able to speak more directly to your concerns about attaining one thing or another. I don't know about that route but would offer a couple of suggestions you may want to consider or discard.

    1. The word "Buddha" means "awake." Awake is just awake, regardless of any realm or attainment.
    2. In the beginning, there is often a period of some confusion, so a format is useful. For example, it might be better to pick a specific amount of time for meditation and then sit for that long ... not shorter and not longer. 20-30 minutes might be OK.
    3. Once having determined to sit for a given amount of time at a particular time of day, then do it: Make a promise, keep a promise.
    4. At first, less is probably better than more ... so, maybe once a day or once every other day is enough. At the end of the week, review how things went ... was it too much, was it too little, should you add more sitting or subtract some, etc.? Revise the next week's effort accordingly ... and then review at the end of that week.
    5. Everyone feels like a phony at first. Where big dreams collide with in-your-face facts like sitting ... well, it can be confusing. Addressing that confusion is sometimes helped by learning to count the breath ... count exhalations mentally from one to ten and begin again. If you choose to make this your practice, do not be dissuaded from it no matter how big and wonderful the other ideas you encounter may be. Pick a practice and practice it.
    6. At first, in my opinion, meditation with the eyes open is better. Besides sidestepping the snooze/daydreaming factor, eyes-open will make you strong.
    7. Courage, patience and doubt are yours for the asking ... use these good friends and be determined in your effort.
    8. To the extent you imagine you are going someplace "else," -- to some new and improved realm -- you may know you are off course and it is time to return to practice.
    9. An old Zen saying goes, "Having some attainment is the jackal's yelp. Having no attainment is the lions roar." Here's hoping you are awake and keeping company with the lions.

    :)

    Thanks for the tips, ive been doing all that for the most part so its good to know im doing it correctly, at least in your own idea.

    But are you sure I should go eyes open? when I go eyes open I get distracted by the focus of my vision changing from blurry to more focused(if you know what I mean).

    I just want to use the method that will allow me to experience rapture and other crazy stuff.
  • DakiniDakini Veteran
    edited July 2013

    I im never entirely relaxed. I am obsessed with trying to attain the first jhana, sometimes I think I have reached it but Im not even sure I understand the whole concept of it.

    I just dont understand how im supposed to feel during meditation, especially when I am a beginner. I also want to avoid stagnation so I strive to ascend and reach the first jhana. Maybe you can help .

    Oh good grief! Stop obsessing, and stop striving. Meditation is anti-striving, and anti-obsessing. Just sit and breathe. You're not "supposed to feel" anything. You're just supposed to sit quietly, use the breath to quiet the mind, and see what happens, if anything. It's really pretty anti-climactic. Just stay with it, stay with stilling the mind. That's all. That's usually challenging enough for most beginners. If the mind wanders, bring it back to the breath. That's all. It's kinda like "Seinfeld": a show about nothing. ;)

    If you get tired of focussing on the breath, you can switch (after you've settled down, and you're calm and you've been focussing on the breath a few minutes) to focussing on an image, like the Buddha, the Dalai Lama, a flower, a candleflame. When the mind wanders, bring it back to the object of your focus. Keep it up until you can stay focussed for 20 minutes. Then pick a more complex image, with more detail. Imagine all the detail in your mind. 20-30 minutes, without breaking concentration.

    Just achieving that much should keep you busy for a few months to a year, if you're typical.

    mfranzdorfMaryAnne
  • misecmisc1misecmisc1 I am a Hindu India Veteran
    relax dude. meditation is difficult not because it is complex, rather because it is too simple, and because of it meditation is also not difficult. meditation is done not to achieve anything, rather meditation is done to let go of everything(which we think we have).
    Dakinilobster
  • seeker242seeker242 Zen Florida, USA Veteran
    Good article! Instructions for Entering Jhana ...Leigh Brasington http://www.urbandharma.org/udharma7/enterjhana.html
    personmisecmisc1maarten
  • genkakugenkaku Northampton, Mass. U.S.A. Veteran
    I just want to use the method that will allow me to experience rapture and other crazy stuff.
    @heyimacrab -- If this is an honest statement of intention, then I suggest you find your local, sleazeball drug dealer and stock up.

    While it is true that many use spiritual life as a comic-book escape hatch, that doesn't mean you have to be a jerk as well.

