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living-in-the-moment

what does the living-in-the-moment mean to you?

Comments

  • silversilver In the beginning there was nothing, and then it exploded. USA, Left coast. Veteran

    To me, livinginthemoment is the same as how I would define mindfulness or mindfulness practice. You're as aware as you are capable of, listening to the sounds, smelling the aromas (or whatever), seeing (watching) whatever is there to watch, etc.

    lobsternamarupaCinorjer
  • I would like to understand and define it as how it might be related to Buddhist practice, that being to see things as they are at the present moment and at all times. But a layman's definition might be something like to live spontaneuosly for the thrill of each moment, seize the day.

    herbertoShoshin
  • misecmisc1misecmisc1 I am a Hindu India Veteran

    just being.

    ShoshinCinorjer
  • pegembarapegembara Veteran
    edited August 2016

    We are at all times living in the moment. Regardless of whether we are remembering the past or imagining the future, these things are happening now. All objects are present objects. Calling them the past or future does not change that fact. There is only simply this moment.

    If not now, when?

    It's now or never.

    misecmisc1herbertoShoshinCinorjer
  • ShoshinShoshin No one in particular Nowhere Special Veteran
    edited August 2016

    @upekka said:
    what does the living-in-the-moment mean to you?

    Going with the flow

  • SpinyNormanSpinyNorman It's still all old bollocks Veteran

    @upekka said:
    what does the living-in-the-moment mean to you?

    Seeing that every moment is unique. It's exciting!

    Cinorjer
  • DavidDavid some guy The Hammer in Ontario, Canada, eh Veteran

    Giving attention and compassion to what is happening right now. Being fully there and not day dreaming or thinking about random whatevers.

    Cinorjer
  • genkakugenkaku Northampton, Mass. U.S.A. Veteran

    Anyone trying to live somewhere else knows how well that works. I mean, I tried it once -- greeting a colleague with, "Good morning. Today I am living in Australia and I am a kangaroo." Later he assured me that he just assumed I was nursing a major-league hangover.

    herbertoCinorjerRuddyDuck9
  • herbertoherberto Arizona Explorer

    I'm quoting here but I can't remember who said it. Between the future and the past there is a very small space that is now. I find living in the moment to be very freeing. I'm certainly no guru, but what small success that I've had in applying Buddhist principles to my life has brought me lot of happiness. Yesterday for instance, I was babysitting my 4 year old grandson. I enjoyed and savored every moment. I missed a lot when my kids were growing up because I was preoccupied with myself and my problems. I was blind to almost everything else, now I'm awakening.

  • karastikarasti Breathing Minnesota Veteran

    I know people who are unhappy in their present life so they live in the past. It is very sad. Remembering a moment is one thing. Living in it is another. He is 40 years old, he is married with 2 kids but he is unhappy. All he talks about is how much he loved high school, he misses the truck he drove then, he misses the fun, he wishes he could go back. He appreciates little about his current life and it is passing him by.

    To me, living in the moment is simply appreciating each thing that happens as it is and for what it is. I try to get away from labeling things as pleasant or unpleasant and just let them be. I try to learn to view things I dislike in another way. My son and his friends are very loud when they come to our house to play. I have to remind myself of all of the positive things they are building and engaging in, and being crabby about the noise is my problem. Do I choose to be crabby? Or do I choose to be grateful that he has friends, they they are joyful, that the worries of the world do not weigh them down, that they are learning communication and building trust in people?

    I frequently pause during the day and just look at "what is" all around me. It makes the world and all its inhabitants much more fascinating. There is more joy in it than focusing on myself and my discomforts. I then become part of the large web of life at play rather than an outsider observing it and letting it cause unsatisfactoriness in myself.

    silverCinorjerlobsterRuddyDuck9
  • genkakugenkaku Northampton, Mass. U.S.A. Veteran

    My teacher's teacher once commented, "There is birth and there is death. In between is enlightenment." From that day to this, I have never been able to lay a hand on "between."

    herbertoCinorjerRuddyDuck9
  • NamadaNamada Veteran
    edited August 2016

    To be awake and observe whats happening now in the present moment its the only thing that matter, you can accept what is happening or you can deny it. Accepting needs an open mind and true wisdom. To deny it is to use Your ignorance. So we have freedom to choose between these two, every moment..its some kind of freedom.

    silverShoshinCinorjer
  • ShoshinShoshin No one in particular Nowhere Special Veteran

    Non attachment...

    Cinorjernamarupa
  • I guess if pressed, I'd say for me living in the moment is letting go of both the future and past and just doing what's right in the present. We drive ourselves crazy worrying about the future and trying to cram our lives into the future we want. We also screw up our lives dragging the past along with us, dwelling on the many times we've been hurt or disappointed and letting that control what we do today.

    It's not easy, walking the middle way between ignoring the past and future, and doing what we can in the moment while not holding on.

    Shoshinnamarupa
  • @upekka said:
    what does the living-in-the-moment mean to you?

    To me as a non-kangaroo, it is very much tied with mindfulness. A Buddhist, 'returning to the present moment' every day and eventually/increasingly an entry into a more complete and fulfilling being. It is mainstream now. No dharma required:

    http://oxfordmindfulness.org

    The UAE are sending 'happiness officers' to train at Oxford University (see above link for one of their training camps) and bring the joy back into unfashionable Islam.
    http://www.emirates247.com/news/emirates/uae-selects-60-chief-happiness-officers-2016-07-31-1.637317

    Wot a plan! A mine field or mind field of potential good to counter the fear terrorists such as Jihadhi tRump and Islamic State Mafia ... :p

    @Cinorjer said:
    It's not easy, walking the middle way between ignoring the past and future, and doing what we can in the moment while not holding on.

