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Sensitivity

Even though I am delicious, as a wer-lobster, I have a hard shell.

Compassion is a result of sensitivity and I would suggest Buddhist training makes us more sensitive. Sensitive does not mean overly emotional, sentimental and hippy like. [long live the hippys :3 - sorry could not help myself].

How do we get this balance of real world pragmatism and compassion for the dukkha of ducks and other sensitive sentients?

My solutions would include:

  • Grounding practices

  • Visits to the hell realms or shopping mall, whichever is nearer.

  • Real life, no escaping that one, unless a Sangha uniformed member, which might be too close to hell for some ;)
  • Transmutation practices such as the 9 fold path (includes upgrades) or tonglen.

What is your feeling on this?
http://www.lionsroar.com/profile-against-the-streama/

Shoshin

Comments

  • personperson Where is my mind? 'Merica! Veteran

    For me its been about coming to grips with my own suffering and then understanding through contemplation that others have pain and suffering very similar to mine.

    Shoshinlobster
  • ShoshinShoshin No one in particular Nowhere Special Veteran

    How do we get this balance of real world pragmatism and compassion for the dukkha of ducks and other sensitive sentients?

    By diligently practising the Dharma and not over-intellectualising :)

    I found the article in the link about the "Against The Stream Buddhist Meditation Society " interesting ....I like the promotion of "inclusiveness" :)

  • FosdickFosdick in its eye are mirrored far off mountains Alaska, USA Veteran

    For me, at this moment, compassion seems to arise from deep mindfulness. A pity there is no pill for that ...

    lobster
  • @person said:
    For me its been about coming to grips with my own suffering and then understanding through contemplation that others have pain and suffering very similar to mine.

    Exactly. B)
    Just being sensitised or open to our dukkha and wallowing in our or others is just emotional dukkha indulgence. Not skilful. Care or sensitivity if skilful, requires equinimity, dispassion if you will. Then it involves a way of active being - the path. Otherwise we become more sensitive/open/aware and unable to cope ...

    I like to include the Trumpettes and other well meaning hell dwellers in my circle of contemplation. >:) However never laugh at a demon, it's not sensitive and only confuses or enrages them ... However all that heat and they eventually burn themselves out ... which is kinda funny ... o:)

  • KeromeKerome Did I fall in the forest? Europe Veteran

    Mindfulness, awareness of others, and the four noble truths do automatically sensitise you to the suffering of others, although it does depend how steadfast you are in your application of these. For me, being truly mindful and aware is like an internal stretch, the tendency is there to slowly fall back into old patterns of 'not looking' and 'not internalising'.

    So how much of other people's suffering you bring inside is I think up to you. Certain things will be familiar to you and easy to process, and other things may require some puzzling out before you find out where things fit and should be dealt with.

    For me, things which I can't cope with I let go of. Mindfulness brings it to me, and if I don't recognise the source of their suffering then I release it again, and carry on focussed on other things.

    lobster
  • @Fosdick said:
    For me, at this moment, compassion seems to arise from deep mindfulness. A pity there is no pill for that ...

    There are no shortcuts to the arising of genuine compassion, which is engagement not syrupy empathy ...
    There are degrees of compassion. The first is undoubtedly compassion for our personal dukkha. We practice some form of mindful dharma engagement to overcome our first student. Guess who? Ms monk key mindlessness. In other words the runaway train.

    Monkey mind is a subtle companion. Train her and she will jump through hoops but who is doing the jumping?
    http://www.buddhanet.net/oxherd1.htm

    Fosdick
  • FosdickFosdick in its eye are mirrored far off mountains Alaska, USA Veteran

    Sometimes not so subtle. Every now and then I see that little bugger stalking around here with a cattle prod - but if you sit quietly, she can't see you.

    lobster
  • ^^. Quite right.
    Should have used crafty, sly or chameleon-like instead of 'subtle'.

    Monkey mind, conciousness based on Pratītyasamutpāda is all we are ... until we are quiet.
    "When this is, that is; This arising, that arises; When this is not, that is not; This ceasing, that ceases."

    upekka
  • Suiseki7Suiseki7 Pennsylvania, USA Explorer

    My Insensitivity is rooted almost if not totally in ego. The 3 Poisons of Passion, Aggression and Ignorance either alone, or in some varying degree of combination. Mind is perfect equanimity and compassion which can be nothing but sensitivity made manifest thus seeing oneself as all forms, including especially others. =)

    lobsterupekka
  • As @Suiseki7 says, our lack of genuine sensitivity is based on the swamped mind. The distorted filter that we cling to as capable of rational/able/skilful thought.

    As we move towards an emptying of this gibbering idiot my-mind, we find quite naturally and inevitably a sensitive mind is not fragile but clear.

    Such a stillness is perturbed/compassionate towards the agitated ...

  • loving kindness - compassion - sympathetic joy - equanimity

    do they indicate gradual reduction of sensitivity

    or

    development of mindfulness with wisdom?

  • Very much the second @uppeka

    • you get the first load as an inevitable bonus

    Mindfullness is 'dharma through being'. Not just a productivity enhancement tactic.

    Be perfect, therefore, as your heavenly Father Buddha Nature is perfect.
    http://biblehub.com/matthew/5-48.htm

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