    Pick a practice and practice it.
    lobstercvalue
  • Im not exactly worried about jhana, I just want to avoid being stagnated. I want to make consistent progress
  • As my teacher has said to me all to many a time... "STOP" and just be... This is not a race... there is no goal... only self awareness in this moment of time.
  • Invincible_summerInvincible_summer Heavy Metal Dhamma We(s)t coast, Canada Veteran

    Im not exactly worried about jhana, I just want to avoid being stagnated. I want to make consistent progress

    @heyimacrab - The more you worry about attainment/results/progress, the greater a hindrance it becomes, even if it is with wholesome intention. Even attaining jhana can be risky - once you get a taste of it, you'll start to "look" for clues of it again, and that can also become a hindrance and make your meditation weak and misguided.

    If you've just started to meditate - hell, even if you've meditated for years - I wouldn't worry about stagnation. Just focus on your breath (if that's the type of meditation you're doing, which it sounds like it is) and the associated sensations arising and falling. Progress will come naturally without you needing to force it. Just keep a consistent practice with good effort.
    riverflowkarmabluescvalue
  • JeffreyJeffrey Veteran
    What do you mean by stagnation? Do you mean a feeling or judgement? Do you mean that you want results and don't want to 'fail'?
  • I_AM_THAT said:

    As my teacher has said to me all to many a time... "STOP" and just be... This is not a race... there is no goal... only self awareness in this moment of time.

    Im not exactly worried about jhana, I just want to avoid being stagnated. I want to make consistent progress

    @heyimacrab - The more you worry about attainment/results/progress, the greater a hindrance it becomes, even if it is with wholesome intention. Even attaining jhana can be risky - once you get a taste of it, you'll start to "look" for clues of it again, and that can also become a hindrance and make your meditation weak and misguided.

    If you've just started to meditate - hell, even if you've meditated for years - I wouldn't worry about stagnation. Just focus on your breath (if that's the type of meditation you're doing, which it sounds like it is) and the associated sensations arising and falling. Progress will come naturally without you needing to force it. Just keep a consistent practice with good effort.
    alright guys , i understand. I just have to trust in the method and put good effort.
    Jeffrey said:

    What do you mean by stagnation? Do you mean a feeling or judgement? Do you mean that you want results and don't want to 'fail'?

    I just want to improve myself and stagnation is me not improving.
  • seeker242seeker242 Zen Florida, USA Veteran


    I just want to improve myself and stagnation is me not improving.

    Nothing wrong with that IMO. The Buddha encouraged this type of skillful desire.
    "What is right effort? Herein a monk puts forth will, strives, stirs up energy, strengthens his mind, exerts himself to prevent the arising of evil, of unwholesome thoughts that have not yet arisen; puts forth will... (as before) to banish the evil, unwholesome thoughts that have already arisen; puts forth will... to develop wholesome thoughts that have not yet arisen; and puts forth will, strives, stirs up energy, strengthens his mind, exerts himself to maintain, to preserve, increase, to bring them to maturity, development, and to complete the wholesome thoughts that have arisen. This is called right effort."

    All that is pretty wordy. I think you could paraphrase it by saying "What is right effort? Herein a monk puts forth will, strives, stirs up energy, strengthens his mind, exerts himself to...improve oneself"

    :om:
  • SabreSabre Veteran
    edited July 2013
    And I guess it can't hurt to say that there are different approaches to meditation. I'm saying things from the perspective of the approach I use and I think is most useful. We all do, naturally. But however one sees it, I think no approach teaches that you really have to strive after things or attain things.
    Invincible_summerriverflow
  • JeffreyJeffrey Veteran
    I think you can be inspired without judging the present moment as 'not right meditaton'.

    We wish for good weather each day, but it isn't always good. You can even breath in the stagnation and say "stagnation I see you and I am going to sit with you. You are just impermanent feeling or self-judgement"... I am going to do it no matter how long it takes.
  • lobsterlobster Veteran
    alright guys , i understand. I just have to trust in the method and put good effort.
    start practicing improved behaviour
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Śīla

    keep us posted
    http://aromeditation.org/
    riverflow
  • Sabre said:

    There is nothing essentially wrong with being on the lookout for stagnation, but you first have to understand the process of meditation before knowing what stagnation means, and how to watch for it. You say things like "striving for jhana","pressured" and "obsessed", which indicates you don't yet know. That's ok, it is natural. You only meditate for a week. But you have to know when we talk about progress in meditation it is unlike all other things in life.

