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Humiliy, Self Esteem, Hauteur

Rabbi Simcha Bunim of Peshicha (1765-1827) used to say that everyone should keep a piece of paper with “for my sake the world was created” in one pocket, and a piece of paper with “I am but dust and ashes” in another. The Rabbi was expressing an existential truth: each individual being is important, but not self-important.
http://www.existentialbuddhist.com/tag/humility/

Do you have low self esteem? Is this a psychological problem? Personally I think low self esteem is a subtle form of arrogance. In effect belittling an important person.

Outwardly, humility is often not big in Buddhism. In other paths it is important. What is it? How and why does it arise?
Are you as humble as me? (Whadya mean, 'trick question'?) :rolleyes:

Here is part of a training methodology:
http://www.dalailama.com/teachings/training-the-mind/verse-2
oceancaldera207VastmindThePensum

Comments

  • Lobster, you're getting aweful close to making sense. Have you stopped your practice? :)

    I see pride and shame as two faces of the same coin... using our actions to invigorate self grasping. With pleasant results, pride compares action to self "more than others". With unpleasant results, shame compares action to self "less than others". As we honor the lineage of teachers (who taught us liberation and delusion) a natural humility arises that we are part of an evolution of beings from ignorance to wisdom.

    It reminds me of a game of cosmic hot potato, where teachings have been passed along through time, and the karma that results from the mix between binding and unbinding ethos, and we in the present are simply the vessels. How could pride or shame make any sense?

    Namaste
    Jeffrey
  • Personally I think low self esteem is a subtle form of arrogance. In effect belittling an important person.
    I thought this was a nice thing to say. Reminds me of a cosmic crustacean hug . None of us want to be arrogant, so lets not think so little of ourselves.. I like it!
  • VastmindVastmind Memphis, TN Veteran
    As usual...your commentary on the subject of choice is thought provoking
    with a chuckle thrown in.
    As usual...your links tie it all up and give me something to
    take away.

    Am I as humble as you? You tell me.

    :bowdown:
  • lobsterlobster Veteran
    edited September 2013
    Am I as humble as you? You tell me.
    No.
    I am far more humble. :wave:
    http://www.hermes-press.com/haughty_generous.htm
    sova
  • we make the mistake of comparing
    ourself with others.

    you are NOT better than others, lobster.

    lobster said:

    Rabbi Simcha Bunim of Peshicha (1765-1827) used to say that everyone should keep a piece of paper with “for my sake the world was created” in one pocket, and a piece of paper with “I am but dust and ashes” in another. The Rabbi was expressing an existential truth: each individual being is important, but not self-important.
    http://www.existentialbuddhist.com/tag/humility/

    Do you have low self esteem? Is this a psychological problem? Personally I think low self esteem is a subtle form of arrogance. In effect belittling an important person.

    Outwardly, humility is often not big in Buddhism. In other paths it is important. What is it? How and why does it arise?
    Are you as humble as me? (Whadya mean, 'trick question'?) :rolleyes:

    Here is part of a training methodology:
    http://www.dalailama.com/teachings/training-the-mind/verse-2

  • lobster, you are NOT worse than others, either.

    you are just different from others.

    i was paraphrasing Buddha's words.
  • you are just different from others
    My humility for better or worse, is different. Just so. :thumbup:
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