    Indeed.
    As an almost Buddhist, I have a past ID and possibly a future but definitely can ride with the present ...

    This message was approved by Mr Cushion

    CinorjerRuddyDuck9Namada
  • RuddyDuck9RuddyDuck9 MD, USA Veteran

    Once when I was at university, getting ready to graduate, someone asked me what I had planned for after graduation, I told them I was preparing for the "real world" by doing x, y, z, etc... they looked at me very seriously and told me,

    "Don't ever let anyone tell you that where you are right now isn't the real world."

    It was a really intense experience, I think I was only 21 at the time, and had no concept of what living in the moment really was. I think that little encounter was probably one of the most important little pieces of advice I have ever been given. Because at the time I was running around looking at a future which had no bearing on what I was doing in the now. If I'm not right here right now, where the heck am I?

    silverCinorjerlobster
  • FosdickFosdick in its eye are mirrored far off mountains Alaska, USA Veteran

    Right now, in this moment, time does not exist. We are aware of time, but yet detached from it and it has no power over us. Sometimes I think of this when I find myself becoming impatient or hurried. Stupid damned wristwatch!

    silverCinorjerShoshinRuddyDuck9
  • @RuddyDuck9 said:
    Once when I was at university, getting ready to graduate, someone asked me what I had planned for after graduation, I told them I was preparing for the "real world" by doing x, y, z, etc... they looked at me very seriously and told me,

    "Don't ever let anyone tell you that where you are right now isn't the real world."

    It was a really intense experience, I think I was only 21 at the time, and had no concept of what living in the moment really was. I think that little encounter was probably one of the most important little pieces of advice I have ever been given. Because at the time I was running around looking at a future which had no bearing on what I was doing in the now. If I'm not right here right now, where the heck am I?

    Once when I was at meditation retreat, getting ready to leave, someone asked me what I had planned to do after the retreat. The thought occurred - Which is the "real" world? Am I leaving the real for the unreal or the opposite?

    ShoshinCinorjerlobsterRuddyDuck9
  • TheBeejAbidesTheBeejAbides Human Being Veteran

    Without judgement, residing as the wave, unaware of time, laughing. =)

    Shoshinsilver
  • possibilitiespossibilities PNW, WA State Veteran
    edited August 2016

    Living in the moment....

    I'd say owning your current circumstance with no excuses.

    This includes good and bad parts of one's life, mistakes and successes. It's all fluid: from failure can grow insight and progress, and success can turn into failure and be the basis for new leaning experience. Living in the now allows for conscious recognition of where you are at currently.
    It includes reflections of the past as a matter of learning but not dwelling on issues, and it includes plans for the future based on current circumstance, but not unrealistic pipe dreams.

    IMO, the Now is not measured in seconds and minutes but is a process of evolution, marked by elements of quality (pos and neg) that define the intersection of coming and going.

    Shoshin
  • SpinyNormanSpinyNorman It's still all old bollocks Veteran
    edited August 2016

    @pegembara said:> Once when I was at meditation retreat, getting ready to leave, someone asked me what I had planned to do after the retreat. The thought occurred - Which is the "real" world? Am I leaving the real for the unreal or the opposite?

    I am shallow and dwell on thoughts of real ice-cream in such moments. :p

    pegembaraRuddyDuck9dhammachick
  • BexMBexM U.K. New

    Laying in bed with my family, my children this morning. All having a cuddle as we didn't have to get up yet. Peace and tranquility and silence, just enjoying the moment. At the time I thought "we are safe, we are happy" and happiness and gratitude for that moment. Memory making.

  • KeromeKerome Did I fall in the forest? Europe Veteran

    Not letting the mind take over. If you can be in the here and now, giving your attention to the people with you, and not be dragged off by the mind following this-or-that, then you are doing well.

    Note that this makes conversation an interesting process. To be truly aware and in the moment, means that one is often allowing the mind to make conversation independently.

  • @upekka said:
    what does the living-in-the-moment mean to you?

    Bodhi Carl Jung, the well known alchemist and shrink, developed the idea of synchronicity. That every moment was of the nature of its relationship to the totality of experience. Unfortunately the 'meaningful' events are the ones that draw us into that experience. In the moment we are in constant awareness of synchronicity ...

  • NamadaNamada Veteran
    edited December 2016

    what does the living-in-the-moment mean to you?

    Nothing, its empty. No one is here ;)

  • Living in this moment is simply realizing that all the muck and the clarity have enough space to abide as one. Awareness of awareness. Living in the moment means accepting that my selflessness is usually both preceded and subsequently rewarded by my selfishness. Being present means being a work in progress. @genkaku, that kangaroo bit reminded me of an old reference to a "hideous orangutan" - my own alter ego....

  • DavidDavid some guy The Hammer in Ontario, Canada, eh Veteran

    Fluid and not jerky.

    lobster
  • Good way of putting it @David - attendance and attention.
    Again why the trained mind, not the one constantly being jerked around, is so important to unfold.

    The idea of flow (fluid) works well.
    http://tinybuddha.com/blog/living-in-the-now-when-its-stressful-4-mindfulness-tips/

  • For me it means THIS, NOW. Untainted of past thoughts and future worries.

    lobsterDhammikadhammachick
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