    In all other things, you put forth power to progress, and by progressing you accumulate things, you get things. But in meditation you leave things behind. You let things go. So progress is being able to let go more. And stagnation is thus not being able to let go more. What you also need to let go is the wish for progress itself. So that's why worrying about stagnation in itself can be a cause of stagnation. It seems like a contradiction almost, but this is how it goes.

    You can judge if your meditation is going well by what feelings arise during meditation. If feelings of peace and contentment arise, you are going in the right direction. If feelings of pressure or not being steady come up, that's not the right direction.

    Being without thoughts is not necessarily a good indicator for going in the right direction because you can also suppress thoughts by (unknowingly) using force. But that way it will not give rise to the mind going further into peace. You can't do meditation. Many people thus agree the word "concentration" is a very bad translation (it was initially made up by people who didn't meditate). What we do in meditation is not really a concentration training. It is more a training to let go of aversion and craving.

    I hope this helps a bit.

    But I dont understand, you meditation people keep telling me to just let go. But how can I just let go? do I just pretend it doesnt exist? Do I try to have a placebo effect? I cant just let go , because it just feels like im numbing the desires,expectations and disappointments.
  • personperson Where is my mind? 'Merica! Veteran
    Have you ever seen the Karate Kid? Mr. Miagi gave Daniel several chores with specific instructions of how to do it when Daniel went to him to learn karate. They seemed pointless and after a few days Daniel got upset at Mr. Miagi. Then Mr. Miagi asked Daniel to show him how to do the things he had been doing the last several days but just in the air in front of him. They turned out to be the motions for Karate blocks.

    Meditation is the same way. We sit and watch our minds, when we find ourselves getting distracted and carried away in thought we let go and return our focus onto our breath or whatever our object of focus is. Doing this over and over is practice for us to be able to let go in our everyday life.

    It isn't really something you can just do, it takes practice to learn how to do it.

    Patience, grasshopper.
    riverflowkarmablues
  • Invincible_summerInvincible_summer Heavy Metal Dhamma We(s)t coast, Canada Veteran
    edited July 2013

    <
    But I dont understand, you meditation people keep telling me to just let go. But how can I just let go? do I just pretend it doesnt exist? Do I try to have a placebo effect? I cant just let go , because it just feels like im numbing the desires,expectations and disappointments.

    Hey! You're a "meditation people" too! :p

    On a serious note @heyimacrab, the intent to begin a meditation practice is a first step to "letting go." You're letting go of societal expectations to be busy, to be ego-centred, etc. At first, you can feel the letting go of some anxieties and worries that plague you in your day-to-day life. It makes you want to get more serious about meditation.

    What we're telling you is that this desire to do more letting go (i.e. entering jhanas) requires just that very thing - letting go of the expectation to let go.

    It's all easy advice for us to dole out, but ultimately you have to understand through practice & experience what we're talking about when we say "let go."

    Ajahn Brahm (among other teachers) gives a great example about letting go in meditation practice. The more we try and control our practice, the less still and clear our minds/practice become.

    I'm curious what you mean when you say letting go "feels like im numbing the desires, expectations and disappointments." Letting go doesn't mean ignoring/stamping out what feelings/desires arise and pass away. It means that you just leave them be and see them for what they are, without chasing after them or pushing them out.

    riverflowkarmablues
  • You are doing meditation correctly if you can just watch all the activities of the body and mind without judging or expecting anything to happen. Just let things happen by themselves. Don't interfere. Be the bystander.
    Question: I'm trying very hard in my practice but don't seem to be getting anywhere.

    Answer: This is very important. Don't try to get anywhere in the practice. The very desire to be free or to be enlightened will be the desire that prevents your freedom. You can try as hard as you wish, practise ardently night and day, but if it is still with the desire to achieve in mind, you will never find peace. The energy from this desire will be a cause for doubt and restlessness. No matter how long or how hard you practise, wisdom will not arise from desire. So, simply let go. Watch the mind and body mindfully but don't try to achieve anything. Don't cling even to the practice of enlightenment.
    http://www.buddhanet.net/bodhiny2.htm
  • SabreSabre Veteran
    edited July 2013

    Sabre said:

    There is nothing essentially wrong with being on the lookout for stagnation, but you first have to understand the process of meditation before knowing what stagnation means, and how to watch for it. You say things like "striving for jhana","pressured" and "obsessed", which indicates you don't yet know. That's ok, it is natural. You only meditate for a week. But you have to know when we talk about progress in meditation it is unlike all other things in life.

