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Bliss and sexual energy during meditation?

Hello New buddhists,

It's been a while since I posted here... hope you've all been well :)

I've been having some pretty cool experiences of bliss in my meditation lately and I'm just wondering if anyone has had similar experiences or knows what this is.

Basically at certain points when my mind is pretty focused I get waves of a beautiful energy coming through my body and a sense of hightened energy in my 2nd(?) Chakra.. the bliss feeling stays with me for a while after meditation and I seem to be really sensitive to vibrations like the sound of the bell. Anyway I'm really enjoying these experiences but just wondering if anyone has any insights?

Thanks

Grace

Comments

  • JeffreyJeffrey Veteran

    I would say enjoy them but know that they are impermanent. If they are 'experiences' then they are impermanent.

    dhammachicklobster
  • Invincible_summerInvincible_summer Heavy Metal Dhamma We(s)t coast, Canada Veteran

    I've had similar experiences, especially when I practice anapanasati.

    A quote from Ven. Thanissaro:

    When the Buddha describes concentration states, he doesn't use images of single-pointedness. He uses images of whole-body awareness. When a sense of rapture and pleasure comes from the breath, he tells you to knead that sense of rapture and pleasure through the whole body, the way you would knead water into flour to make dough. Another image is of the rapture welling up from within the body and filling the body just like a spring of cool water coming up from within a lake, filling the entire lake with its coolness... These are all images of whole-body awareness, of a sense of rapture, pleasure, or bright awareness filling the entire body. That's what you want to work on when you get to know the breath, because the type of awareness that allows insight to arise is not restricted to one point. When you're focused on one point and blot out everything else, that leaves a lot of blind spots in the mind. But when you try to get a more all-around awareness, it helps eliminate the blind spots. ...

    The talk goes on to give more detail, but basically these sensations can be used to your benefit.

    lobstersova
  • illusionillusion Explorer
    edited June 2015

    both are very natural,,could it be our views about them cause duality

    lobster
  • geniegenie Explorer
    edited June 2015

    @Jeffrey said:
    I would say enjoy them but know that they are impermanent. If they are 'experiences' then they are impermanent.

    As Buddhists, we know that everything is impermanent. However, that doesn't stop us from pursuing happiness or love or whatnot. Such is life. If you truly believed that everything is impermanent, you'd be in a monastery, not posting online.

    Earthninja
  • lobsterlobster Veteran

    @gracelee said:

    I've been having some pretty cool experiences of bliss in my meditation lately and I'm just wondering if anyone has had similar experiences or knows what this is.

    Cool!

    Perfectly natural. Not uncommon. Yes familiar with this.

    @Invincible_summer gave good advice. Become aware of bliss in whole body awareness.

    Bell producing bliss? What other sounds? You may find 'pleasant' sounds and eventually all sound is potentially blissful.

    Dharma and meditation is wonderful? Of course, don't say we didn't tell you so ... :)

    gracelee
  • JeffreyJeffrey Veteran
    edited June 2015

    @genie I think you are projecting the idea that I say not to have pleasure. In my post I said to enjoy the experience right?

    Do you truly believe that all experiences are impermanent? I do but I do not want to go to a monastery and leave my girlfriend and family (and pizza!). Also I am mentally ill and I don't know if I would be able to withstand the monastery life.

    DhammaDragon
  • silversilver In the beginning there was nothing, and then it exploded. USA, Left coast. Veteran

    @genie said "As Buddhists, we know that everything is impermanent. However, that doesn't stop us from pursuing happiness or love or whatnot. Such is life. If you truly believed that everything is impermanent, you'd be in a monastery, not posting online."

    ...

    I read this earlier and I just didn't know what to say -- but there is something toadally askew about it, especially the last sentence. It's as if you believe that monks are the only ones capable of observing the fact that stuff is impermanent. Makes no sense. O.o (Not to mention the snark)

    DhammaDragon
  • @gracelee said:> Basically at certain points when my mind is pretty focused I get waves of a beautiful energy coming through my body and a sense of hightened energy in my 2nd(?) Chakra.. the bliss feeling stays with me for a while after meditation and I seem to be really sensitive to vibrations like the sound of the bell.

    It sounds like piti, which is one of the jhana factors. It's a sign of progress, but don't get too attached to it.

    Invincible_summergraceleemmoroots
  • misecmisc1misecmisc1 I am a Hindu India Veteran

    @gracelee: can you provide some detail regarding how you approached it and how long did it take you to get the pleasant feeling in meditation? thanks in advance.

  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator

    @silver said:
    genie said "As Buddhists, we know that everything is impermanent. However, that doesn't stop us from pursuing happiness or love or whatnot. Such is life. If you truly believed that everything is impermanent, you'd be in a monastery, not posting online."

    ...

    I read this earlier and I just didn't know what to say -- but there is something toadally askew about it, especially the last sentence. It's as if you believe that monks are the only ones capable of observing the fact that stuff is impermanent. Makes no sense. O.o (Not to mention the snark)

    I think I might change 'genie's name to 'rainoneveryonesparade'... O.o...

    silver
  • DhammaDragonDhammaDragon Carpe Diem Recidivist Samsarist Veteran

    Yes, there is a feeling of bliss during meditation.
    Joy is one of the elements of enlightenment, after all.

    Whether of a sexual nature or not, I guess as usual, it depends on what personal baggage you are carrying in your subconscious mind and crops up during your meditation.

    As with any sensation, the main thing is to acknowledge it, gently brush it aside and not make it the focus of our meditation.
    It is a spin-off of meditation, not the meditation per se.

    federicaEarthninjasovagracelee
  • geniegenie Explorer

    @silver said:
    genie said "As Buddhists, we know that everything is impermanent. However, that doesn't stop us from pursuing happiness or love or whatnot. Such is life. If you truly believed that everything is impermanent, you'd be in a monastery, not posting online."

