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Zen Archery

ShoshinShoshin No one in particularNowhere Special Veteran

I came across this gem earlier today and just thought I'd share.... (I put in the meditation section...for reasons that will become apparent,,,,after watching the video:) )

Looking beyond the superb bowmanship...what comes to mind?
for me it was "Patience" "Concentration" "Moment by Moment" "MindFULNESS in motion"

Rodrigo

Comments

  • genkakugenkaku Northampton, Mass. U.S.A. Veteran
    edited August 2016

    Interesting: Research shows, I believe, that archery was never a Zen pastime until after "Zen and the Art of Archery." (1948) But that doesn't mean the notion hasn't taken hold... sorta like the "unbroken lineage" tale sects can allege their institutions rest on. I can hear the crooning now: "All the way back to Shakyamuni Buddha...."

    Oh well.....

    Shoshinlobster
  • KeromeKerome Love, love is mystery The Continent Veteran

    Unfortunately it is one of those sports which is not as popular anymore as it used to be... I once did a course of Zen archery, it was fun to learn about and do for a while.

  • ShoshinShoshin No one in particular Nowhere Special Veteran

    It would seem Zen or not Zen...the mindful actions are worthy of appreciation :)

    "Kyudo practice as all budō includes the idea of moral and spiritual development. Today many archers practise kyudo as a sport, with marksmanship being paramount. However, the goal most devotees of kyudo seek is seisha seichū, "correct shooting is correct hitting". In kyudo the unique action of expansion (nobiai) that results in a natural release, is sought. When the technique of the shooting is correct the result is that the arrow hits the target. To give oneself completely to the shooting is the spiritual goal, achieved by perfection of both the spirit and shooting technique leading to munen musō, "no thoughts, no illusions". This however is not Zen, although Japanese bow can be used in Zen-practice or kyūdō practiced by a Zen-master. In this respect, many kyudo practitioners believe that competition, examination, and any opportunity that places the archer in this uncompromising situation is important, while other practitioners will avoid competitions or examinations of any kind.

    Since the Second World War kyudo has often been associated with Zen Buddhism. But not all kyudo schools include a religious or spiritual component. This popular view is likely the result of a single book Zen in the Art of Archery (1948) by the German author Eugen Herrigel. Herrigel spoke only a little Japanese, generally using a translator to speak with his teacher. His view on kyudo was in part due to mis-communication and also to his exposure to a contemplative form of kyudo. Even so, Herrigel's book, when translated into Japanese in 1956, had a huge impact on perception of kyudo also in Japan."

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kyūdō

  • I read the Eugen Herrigel book when I was a pre teen. Made perfect sense and started my interest in martial Dharma arts and Dudeism Taoism zennism.

    As a formal training in meditative action, slowed deliberate body-mind activity from tea drinking to taking out the garbage ... and even if very advanced computer simulations of Zelda on the Wii - wonderful.

    However simulation it is ...

  • It sounds like another of those "getting in the zone" things. I am a failed archer, but used to be pretty good with an SLR.

  • SwaroopSwaroop India Veteran

    @SpinyNorman said:
    It sounds like another of those "getting in the zone" things. I am a failed archer, but used to be pretty good with an SLR.

    Rifle or camera?

  • @Swaroop said:

    @SpinyNorman said:
    It sounds like another of those "getting in the zone" things. I am a failed archer, but used to be pretty good with an SLR.

    Rifle or camera?

    Rifle.

  • SwaroopSwaroop India Veteran
    edited August 2016

    @SpinyNorman said:

    @Swaroop said:

    @SpinyNorman said:
    It sounds like another of those "getting in the zone" things. I am a failed archer, but used to be pretty good with an SLR.

    Rifle or camera?

    Rifle.

    Zen and the art of killing total strangers, eh?

    Steve_B
  • SpinyNormanSpinyNorman Veteran
    edited August 2016

    @Swaroop said:

    @SpinyNorman said:

    @Swaroop said:

    @SpinyNorman said:
    It sounds like another of those "getting in the zone" things. I am a failed archer, but used to be pretty good with an SLR.

    Rifle or camera?

    Rifle.

    Zen and the art of killing total strangers, eh?

    What do you think bows and arrows were used for, prior to sport?

  • karastikarasti Breathing Minnesota Veteran

    People can be good with weapons without killing anything, ever.
    I quite enjoy archery, I have never used it to kill anyone though. I also am not very good at it, and usually end up bruising my forearm because I forget to bend my elbow. But it's still fun, lol. I quite enjoyed the Olympic archery. I am a decent shot with a gun as well, but the only thing I shoot is paper plates.

  • BrownbuddhaBrownbuddha Osaka, Japan Explorer
    edited August 2016

    THE ZEN ARCHERY, statement will get a lot of peoples undies all twisted! there is a group that understands the Use of the term and practice "Kyudo" for meditation, as a Zen tool. There are others who have a cow at the mention of Zen and Kyudo in the same breath. I have a San-Dan ( 3rd degree Black Belt ) in traditional Japanese Federation Kyudo, I am also a Chan ( Zen ) monk. I understand both views having done both paths and think it is silly to make a big deal about it. The arrow , nor the bow, nor the target care if a Zen mind is shooting or a Budo mind is shooting. If you get hit with ether arrow you are in a world of hurt! The funny thing is Japanese do not care what you call it. Only westerners do. Traditionally though, "kyudo" is more tied to Shinto than Zen. Still it really is just a label, a finger pointing to the moon.

    I am going to post this video on the Kyudo board just to see who gets bent out of shape from the title , BAwahahahahahahah!

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