    In all other things, you put forth power to progress, and by progressing you accumulate things, you get things. But in meditation you leave things behind. You let things go. So progress is being able to let go more. And stagnation is thus not being able to let go more. What you also need to let go is the wish for progress itself. So that's why worrying about stagnation in itself can be a cause of stagnation. It seems like a contradiction almost, but this is how it goes.

    You can judge if your meditation is going well by what feelings arise during meditation. If feelings of peace and contentment arise, you are going in the right direction. If feelings of pressure or not being steady come up, that's not the right direction.

    Being without thoughts is not necessarily a good indicator for going in the right direction because you can also suppress thoughts by (unknowingly) using force. But that way it will not give rise to the mind going further into peace. You can't do meditation. Many people thus agree the word "concentration" is a very bad translation (it was initially made up by people who didn't meditate). What we do in meditation is not really a concentration training. It is more a training to let go of aversion and craving.

    I hope this helps a bit.

    But I dont understand, you meditation people keep telling me to just let go. But how can I just let go? do I just pretend it doesnt exist? Do I try to have a placebo effect? I cant just let go , because it just feels like im numbing the desires,expectations and disappointments.
    You ask how can I let go? What do I do? But that comes from a position of wanting to do again. Letting go is not doing. It is not getting involved. And so there is no universal trick for it or a way you can 'do' it. You just have to find the courage to let things settle on their own accord, having the courage to let go of the wheel, not being in control, and also letting go of the desire of being peaceful. Now, you might want to try to not be in control, but that is trying again. You will probably go like this for a while until one moment you begin to understand what I and others are saying.

    Perhaps a more intuitive way to understand letting go is to be contented with whatever arises.

    Having said that, letting go is not the only aspect to meditation, sometimes we need a bit of effort, sometimes a bit of control, but in the end letting go is something we have to learn. Also in the old texts the Buddha said letting go will give rise to the peaceful meditation states.
    karmabluesInvincible_summercvalue
  • genkakugenkaku Northampton, Mass. U.S.A. Veteran
    But I dont understand, you meditation people keep telling me to just let go.
    @heyimacrab -- As I guess what you might describe as one of those "meditation people," I wouldn't advise you to let go, especially if you can't. Instead I suggest you hold on as tight as you can ... don't let go for anything or anyone ... hold on tight-tight-tight.

    Hold on with all your might.
    Practice.
    See what happens.
    banned_crab
  • karastikarasti Breathing Minnesota Veteran
    Sometimes, we need to sit with our feelings and truly go into them and feel them before we can begin to let them go. Most of the time, the strong feelings (fear, disappointment and so on) we are averse to, so we are trying to get rid of them. Sometimes, we need to just sit with them and immerse ourselves in the feelings in order to dig deep enough into why we truly feel them. It's easy to say something like "well, duh, I'm disappointed because I didn't get the job I want/my partner broke up with me" and so on, but the feeling actually goes far, far deeper than that and has next to nothing to do with the situation or other person and everything to do with you. Being willing to take the time to recognize and hold those feelings, and allow yourself to experience them honestly is very difficult, but is often necessary before you can let them go. Until you make the choice to truly feel them on a deeper level they aren't even yours to let go of, until then, they belong to your ego and the last thing your ego wants is to let go of feelings that allow you to feel sorry for yourself. So feel them, sit with them, investigate them. The letting go will happen.
    SabrekarmabluesInvincible_summerbanned_crab
  • If it seems extremely boring and you feel that nothing is happening you are doing it right. Hang in there- it will continue.
    banned_crab
  • JeffreyJeffrey Veteran
    There is a stage called hot boredom when you think of any other things you could be doing and are very restless. That cools to cool boredom where you are like a mountain stream and you just have to be as you are. Nothing to add and nothing to take away.
    riverflowlobsterbanned_crabmisecmisc1
  • lobsterlobster Veteran
    I think you have been given outstanding advice at a number of levels.
    My teacher never meditated but I was never with him when he was not meditative or mindful.

    Personally I only meditate to appear cool and chill.

    Yesterday I used some noisy 'Zen' breath counting app, today I will just quietly for a while, so no one will notice . . . especially 'me'.

