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Japanese, Chinese and Vedic/Hindu deities in Mahayana?

DaftChrisDaftChris Spiritually conflicted. Not of this world. Veteran
edited August 2013 in Faith & Religion
I know it's more prevalent in Vajrayana, but which of the aforementioned gods, if any, appear in the various Mahayana schools? Specifically the Japanese and Chinese schools?

Comments

  • DaftChrisDaftChris Spiritually conflicted. Not of this world. Veteran
    No answers, anyone?
  • Isn't Kuan Yin from Chinese Buddhism? A name for Avalokiteshevra? Sorry that's all I got.
  • DaftChris said:

    No answers, anyone?

    Interested in avoiding dukkha yet?

    The right answer to wrong questions is Noble Silence.
    Thus have I not heard. :orange:

    Normal static is now resumed . . .
  • DaftChrisDaftChris Spiritually conflicted. Not of this world. Veteran
    lobster said:

    DaftChris said:

    No answers, anyone?

    Interested in avoiding dukkha yet?

    The right answer to wrong questions is Noble Silence.
    Thus have I not heard. :orange:

    Normal static is now resumed . . .
    It was just a question. Nothing more; Nothing less.
  • DaftChris said:

    I know it's more prevalent in Vajrayana, but which of the aforementioned gods, if any, appear in the various Mahayana schools? Specifically the Japanese and Chinese schools?

    Saraswati and Ganesha are well-known in Japanese Buddhist schools, under different names but they are the same deities. The Jade Emperor (King of Heaven) of Taiosm, aka Shakra is virtually the same as Indra aka Shakra. Tara is Durga. Cundi is mot likely Chandika, a fierce form of Durga. The Jade Emperor is the protector of Buddhist Dharma. Shiva and Vishnu are praised in the Nilakantha aka Mahakaruna Dharani of Avalokiteshvara. Lots of cross-pollination; same deities, different names.

  • According to master Chin Kung. Today, there are four types of Mahayana Buddhism being practiced in China, Taiwan...

    First, there is the religious Buddhism, which can be witnessed in temples throughout Taiwan. However, this does not represent the real Buddhism.

    Second, there is the academic Buddhism being taught in many universities today, where we see Buddhism being treated purely as philosophy, an academic pursuit, especially in Japan. This is not exactly Buddha's education either.

    Third, and the most unfortunate of all, is the total degeneration of Buddhism into a cult. This third type of Buddhism is much more damaging to the public than the first two types.

    Finally, there is the traditional Buddhism, the teachings of Buddha Shakyamuni in its true essence, which is very rare in our day and age.
    The type of Buddhists who believes in Gods, according to master Chin Kung, does not represent the real Buddhism.
  • DaftChris said:

    I know it's more prevalent in Vajrayana, but which of the aforementioned gods, if any, appear in the various Mahayana schools? Specifically the Japanese and Chinese schools?

    Besides paying homage to the Buddha, many Chinese who profess to be Buddhist pray to Chinese deities too. I suppose such Chinese are not Buddhists in the real sense but then, what's wrong with paying homage to deities like one pay homage to other fellow humans? That's a good trait, isn't it -respecting others, whether they are real or not.
    Kundo
  • If someone prays to a deity, does it not depend on how they interpret what that deity is? Is it in fact a 'god' as in an almighty type if being or is it an aspect of mind that has to be cultivated a a tool on the path to enlightenment? If the deity is a tool, a helping hand, then surly that praying person is a Buddhist.
    Jainarayan
  • I am interested not in converting other people to Buddhism but in how we Buddhists can contribute to human society, according to our own ideas. I believe that other religious faiths also think in a similar way, seeking to contribute to the common aim...
    --- His Holiness the Dalai Lama
    Jainarayan
  • If someone prays to a deity, does it not depend on how they interpret what that deity is? Is it in fact a 'god' as in an almighty type if being or is it an aspect of mind that has to be cultivated a a tool on the path to enlightenment? If the deity is a tool, a helping hand, then surly that praying person is a Buddhist.

    I agree with you that it depends entirely on how one sees a deity or the deities. Are they aspects of ourselves we call upon? Are they otherworldly, enlightened and/or advanced beings who can help? I think they are both.

    I've recently begun the process of abandoning the practice of Hinduism. That is to say, the rituals, superstitions, must-do-must-not-do, which god is superior, which god is supreme, and so on. I'm returning to my panendeist inclinations, with the belief in deities I described.

    At the risk of making a broad, sweeping and generalizing comment, I think most Buddhists who pray to deities or believe in them believe in them that way. Much as Catholics pray to saints for help, using their semi-divine powers.

    OK, just a brainfart. :crazy:
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