Examples: Monday, today, last week, Mar 26, 3/26/04
Welcome home! Please contact lincoln@newbuddhist.com if you have any difficulty logging in or using the site. New registrations must be manually approved which may take up to 48 hours. Can't log in? Try clearing your browser's cookies.

Buddhism in Africa - Amitofo Care Center (ACC) Master Hui Li

NMADDPNMADDP SUN Diego, California Explorer

Amitofo Care Center (ACC) 阿彌陀佛關懷中心

A Brief insight into the life and work of venerable Master Hui Li (慧禮法師) - The driving force behind a revolutionary new approach to the orphans of Africa - providing them with an incredible environment in which they receive love, an education, and hope for their futures.

These Orphanages are being built across Africa - each working with the local community to create an environment where the orphans can prosper.

A Buddhist monk is taking a stand against poverty, giving hope to those who have no one else to turn to by building buddhist orphanages across Africa - teaching the kids an array of skills; from farming to mathematics, buddhism to biology, and preparing them for successful lives.

One of the skills that the orphans learn - to help build self-mastery, and a sense of pride and self worth - is Kung Fu.

Under the tutelage of Shaolin Monks, these children are becoming formidably skilled - and are using those skills to give back to the orphanage that they call home.

To find out how you can get involved and support the Amitofo Care Centres projects, visit:

English: http: //www.amitofocc.com/

Chinese: http: //www.acc.org.tw/

ACC Master Hui Li and his Kung Fu Kids

ACC children chanting Buddhism Heart Sutra in Mandarin

NamoAmitofo

Shoshinsilver

Comments

  • silversilver In the beginning there was nothing, and then it exploded. USA, Left coast. Veteran

    Thank you for sharing. This is very uplifting.

  • gracklegrackle Veteran

    What a wonderful story. It has reminded me once again of how widespread the efforts to help and comfort by the truly compassionate are.

  • gracklegrackle Veteran

    I think you make a very valid point. Though this is not exactly like Christian Missionaries striving to save the souls of the heathen and carry the white mans burden.

    There is on their website a message box. I don't how if the answer you would receive would address your concerns. Some of the Taiwanese in their outreach can seem very messianic. I know some of these people well. Some are on a mission to Buddify the world if you will.

  • lobsterlobster Veteran
    edited July 2016

    Too cynical @federica ... :3

    ... or the Chinese have a long term strategy to move its factories to a cheaper labour force than its own agriculture based poor. Guess where?

    So it will need people able to speak Mandarin, be aware of Chinese culture, ethics and indebted to Chinese self interest benevolence. A sort of kung fu fit middle management ...

    Happily this model is potentially kinder than the former colonial model ... which you partly mention in the following post ...
    http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article/chinas-investments-in-africa-whats-the-real-story/

    silverWalkerZero
  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator

    Christian Missionaries were very much in evidence even 25 years ago.
    When my eldest daughter was around 5, I adopted a young boy in Africa, via Christian Aid, and his name was Omuniakol Okhuru. I submitted all the paperwork, and began a monthly payment to Christian Aid, and subsequently, I received some pictures and a crudely-written (in a cute way!) little letter from the child, whose picture accompanied all the paperwork.
    I also had a cover letter from Christian Aid, who explained that 'my' ..."little boy, _Benjamin _ Omuniakol was happy and being looked after by a local family of Converts to Christianity." I quote the letter.
    I don't have the letter.
    I was so appalled by the tone and contents, that I called Christian Aid up, and asked them what would happen if somehow, I could not keep up with the monthly payments? They responded that care for the child would continue, and the funding would be taken over by the Charity.

    I withdrew my support and wrote and told them why.
    I received a reply explaining that adoption into the church and conversion to Christianity was standard policy, and part of the programme. They could not legitimately do their work, if part of their work (Ministering, proselytising and gathering 'sheep to the fold') was compromised or suspended.

    However, I believe this charity has since ceased this practice. But I detail it to highlight that "Christian Missionaries striving to save the souls of the heathen and carry the white mans burden" are not confined to the glorious Victorian epoch, and the ancient pages of History.

