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Forgotten victims of the War on Drugs

You know, I keep seeing things like this happen more often. Who are we to sit idly by while the innocent lives of our youth are destroyed? in some cases, quite literally? Does that not make as just as guilty as those who stole that child from her home? does that not make us just as guilty as the ones who killed her? The Government does *not* listen to peaceful protests. If they did, our nation would have changed drastically by now. No, now protests and the like are cordoned off in fenced-out "free speech areas" (I though our entire nation was a free speech area) where they can be ignored.

I can only wonder how long it will be when these armed agents of the state show up, and the populace at large utterly ignores their claim to authority. And, possibly, begins to shoot back.

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ROUND ROCK, TX -- A little girl was confiscated from her loving parents because they smoked marijuana, and given away to a foster mother who put her into a coma and killed her. Alexandria Hill, age 2, succumbed to her injuries after being "thrown to the ground."

"We never hurt our daughter. She was never sick, she was never in the hospital, and she never had any issues until she went into state care," said Joshua Hill, the girl's natural father.

Hill says that his daughter was put in to more than one dangerous foster home.

"She would come to visitation with bruises on her, and mold and mildew in her bag. It got to a point where I actually told CPS that they would have to have me arrested because I wouldn't let her go back," said Hill.

The girl was then moved to a different foster home, under the care of Sherill Small in Rockdale, and Hill says things seemed safe there. However, appearances were deceiving.

On Monday night, Hill got an urgent call to come to the hospital. When he got there , he found his daughter in a coma. She died 2 days later.

This illustrates a widespread injustice perpetrated regularly across the country. Healthy, happy children are stolen from loving families who have never once caused them harm, and put into the care of the state, where they can be forcibly drugged and put into all kinds of questionable situations with strangers. And this is done without a trial, without a conviction, without due process. A simple accusation of "neglect" (a loosely defined term these days) can result in armed agents of the state entering your home to kidnap your child.

Hill was 4 months away from getting his daughter returned to him.

SOURCE:
www.youtube.com/watch?v=Etw_QSvC2ag

Comments

  • That's terrible. Some things need to be regulated, but pragmatism rather than idealism is necessary to investigate what does harm and what does good. In this case I see that marijuana using parents seemed via bias that they were unsound relative to foster care. And unfortunately the foster care is terrible in this case. I see this as not just 'war on drugs' as the bigger issue is flaws in the foster care.
    Dandelionericcris10senriverflow
  • ZaylZayl Veteran
    @Jeffry indeed, I agree. And apparently it has come to light that the father had also almost dropped his daughter down the stairs, when he was high. As reported by his Aunt. I don't know why his Aunt didn't take his kids in, though. At least it's family.
  • Well when a loaded gun is left in a child's reach and that gun accidentally kills that child (or another one) no one rushes in to take those children out of those neglectful parents' home, do they? Oh no.... it's all sympathy and prayers for the poor parents who lost a child in such a tragedy.....

    But find out otherwise perfectly loving, hardworking, responsible parents smoke a little weed now and then after the kids go to bed on a Saturday night, and it's a swat team intervention and foster care for those kids!

    Yes, @Zayl, it really makes very little sense this 'war on drugs'. However, I am hopeful lately.... one by one more and more states are relaxing penalties and /or allowing medical cannabis (which is a start, but sshhhh don't tell anyone...) and I really believe-- for the first time in about 35 yrs -- that we just might see cannabis decriminalized and regulated in my lifetime. Take Heart.
    riverflow
  • karastikarasti Breathing Minnesota Veteran
    The kid who killed his little sister with his preschool child sized rifle was just astonishing to me. That a loaded gun was sitting in the corner of a family room, and STILL the parents were not charged with anything. I just don't get it.
    I find it odd, too, that the kid in the story above was put in stranger foster care instead of with family while the parents worked to get custody back.
    We demonize certain things and celebrate others, and we just have it so, so backwards much of the time.
    riverflow
  • vinlynvinlyn Colorado...for now Veteran
    To some extent, laws on based on averages. On average it's safer to wear a seat belt, but there are times when having a seat belt on resulted in a death. So I can see where the state came from in taking the child away in the first place.
  • I wonder what happened that got the state involved in the first place. I just searched around a bit and couldn't find that detail.
  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator
    The thread title is entirely misleading, BtW....
  • What's most surprising to me is that this apparently can be done "without a trial, without a conviction, without due process." There was no judge involved?
  • ChazChaz The Remarkable Chaz Anywhere, Everywhere & Nowhere Veteran
    maarten said:

    What's most surprising to me is that this apparently can be done "without a trial, without a conviction, without due process." There was no judge involved?

    They can do that and more.

    Sadly, this has little to do with justice or public good/safety.

  • JohnGJohnG Veteran
    The war on drugs is only going to be getting uglier if those who can make a difference do not run for office. We can only make change when the numbers in congress (both state and federal) are on one side.