    :clap:
    banned_crab
  • footiamfootiam Veteran
    Meditation should not be about feeling. It is about being aware.
  • seeker242seeker242 Zen Florida, USA Veteran
    edited July 2013



    But I dont understand, you meditation people keep telling me to just let go. But how can I just let go?

    Just by returning to the breathing. Just "returning to the breathing" and "letting go" are the same thing. So you are sitting there breathing. Something appears and takes you off the breathing. Now, all this other stuff starts to happen. All these thoughts appear. All these feeling appear and they do all kinds of stuff. Once you notice that you are now off the breathing, you return yourself to the breathing. That's all you really have to do. Once you are fully back on the breathing, you have now "let go" of all that other stuff.

    Once this happens, all that other stuff, that seemed so significant a moment ago, disappears in the blink of an eye. Completely gone, just like that. Just by returning to the breathing.

    You really don't even have to worry about letting go. Letting go happens automatically, all by itself, just by returning to the breathing. Just by returning to the breathing alone, the letting go is inevitable. This is how I do it anyway. Just return to the breathing and that's it. Nothing more, nothing less. Very simple. :)

    Jeffreycvalue
  • yes keep it simple .....simply staying gently but determinedly, lovingly but focused on the object of your meditation the less the thoughts (our questions included) swallow us up . I love this guided meditation and there are several on you tube- going to a meditation group, and if at all possible an experienced meditation teacher for a weekend retreat also helps tremendously .......I was lucky to find one myself...be kind to yourself. thanks for your question because it reminded me to do the same for myself. I also get frustrated with aspects of my thoughts :)

    CLICK TO youtube.com/joseph goldstein guided meditation
  • jlljll Veteran
    Take it easy, be patient.
    My prediction is you wont get jhanas
    until at least 6 mths later.

    the thing is to observe your own mind.
    get to know this stranger who lives inside your head.

    what is he up to now?

    meditation feels like nothing to a beginner.
    it feels like a waste of time.
    so, be patient and persevere.

    find a teacher, i recommend Thanissaro bikkhu of accesstoinsight.com

    Ive been meditating for about a week and usually it feels pretty alright. I go for 10 min to an hour. I feel somewhat relaxed but also pressured to consistently keep focus on my breath, so im never entirely relaxed. I am obsessed with trying to attain the first jhana, sometimes I think I have reached it but Im not even sure I understand the whole concept of it.

    I just dont understand how im supposed to feel during meditation, especially when I am a beginner. I also want to avoid stagnation so I strive to ascend and reach the first jhana. Maybe you can help .

    -Ascending to the next level

    >So to achieve this jhana I should keep concentration on my breath until my mind goes into that quiet state right?
    (I just feel the thinker being very quiet and thoughts disperse than quickly disintegrate .)

    > What do I do at this point?
    (I also feel like i might be so focused on trying to get to the next step that it hinders me from ascending.)

    >When striving to achieve the first jhana (or just improving my basic meditation) which methods are most effective?
    >Is it generally better to meditate eyes open or closed?

    any extra tips or the sharing of personal meditation experiences are very much appreciated.

    cvalue
  • i have read a lot good advice here i know i didnt start this tread but ty all for your input i to had been kind of at a lost for what i should be doing i just had been doing want ever felt right and there as been some time since i had been able to mediate but because of this i was able to do it today and it felt very good make me very relaxed and i feel like have grew because of it again ty
  • I'd like to add, and it seems important, that the earlier comment that many years of work would be required before noticeable results can be achieved is overstating the case. It may often be true, or even usually be true, but my very first fifteen minute meditation session was a real eye-opener and quite exciting. (Which is not to say that this turned into continued progress, or that anything particularly profound occured). The Buddha speaks of making significant progress in a month given the right motivation and approach..

    When I took up the clarinet as an adult I couldn't get a note out of the damn thing for a week. Then I had a lesson. My teachers advice, after some words about embouchure etc, was to keep going until I made a decent note and then remember what I did. Perhaps this would be reasonable advice for meditation in some situations.

    I suspect that beginner's mind is the crucial thing. Without that we are likely to meet imaginary obstacles of our own making. Like worrying about achieving jhanas before we even have a clue what we're worrying about. .




    misterCope
  • CoryCory Tennessee Veteran
    Short answer. You will feel it.
    misterCope
  • Sorry. That last remark of mine might have sounded a bit rude. Perhaps I should have added that I have no idea whether I've achieved a jhana or not, and do not even know the definition.
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