    And I think this Pure Land practice is similar, and it leaves me uneasy, as does the whole Sect

    "It is also noted for its hardline opposition to any other form of Buddhism, which Nichiren saw as deviating from the Buddhist truth he had discovered."

    From here.

  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator

    Basically, this sect is doubtless helping hundreds, maybe thousands of young children, undeniably in need of care and support. But it has in its grasp thousands of young minds which can be honed, moulded and 'programmed' to follow a single specific line of thinking which to me, smacks a little of brainwashing.

    silver
  • gracklegrackle Veteran

    My own experience with the Chinese Pure Land is that it is not a stand alone practice. It is often practiced with other forms. But the Chinese seem to like these combinations and certainly see no contradictions. But I'm just an old gwai-loh. So what can I know.

  • silversilver In the beginning there was nothing, and then it exploded. USA, Left coast. Veteran
    edited July 2016

    I get your concern, @Federica. but aren't we all 'brainwashed' (conditioned) no matter where we're born and to whom? I think a lot of us are able to come out from our conditioning to varying degrees as we mature, but if we got to choose...

  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator

    @grackle said:
    My own experience with the Chinese Pure Land is that it is not a stand alone practice. It is often practiced with other forms. But the Chinese seem to like these combinations and certainly see no contradictions. But I'm just an old gwai-loh. So what can I know.

    "Gwai-loh" is a Chinese Pidgin-English pronunciation of 'yellow' if I'm not much mistaken. I read Martin Booth's book. Sadly, he died in 2004, but the book was brilliant...(However, I could be wrong about the Pidgin-English bit. His book title is actually "Gweilo"....)

    I digress. Your comment took me outside the box.
    Apologies.

  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator
    edited July 2016

    @silver said:
    I get your concern, @Federica. but aren't we all 'brainwashed' (conditioned) no matter where we're born and to whom?

    No, I don't think we are. First of all, we're not taken from our social circle into an institutionalised existence 24/7. Secondly, we are open to all manner of different influences.

    I think a lot of us are able to come out from our conditioning to varying degrees as we mature, but if we got to choose...

    Sure, because we had choices we would make. We had different bytes of information to analyse, digest and discern.
    Doesn't look as if these children have those options.

    True to say though that in any institution providing a "Good" environment, you will always get the 'rotten apple" failure... no institution ever has a 100% success rate...

  • gracklegrackle Veteran

    I have been referred to a gwai-loh a few times. Meaning a barbarian not capable of much understanding. So I came up with this little ditty, Hi ho,Hi ho I'm just a bad qwai-loh. It did raise a few eyebrows.

    federica
  • SpinyNormanSpinyNorman It's still all old bollocks Veteran

    @federica said: However, I believe this charity has since ceased this practice. But I detail it to highlight that "Christian Missionaries striving to save the souls of the heathen and carry the white mans burden" are not confined to the glorious Victorian epoch, and the ancient pages of History. And I think this Pure Land practice is similar, and it leaves me uneasy, as does the whole Sect

    Yes, it raises some tricky questions. Years ago I supported a Tibetan boy in Dharamsala, I think he was an orphan being looked after by monks, which seemed OK to me.

  • NMADDPNMADDP SUN Diego, California Explorer

    One comment from the interview video part 1 raises the same question/concern also.
    **
    Ven. Hui-Li interivew in 2011 (5 parts)**




    Fill the World with Love (2011)

  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator

    Thanks.
    I'm even less impressed now.

    He's given himself a 300-year project?
    "The one who deserves my pity also deserves my hatred"...?

    I haven't had the time to watch them all, but so far, (not) so good....

  • silversilver In the beginning there was nothing, and then it exploded. USA, Left coast. Veteran

    I've watched the first one most of the way (up until the kid sings).
    Yeah that is a laugh - a 300-year project.
    I think in spite of his saying how bad the western world is for taking advantage of Africa's riches without improving the lives of the slaves, the teachings of kung fu and other stuff will be of great benefit to the kids just for their own learning discipline etc.
    China also has become westernized - and yet their own history is chock-full of horrible things done by the rulers so I don't know where he gets off saying the West is worse.

    federica
  • gracklegrackle Veteran

    Welcome to the world of Fo Guang Shan. They actually try hard to create meaningful change. As the Chinese Mahayana is a separate world unto itself sometimes you just have to take some of it seriously some not. Also Fo Guang Shan is very influenced by major players in Taiwan.

