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The man and three mules

NMADDPNMADDP SUN Diego, California Explorer
edited September 2013 in Buddhism Today
The man and his mules, they could be Bodhisattva showing us the way.

Man wandering around California with three mules

enjoy...
LincMaryAnne

Comments

  • NirvanaNirvana aka BUBBA   `     `     ` `     ` Outa Range Fridays thru Sundays South Carolina, USA Veteran
    I've mulled over this just a wee bit since I read the rather long article yesterday and I think that in real life I'd side with the residents who complain. The guys got too much baggage and has connotations of mange.

    Reminds me of the "You might be a redneck if...

    Your car is on blocks and your house is on wheels."

    Sharing the road also entails going with the flow when you're on it. It's too bad when all the old, less busy roads get turned into the fast lane, but that impoverishes us all, not just one man. Sorry, I just didn't get the point, unless if it was just nonconformity.

    Well, none of us should conform to the ways of this world, but should strike out on our own doing unconventional, loving things. Let two of the mules go, by golly, old guy!
    42bodhi
  • LincLinc Community Instigator Detroit Moderator
    edited September 2013
    This article was deeply interesting to me. Suburban sprawl, over-development, and loss of public spaces are issues I am greatly concerned about. Overzealous & misinformed police officers added some righteous indignation to the mix.
    Nirvana said:

    I'd side with the residents who complain. The guys got too much baggage and has connotations of mange.

    I do not understand getting hung up on how your neighbors live to the point that you can't help but tell them about it. It's the ultimate attachment to some non-existent community ideal.
    Nirvana said:

    Sharing the road also entails going with the flow when you're on it. ... Sorry, I just didn't get the point, unless if it was just nonconformity.

    I couldn't disagree more. Streets are public spaces, and this cars-first idea is a recent and terrible innovation.
    Nirvana said:

    Reminds me of the "You might be a redneck if...

    Redneck jokes make fun of people and how they live.
    42bodhiI_AM_THAT
  • oceancaldera207oceancaldera207 Veteran
    edited September 2013
    When I hitchhiked/walked between cities as a youth, I was constantly stopped by police along highways.. the impression that one gets is that it is very frowned upon for a person to travel this way...which was very disheartening to me... If you can't even walk to travel, what does that say about our society. It was like I was a constant nusiance to people for no reason at all. I never begged or impeded traffic, nor was I ever intoxicated, but somehow I was still 'in the way'.
    I should note though that I never got any tickets on my travels..so it could be said that some of the police contact was concern for well being.
  • LincLinc Community Instigator Detroit Moderator
    edited September 2013
    One thing I love about my neighborhood is how all kinds of folks live here. There is both race and class diversity, and all manner of dwellings - from tiny apartments to giant Victorian houses - all bunched & mixed together in the same few blocks. We have a group home across the street, and our nextdoor neighbor owns a large downtown business. Some houses look great, and a few look like they're ready for the wrecking ball (literally). The police here are well-educated and patient folks who get out of their cars ready to use their notebooks not their alpha-male voices. Overall, this neighborhood is super friendly and has a live-and-let-live demeanor.

    But, there are a few neighbors who ceaselessly harp on their pet issue. Maybe it's the historical accuracy of the work you're doing on your house. Maybe it's leashing your dog. Maybe it's the social injustice they see in the elitism of your assumptions (a large university borders the neighborhood so we get the whole range of philosophical differences).

    My biggest gripe is people who find an axe to grind with you before they've talked to you five minutes. I feel like the suburban mentality of "assimilate or get the fuck out" is a terrible disease, and the first symptoms are "well I don't like how you're doing that so I'm calling the police/association or posting about it on Facebook. Oh, it's not illegal? Well maybe it should be!"

    Maybe it should be illegal to harass people minding their own business and living a simple life.
    VastmindMaryAnne
  • oceancaldera207oceancaldera207 Veteran
    edited September 2013
    @Lincoln in the neighborhood case it is probably just that in any group of people you're going to find one or two of that agressive, intrusive, constantly bothered and angry personality type. It seems that any job I've ever had, there's been at least one... And if they're in a position of authority it can make it seem that the prevailing attitude is more oppressive than it actually is. Its taken me many years to come to this conclusion..it wasn't an easy one to make though, as I am generally very respectful of people's space and privacy and uniqueness..so imposing, assumptive and belittling attitudes really really bother me.
    MaryAnne

  • I think this man (and his mules) have a beautiful life. He's living his life exactly as he wants to, what can make one's life more "beautiful" than that?

    He's harming no one, damaging nothing, upsetting nothing - except the illusion (some people have) that we should all be living according to some strict, unbending facade of "civilization and acceptability".
    I say "F that". You go, Mule!

    I hope he lives how ever many more years he has left doing exactly what he wants to do; and if that means to continue walking with the sun and seasons, down the streets and along busy highways with his mules and sleeping in "public" parks and on "public lands"... then so be it.
    May he stay healthy and stay safe for many years to come!

  • sndymornsndymorn Veteran
    edited September 2013
    I couldn't disagree more. Streets are public spaces, and this cars-first idea is a recent and terrible innovation. Said Lincoln.


    Streets are to move people and goods. When Mule is more the norm, laws will change to suite this tempo. Until them , perhaps he should wander in Amish country.

    But California , his latest choice for his nomadic cycle, is a very good choice . If I were him I might pick the same. We have lots of greenery here ..... I am sure he'd do no harm as he moseyed.
  • LincLinc Community Instigator Detroit Moderator
    sndymorn said:

    Streets are to move people and goods. When Mule is more the norm, laws will change to suite this tempo. Until them , perhaps he should wander in Amish country.

    Funny you should mention that to a Lancaster County, Pennsylvania native. :) The difference in "Amish country" is simply that the Amish have the political power and numbers that any driver who does not respect their right-of-way will be in deep shit (excuse the pun) and the police are well trained in the matter. I don't know of any special laws regarding it nor do I see any reason it should be different elsewhere other than a lack of awareness.
  • i loved this article. i feel for the guy he works enough to get by then goes where he wants he doesnt bother anyone. people seem to just get easily flustered around having to wait a little bit longer in their car because the guy doesnt have an alternative route to travel on seems like a failure in peoples patience and in the road system.
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