    ...

    I read this earlier and I just didn't know what to say -- but there is something toadally askew about it, especially the last sentence. It's as if you believe that monks are the only ones capable of observing the fact that stuff is impermanent. Makes no sense. O.o (Not to mention the snark)

    U have misunderstood. What I mean is this: if we really believe that everything is impermanent, we wouldn't have any attachment to this world. But we are attached, aren't we? One poster talked of impermanence, but the next moment admitted he was attached to the things of the world. Which means, all this talk of impermanence is only theoretical, we haven't actually experienced anything of significance.

  • WalkerWalker Veteran

    @genie said:
    U have misunderstood. What I mean is this: if we really believe that everything is impermanent, we wouldn't have any attachment to this world. But we are attached, aren't we? One poster talked of impermanence, but the next moment admitted he was attached to the things of the world. Which means, all this talk of impermanence is only theoretical, we haven't actually experienced anything of significance.

    Who's to say that a person doesn't realize or hasn't experienced what impermanence is? Everybody has experienced it, sure, some realize the significance of it more than others. Actually, to admit attachment is probably the first step we all need to take, no?

    JeffreyInvincible_summerDhammaDragon
  • lobsterlobster Veteran

    @genie said:
    U have misunderstood. What I mean is this: if we really believe that everything is impermanent, we wouldn't have any attachment to this world. But we are attached, aren't we?

    I certainly am.
    Being aware that what we think is temporary, transient and impermanent may give only transient release from our attached monkey mind/body complex ...

    One poster talked of impermanence, but the next moment admitted he was attached to the things of the world. Which means, all this talk of impermanence is only theoretical, we haven't actually experienced anything of significance.

    Significantly in Dharma there is a significant Middle Way beyond impermenant assertions and temporary assumptions. That is what I have found. However to become aware of The Way entails a little more than thought/belief/awareness/experiences ...

    ... and now back to the temporarily blissed blessed ...

  • @DhammaDragon said: It is a spin-off of meditation, not the meditation per se.

    It does depend on the type of meditation one is doing.

    lobsterInvincible_summer
  • Hi Thanks for all the comments :)

    I had an interesting experience with it today, I experience the bliss in every meditation at the moment sometimes it comes and goes 3 or 4 times in a session. today was particularly strong and after instead of the bliss feeling still being there I got a strong sense of energy.. full of energy in an almost unbearable way, I spent the day feeling uneasy and nervous that I might be going mad! I don't think it helped that I read something about spontaneous kundalini awakening and how dangerous it can be. anyway...I'm over it now I realise that fear of dying is common in meditation so I guess fear of madness must be too?? I am prone to anxiety and my family have a history of schizophrenia so I'm not going to be hard on myself for feeling a wee bit nervy.

    @misecmisc1 I have no idea how it happens! I'm certainly don't make it happen.. it just appears when I am fully concentrated on the breath. the one thing I can say is that it began happening on a week long silent retreat.

    Anywazzle - thank you all for your responses

    Grace

    lobster
  • lobsterlobster Veteran

    @gracelee said:

    I spent the day feeling uneasy and nervous that I might be going mad!

    Oh well. You might be. See doctor just in case. Could be worse, you might be going kundalini.

    I don't think it helped that I read something about spontaneous kundalini awakening and how dangerous it can be.

    Yes David 'the lizards are here' Icke had that syndrome.

    I spent many years on a kundalini forum. Insanity was very common. Stick with dharma and medication if required. Stay away from snake charming experts and other reptiles if possible, would be my advice. Really. <3

    gracelee
  • Yes thanks lobster :) kundalini is a bit out there to say the least! the dharma is def the way for me..I now feel certain that a) I am not a lizard and b) I'm not going mad. Thanks again xx

    lobster
  • JeffreyJeffrey Veteran

    how old are you @gracelee? Schizophrenia has typical onsets with respect to age. I experienced a lot of energy when I was first diagnosed.

  • DhammaDragonDhammaDragon Carpe Diem Recidivist Samsarist Veteran

    @genie said:
    U have misunderstood. What I mean is this: if we really believe that everything is impermanent, we wouldn't have any attachment to this world. But we are attached, aren't we? One poster talked of impermanence, but the next moment admitted he was attached to the things of the world. Which means, all this talk of impermanence is only theoretical, we haven't actually experienced anything of significance.

    No, there is nothing theoretical about our awareness of impermanence and the conflict of still being attached to the things of the world.
    It is a lifetime practice to gradually reduce the gap in our strife between both notions.

    lobster
  • @Jeffrey I'm 30... and I am certain I'm fine... my sister and dad are diagnosed were both diagnosed in there teens. I have anxiety and sometimes get intrusive thoughts so it's common for me to have a little worries like yesterday. Just gonna ho back to enjoying my bliss now :) thanks

    lobsterJeffrey
  • @gracelee said: Just gonna ho back to enjoying my bliss now :) thanks

    Piti can be quite energetic, I sometimes experience it like a persistent mild electric shock, very pleasant.

  • Invincible_summerInvincible_summer Heavy Metal Dhamma We(s)t coast, Canada Veteran

    @SpinyNorman said:
    Piti can be quite energetic, I sometimes experience it like a persistent mild electric shock, very pleasant.

    That's why I try and avoid doing meditation before I sleep - if I start experiencing piti, it can be hard to actually get any rest.

    gracelee
  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator

    And more's the pity....

    gracelee
  • I'm a sukkha for piti. ;)

    Invincible_summergracelee
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