Examples: Monday, today, last week, Mar 26, 3/26/04
Welcome home! Please contact lincoln@newbuddhist.com if you have any difficulty logging in or using the site. New registrations must be manually approved which may take up to 48 hours. Can't log in? Try clearing your browser's cookies.

The Beauty of Buddhism (is it a state of mind or just the way things are)

Practicing just last year gave rise to some questions. Why when we started to meditate, we begin just being "the observer", that judgement become less and less. And sometimes, I felt that my mind no longer thinks. It just sits there.

Another observation is that by practicing meditation, we begin to appreciate "silence" - I no longer enjoy in going to the mall and found parks are more attractive to me. Any place where I my mind find tranquility.

Lastly, I realized that my view of death is far different when I was a christian. The fear is gone, fear of a higher "Supreme Powerful God" will punish me for what I've done wrong, and send me to "eternal hell" My wife was a little "shocked" when I said - I no longer believe in a creator God, and that it is "we" that can determine our future existences. I am just being honest. I can no longer process that there is God capable of sending His own children to eternal damnation. If there is God who is compassion and merciful- I don't see any reason of condemnation just because we didn't just make it right this time.
Anybody who had the same experience?

lobstersovarohittibellus

Comments

  • DavidDavid some guy The Hammer in Ontario, Canada, eh Veteran
    edited March 2015

    @mockeymind said:
    Practicing just last year gave rise to some questions. Why when we started to meditate, we begin just being "the observer", that judgement become less and less. And sometimes, I felt that my mind no longer thinks. It just sits there.

    That's good I think. As long as when it just sits there, there is still awareness and not a "zoning out". When I feel myself zoning out I still try to come back to whatever practice I'm doing.

    Another observation is that by practicing meditation, we begin to appreciate "silence" - I no longer enjoy in going to the mall and found parks are more attractive to me. Any place where I my mind find tranquility.

    I find that too.

    Lastly, I realized that my view of death is far different when I was a christian. The fear is gone, fear of a higher "Supreme Powerful God" will punish me for what I've done wrong, and send me to "eternal hell" My wife was a little "shocked" when I said - I no longer believe in a creator God, and that it is "we" that can determine our future existences. I am just being honest. I can no longer process that there is God capable of sending His own children to eternal damnation. If there is God who is compassion and merciful- I don't see any reason of condemnation just because we didn't just make it right this time.
    Anybody who had the same experience?

    There were a few reasons why none of that made any sense to me but it never did in the first place.

    I'm not sure I want to go into that though.

    Let's just say I don't see how a jealous and emotional deity could be considered enlightened, awakened or in any way supreme.

    They lost me as soon as they let me feel compassion for the snake.

    Earthninja
  • silversilver In the beginning there was nothing, and then it exploded. USA, Left coast. Veteran

    Hi @mockeymind. I think the beauty of Buddhism is the way we look at things while we're incarnated on this planet...it's impossible to see such beauty without looking at stuff from the 'right' angle and with proper perspective and attitude. Incidentally, did you really have to tell her you no longer 'believe' in the Christian God? I think the Buddha would've said or thought or quipped that it's not a contest and that the Christian 'God' was perhaps a man just like the Buddha with the same 'take' on things as the Buddha's but was misunderstood and had his words twisted. In the end, he wound up being considered 'a god' because people felt so strongly about what Christ did teach even without fully comprehending what he taught or was trying to teach the masses.

    In essence, the Buddha once said it's no good to debate the theories and philosophies because there are many, each with their own faults.

  • @ourself @federica - my friend buddhist is a co-worker and he said the even those blissful experience should "go", not to be retained. I mean no need for a scoreboard tally. What happened now? I only know breathing and loving kindness meditation so far, how many meditation are there in buddhism? Is it recommend to find a teacher?

    I have no Sangha and I found buddhism by just accident.

  • Ajahn Bram mentioned on one of his talks that believing or not (in God) is not that important. It is ones mind should be watched. It should be freed and should able to do investigation without fear.

    silverEarthninja
  • Buddhism doesn't speak out is there any God or not. It's not that important. But Buddhists have those devas. I personally believe in God which is not combined to any religion. If someone gets a serious allergenic reaction of that God-word, it's not my problem.

    silvermockeymindsndymornEarthninja
  • I think some of the Bodhisattva or is it tantric vows say to not take refuge in a God.

  • Don't take a refuge in a God, nor in any religion! Follow your heart, which is the best and most honest way to live in this world. My worldview is based mostly in Buddhism, although that expression may sound wrong or weird.

  • Will_BakerWill_Baker Vermont Veteran

    (is it a state of mind or just the way things are)
    -It seems to me when we practice we become aware of the way things "really are." It's as if a light (truth) is perpetually shining but we can only discern the truth if we choose/work/remember to open our eyes to it...

    Earthninja
  • sovasova delocalized fractyllic harmonizing great lakes Veteran

    @mockeymind said:
    Practicing just last year gave rise to some questions. Why when we started to meditate, we begin just being "the observer", that judgement become less and less. And sometimes, I felt that my mind no longer thinks. It just sits there.

    Another observation is that by practicing meditation, we begin to appreciate "silence" - I no longer enjoy in going to the mall and found parks are more attractive to me. Any place where I my mind find tranquility.

    Lastly, I realized that my view of death is far different when I was a christian. The fear is gone, fear of a higher "Supreme Powerful God" will punish me for what I've done wrong, and send me to "eternal hell" My wife was a little "shocked" when I said - I no longer believe in a creator God, and that it is "we" that can determine our future existences. I am just being honest. I can no longer process that there is God capable of sending His own children to eternal damnation. If there is God who is compassion and merciful- I don't see any reason of condemnation just because we didn't just make it right this time.
    Anybody who had the same experience?