    @silver. Where you thinking about death by a thousand cuts?

  • I like the stylized Buddha cutouts on the first picture of the orphanage.

    I'm not so worried about the cultural trappings of the Chinese orphanages. While stories of children being ripped from their families and forced to learn another language and religion and culture have given us a bad taste for missionary schools, I also have to consider that most African countries do not have social programs to care for orphans. And since many of these orphans are the result of civil wars and migrant refugee populations, it's not likely the local governments will step up to help out the street kids in the future. I guess I look at the alternative, and feel I can't be the one to judge.

    They're clean, fed, educated, and provided a stable environment. If they're not abused (I'm thinking of the terrible Irish orphanages) then they can make a decision later in life what they want to do. It's not like the Chinese want a foreign labor force. They want the raw material and places to put their mines and factories, and they export their own Chinese laborers to work the mines and such. I suppose time will tell.

  • silversilver In the beginning there was nothing, and then it exploded. USA, Left coast. Veteran

    @grackle said:
    Welcome to the world of Fo Guang Shan. They actually try hard to create meaningful change. As the Chinese Mahayana is a separate world unto itself sometimes you just have to take some of it seriously some not. Also Fo Guang Shan is very influenced by major players in Taiwan.

    @silver. Where you thinking about death by a thousand cuts?

    You'll have to explain to me what that means.

  • gracklegrackle Veteran

    Death by a thousand cuts was a punishment performed in public to indicate extreme Imperial disfavor. It did not end until the national revolution under Dr. Sun Yet Sen.

  • ShoshinShoshin No one in particular Nowhere Special Veteran

    Master Hui Li is from "Taiwan" not mainland China...

    Cinorjer
  • gracklegrackle Veteran

    Who has said he was not from Taiwan?

  • ShoshinShoshin No one in particular Nowhere Special Veteran

    No one........ But I just thought it's important to keep this in mind when discussing this thread...

  • @Shoshin said:
    Master Hui Li is from "Taiwan" not mainland China...

    I actually wasn't aware of that. The Shau-Lin Monks reference threw me off. I know that temple is in China.

    Shoshin
  • ZeroZero Veteran

    Africans are not a simple, innocent people, closer related to our supposed hominid ancestors.
    L'enfer est plein de bonnes volontes ou desirs.

  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator

    Nest-ce pas...?

  • SpinyNormanSpinyNorman It's still all old bollocks Veteran

    Ou est la gare?

    lobster
  • lobsterlobster Veteran
    edited July 2016

    @federica said:
    Basically, this sect is doubtless helping hundreds, maybe thousands of young children, undeniably in need of care and support. But it has in its grasp thousands of young minds which can be honed, moulded and 'programmed' to follow a single specific line of thinking which to me, smacks a little of brainwashing.

    We are all brainwashed ahem ... socialised.

    Ideally we learn to read and that of course gives us access to knowledge and hopefully choices. The kids are already displaying a very high level of physical mastership. So their physical needs are taken care of. Will they have internet when they are older and access to deviant dharma threads? I hope so. :)

    Evangelical Buddhist indoctrination is not my preferred education model. Secular education devoid of lamaism, islamism, creationism, patriotism, capitalism, communism or fish propaganda would be my ideal ... But hey, this is DukkhaWorld not Disney Academy ...

    We do what we can ... <3

    Kerome
  • KeromeKerome Love, love is mystery The Continent Veteran

    I don't think you can get entirely away from -ism's at school. I was educated mostly at Steiner schools and even there there was a noticeable Christian influence... Although it was counterbalanced by time spent at Osho communes, lol.

    But even such a thing as a focus on "mind studies" versus physical education and arts and crafts training leaves it's mark, mostly as a tendency towards scientific materialism. Which is the most successful paradigm of our times and a worthy one in defeating millennia of superstition, but it comes at the cost of a balanced view on spirituality.

    I can imagine secular Buddhism being very successful as an educational system though...

Sign In or Register to comment.