    The second issue is that there's a lot of money in both sides of the war; organized crime will not allow any removal of drug laws; they will not go the way of the MAFIA, which lost billions when prohibition was lifted. It's all in the money, and in war there will always be war profiteers, and a legitimate war makes money on both sides of the war.
  • TheswingisyellowTheswingisyellow Trying to be open to existence Samsara Veteran
    It's makes a lot of money and power for a lot of people, drug cartels, police agencies and the prison industrial complex. It's sort of like our perpetual war on terror somebody's getting paid. When one has a war on a vice or a tactic one's war will never end.
  • vinlynvinlyn Colorado...for now Veteran

    It's makes a lot of money and power for a lot of people, drug cartels, police agencies and the prison industrial complex. It's sort of like our perpetual war on terror somebody's getting paid. When one has a war on a vice or a tactic one's war will never end.

    So you just surrender?

  • TheswingisyellowTheswingisyellow Trying to be open to existence Samsara Veteran
    Surrender what?
    Incarcerating people for non-violent offences?
    Drone striking children?
    Sure why not! Our war on tactics and vice hasn't been very successful has it? Maybe we should rethink what we are doing and what we are reaping for our actions.
    Our indiscriminate killing overseas has only served those who would harm us with fresh recruits. Our drug war has 60% of our jails filled with people who are there for non-violent reasons, keeping them there at great expense while diverting money that could be used to deter and investigate violent crime. We have the highest, percentage wise, of a jailed populace than any other country in the world and continue to have one of the worst drug problems of any country. Let's criminalize tobacco and alcohol while we are it, after all both are responsible hundreds of thousands of deaths every year and alcohol is a factor in much violent crime.
    Maybe its not working.
    robot
  • vinlynvinlyn Colorado...for now Veteran

    Surrender what?
    Incarcerating people for non-violent offences?
    Drone striking children?
    Sure why not! Our war on tactics and vice hasn't been very successful has it? Maybe we should rethink what we are doing and what we are reaping for our actions.
    Our indiscriminate killing overseas has only served those who would harm us with fresh recruits. Our drug war has 60% of our jails filled with people who are there for non-violent reasons, keeping them there at great expense while diverting money that could be used to deter and investigate violent crime. We have the highest, percentage wise, of a jailed populace than any other country in the world and continue to have one of the worst drug problems of any country. Let's criminalize tobacco and alcohol while we are it, after all both are responsible hundreds of thousands of deaths every year and alcohol is a factor in much violent crime.
    Maybe its not working.

    Well, first of all you didn't differentiate between levels of drug offenses. And you've lumped the poor pot smoker and the drug cartel kingpin in the same group. So when it comes to non-violent offenses, while some are, others are not. And I'm sorry, but I don't condone -- and don't want our country to condone -- the use of major drugs such as heroin and cocaine.

    And while our war on terror is far from perfect, it's also far from unneeded. And I tire of people like you taking a short cut to the big picture by saying things like, "Drone striking children". No one can argue that drone striking children is wrong, but in a discussion the inflammatory nature of such comments is a short cut to a well thought out discussion of the terror issue.

    The problem is that your observations also don't solve the problems.

  • LincLinc Community Instigator Detroit Moderator
    Zayl said:

    And apparently it has come to light that the father had also almost dropped his daughter down the stairs, when he was high.

    I don't understand getting judgmental about an "almost" accident that could've just as easily happened stone sober.
    MaryAnne
  • karastikarasti Breathing Minnesota Veteran
    I tripped over a cement parking marker in the winter, carrying my son and a bag of Burger King. We both fell and I landed on him. Thankfully he did not get any serious injuries. Accidents just happen, I agree, it probably didn't even have anything to do with him being high. How many parents sit at home and drink beer on football Sunday with their kids in the house? Another part of a broken system that feels the need to punish someone yet often gets it so wrong.
    Vastmind
  • vinlynvinlyn Colorado...for now Veteran
    Buts let's admit, we know almost nothing about the specifics of the case.

    Every state is different, and I certainly don't know what that's state DHS is like, but as principal 2-3 times a year I would have to call Child Protective Services in my county when we would find out about abuse. Sometimes they wouldn't even touch a case than I (and we) felt was significant abuse. Other times they tread very, very carefully. Never did they take a child away from the parents. So, I wonder what we might think if we had the whole story.
  • TheswingisyellowTheswingisyellow Trying to be open to existence Samsara Veteran
    edited August 2013
    "people like you"-??????
    What the hell does that mean?
    I have given a lot of thought to both of these issue, they are not just knee jerk responses.
    Vinlyn you often don't seem to like what I post, if that is the case then simply don't respond to what I write. I am not here to argue with you.
  • vinlynvinlyn Colorado...for now Veteran

    "people like you"-??????
    What the hell does that mean?
    Vinlyn you often don't seem to like what I post, if that is the case then simply don't respond to what I write. I am not here to argue with you.

    And, of course, the same approach is open to you when I post.

  • TheswingisyellowTheswingisyellow Trying to be open to existence Samsara Veteran
    Have a good day sir :)
  • BeejBeej Human Being Veteran
    The war on drugs has never been a war on drugs. Its only ever been a war on people. Many of these people have problems and cant get the help they need via the state or with their own means, so they turn to drugs. Because everybody, everywhere, wants relief from suffering. What should we say to these people? Should we say "Shame on you for not suffering our way!". Pffft. Nonsense.

    MaryAnneTheswingisyellow
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