    Wonderful!

    Although I never subscribed to the idea of a creator god, mainly for the points you mentioned among others, practice has really helped me see a few things very clearly:

    There are no gaps in space.

    Everything is interconnected.

    Perception is reality, and imbuing your state of mind with positive qualities improves everyone's life and depth of peace.

    The universe is always making love.

    Being able to simply sit with clear mind is so wonderful. It took me a long time to experience that even on a brief level, but with daily practice it really accumulates, so don't slack!

    May goodness grow and grow, may insight deepen and deepen, and may all beings have the nutritive tastiness of deep meditation.

    Bunkslobster
  • ShoshinShoshin No one in particular Nowhere Special Veteran

    "The Beauty of Buddhism (is it a state of mind or just the way things are)"

    Is there a difference ?

  • It can be either subjectively. What would it mean that it is the way things are? Isn't everything the way things are?

  • Will_BakerWill_Baker Vermont Veteran

    @Shoshin said:
    "The Beauty of Buddhism (is it a state of mind or just the way things are)"

    Is there a difference ?

    -I believe there is, and it's the reason why I practice. It seems to me if we don't take care we might find ourselves existing within an illusion. With respect to this point, Plato's Allegory of the Cave hits near the mark. To a lesser degree the film the Matrix touches on it, but of course it's a commercialistic rip-off of Plato's allegory...

  • ShoshinShoshin No one in particular Nowhere Special Veteran

    @Will_Baker said:

    So are you in or out of the illusion now @Will_Baker?

  • Will_BakerWill_Baker Vermont Veteran

    In this moment both (I still have work to do) but I am inclined to be out of it...

  • ShoshinShoshin No one in particular Nowhere Special Veteran
    edited March 2015

    @Will_Baker said:
    In this moment both (I still have work to do) but I am inclined to be out of it...

    Don't we all......................... :)

    "There was a young man who said though, it seems that I know that I know, what I would like to see is the "I" that knows me, when I know that I know that I know!"

    Alan Watts

  • howhow Veteran

    @mockeymind

    I think.....
    The beauty of Buddhism is it's illumination of how subjective all beauty really is and that the transcendence of such subjectivity is where sufferings cause really finds it's resolution.

    And..

    The Buddha did not interfere with anyone's religious doctrine or beliefs.
    He simply taught 4 NT and the 8 FP as the truths that all were subject to.

    What you trouble with, the Buddha did not seem to think was germane to his teaching.

    ShoshinDhammaDragonlobster
  • DhammaDragonDhammaDragon Carpe Diem switzerland Veteran

    @mockeymind said:
    Another observation is that by practicing meditation, we begin to appreciate "silence" - I no longer enjoy in going to the mall and found parks are more attractive to me. Any place where I my mind find tranquility.

    My impression is not so much that I need silence, rather that I feel at ease both at the mall and in the park.
    I can find tranquility in either.
    Nirvana in Samsara.

    Shoshin
  • DavidDavid some guy The Hammer in Ontario, Canada, eh Veteran
    edited March 2015
    @mockeymind;

    I didn't really intend to fuel a fire (especially with your wife, lol) but to simply respond to your query. I'd recommend you keep on doing what you're doing how you're doing it.

    If somebody asks me about my impression of Abraham and his deity they could very well get offended but that's just me. You did, after all, ask if we had similar experiences with being jaded.

    Some people react the same way if asked about folks like Osho or Deepak Chopra and their ideas.
  • DhammaDragonDhammaDragon Carpe Diem switzerland Veteran
    The Buddha dismissed the God issue as an unprofitable question not conducive to cessation of suffering.
    I have lived perfectly happy without a God, so if it was fine by the Buddha, to boot, it's fine by me.
    lobster
  • @mockeymind said:

    Anybody who had the same experience?

    Yes.

    It is possible to take the peace and tranquility into bustle but that requires a maturing practice.

    Here is what an Olde Codger famously said:

    silverJeffreyDhammaDragonmockeymind
  • ShoshinShoshin No one in particular Nowhere Special Veteran
    edited March 2015

    @DhammaDragon said:
    My impression is not so much that I need silence, rather that I feel at ease both at the mall and in the park.
    I can find tranquility in either.
    Nirvana in Samsara.

    That's a good point @DhammaDragon ...Would meditation hold any real long term benefits if it could only be practised under certain conditions ie so called "Ideal conditions" in a tranquil idyllic setting... whereas on leaving this idyllic setting, all hell breaks loose again in the mind...One would just be creating a mental prison of sorts...

    lobsterDhammaDragon
  • DhammaDragonDhammaDragon Carpe Diem switzerland Veteran
    In several of his books, HH the Dalai Lama explains precisely that point, @Shoshin: that whatever practice you do, the idea is for it to help you lead a more fulfilled life IN the world, not to run for the hermit cave or use it to evade yourself from your daily life, whatever your setting happens to be.
    Shoshinlobster
  • @Shoshin - I guess that is what Buddhism always trying to teach- To get in out in everyday life peacefully. No matter what our circumstances are, meditation teach us to look in a different way, enable us to end suffering or at least how to start dealing with them.

    Prison seems broad in the practice. It is not necessarily mean physical but also mental or spiritual . Both Ajahn Chac and Bram perfectly illustrates that prison can be a state of mind- So it is the mind that defines what prison is.

    Shoshinlobster
  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator

    @lobster said: Yes.

    It is possible to take the peace and tranquility into bustle but that requires a maturing practice.

    Here is what an Olde Codger famously said:

    Not so old....

    Desiderata.

    how
  • SpinyNormanSpinyNorman It's still all old bollocks Veteran

    @mockeymind said:> Anybody who had the same experience?

    Yes, very similar. It's a fascinating journey.

Sign In or Register to comment.