Examples: Monday, today, last week, Mar 26, 3/26/04
Welcome home! Please contact lincoln@newbuddhist.com if you have any difficulty logging in or using the site. New registrations must be manually approved which may take up to 48 hours. Can't log in? Try clearing your browser's cookies.

Buddha Nature

JaySonJaySon Everywhere in the Cosmos Veteran
edited January 13 in Philosophy

We are fortunate to have Buddha nature at our core.

Living in a moral universe.

Universal compassion our natural state.

Emptiness the harmonious truth beyond delusion.

Radiant, pure minds beneath our defilements.

personBunksherbertolobsterShoshin

Comments

  • JaySonJaySon Everywhere in the Cosmos Veteran

    You made me think of TNH's teaching about storehouse consciousness and how there are both positive seeds and negative seeds there. You choose which ones to water.

    herbertoZenCanuck
  • JaySonJaySon Everywhere in the Cosmos Veteran

    @Dakini said:

    @federica said:
    Sadly, we're also unfortunate to have Mara-Nature at our core.

    Living in an amoral world.

    Suffering: Greed, Hatred and Ignorance our cultivated state.

    Resistant to the Emptiness which is the reality of existence.

    Dulled, impure minds obscure the radiant Purity.

    So:
    Which wolf will win?
    The one we feed....

    Yes. I would say, we live in a complex Universe. It's neither moral nor immoral. It simply is. It's humans that bring their nature to it, and make the world what it is: both moral and immoral. It's human nature to try to find meaning in life. Some cultivate morality and compassion in that effort. Others cultivate greed, fame, ego. Some lost souls feel life has no meaning ("you're born, life's a ___, and then you die"), and kind of free-float through life.

    We, here, are fortunate to have found the Dharma. IMHO.

    I'd have to disagree in part.

    This is a moral universe, meaning you reap what you sow, meaning karma.

    I believe we're lucky to live in such a universe.

    herberto
  • JaySonJaySon Everywhere in the Cosmos Veteran

    Also, I disagree in part about the nature of the mind.

    When you expel the hindrances from your mind during single pointed meditation, you experience an uncontaminated mind beneath all the hindrances.

    This is the natural mind I'm talking about.

    It has been untouched by the defilements and it is bright.

    person
  • upekkaupekka Veteran

    @JaySon said:
    You made me think of TNH's teaching about storehouse consciousness and how there are both positive seeds and negative seeds there. You choose which ones to water.

    store consciousness gives the names to all thoughts (sight, sound, etc.)
    when we know the thought/seed (sights, sound, etc.) it is already gone/died (impermanent)

    since we do not know that we choose to water them/thinking

    that is what we call samsara

    herberto
  • DakiniDakini Veteran

    @JaySon said:

    I'd have to disagree in part.

    This is a moral universe, meaning you reap what you sow, meaning karma.

    I believe we're lucky to live in such a universe.

    Karma doesn't always work in discernable ways, though. There are the cases we all hear about, and some of us encounter in life directly, in which the jerks, the con-artists, and their ilk seem to reap only rewards, and slither out of any negative consequences headed their way. In cases like that, we can only take it on faith that they'll get their come-uppance in the next lifetime, or after that. But not all Buddhists believe in rebirth. I think it wounds or frustrates our sense of justice when we see immoral people reap rewards without facing the consequences of their actions.

    wojciech
  • TiggerTigger Toronto, Canada Veteran

    I think you're both right, interesting enough.

    I used to think that I needed some kind of physical proof that someone reaped what they sewed (i.e. losing a good job because of theft or loosing a political career because of a scandal) but then I thought to myself that even if there is no evidence of a consequence maybe their own suffering (for whatever reason) is their sewed seeds. Just because someone has a great job or lots of money doesn't mean that they are happy so maybe some lose where we can see and some loose where we cannot (i.e. personal demons, depression, alcoholism, their children won't talk to them, drug addiction....the list goes on and on)

    Lonely_Traveller
  • TiggerTigger Toronto, Canada Veteran

    Personally, I have seen very few rich entitled people or people that should reap what they sewed that look truly happy (IMO)

    Lonely_TravellerZenCanuck
  • TiggerTigger Toronto, Canada Veteran

    Is there a difference between suffering because you lost your job or riches and suffering because you suffer (depression because you're a bad person or alcoholism for the same reason)

  • I'd have to disagree in part.

    Which karmically means partial agreement

    This is a moral universe,

    Que? Is this assumed?

    I believe we're lucky to live in such a universe.

    Compared to not living ... maybe so ...

    @JaySon said:
    We are fortunate to have Buddha nature at our core.

    Living in a moral universe.

    Universal compassion our natural state.

    Emptiness the harmonious truth beyond delusion.

    Radiant, pure minds beneath our defilements.

    Our living core is empty
    Our natural state has no qualities
    Harmony and disharmony have no truth
    Nothing beneath, nothing above, all pure mind ...

    Lonely_Traveller
  • just_sojust_so Explorer

    Moral><Immoral
    What exactly is in between?

  • JaySonJaySon Everywhere in the Cosmos Veteran

    @lobster said:

    I believe we're lucky to live in such a universe.

    Compared to not living ... maybe so ...

    Imagine the opposite and you have your answer.

  • JaySonJaySon Everywhere in the Cosmos Veteran
    edited January 14

    @lobster said:

    Radiant, pure minds beneath our defilements.

    Our living core is empty
    Our natural state has no qualities
    Harmony and disharmony have no truth
    Nothing beneath, nothing above, all pure mind ...

    Are you speaking from direct experience? I am.

  • JaySonJaySon Everywhere in the Cosmos Veteran

    @lobster said:

    This is a moral universe,

    Que? Is this assumed?

    How could it not be when virtue brings true joy?

  • DavidDavid some guy The Hammer in Ontario, Canada, eh Veteran
    edited January 14

    Karmic rebirth may or may not be linear but reaping what we sow is. Can't reap the corn before it's planted.

    The universe has become more moral since we've come around and there could be others that have morals as well.

    If the universe was without morality, I would guess that we would be too.

    JaySonTigger
  • JaySonJaySon Everywhere in the Cosmos Veteran

    It's my fault for not speaking clearly enough about what I mean by it is a moral universe.

    I'm not saying the universe prefers virtue.

    Maybe it is too hard to explain, though emptiness, compassion, karma, virtue, the Buddha nature... It all fits together in one moral universe.

    Morality is everything.

  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Moderator

    Ah. Well that's different.
    Subtle, but different, nevertheless.... ;)

  • silversilver In the beginning there was nothing, and then it exploded. USA, Left coast. Veteran

    Am I allowed to say I don't get it? O.o
    :3

    Steve_B
  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Moderator

    No.

    silverlobsterVastmind
  • techietechie India Veteran

    @David said:
    Karmic rebirth may or may not be linear but reaping what we sow is. Can't reap the corn before it's planted.

    The universe has become more moral since we've come around and there could be others that have morals as well.

    If the universe was without morality, I would guess that we would be too.

    Someone once told me there is no such thing as morals, only a marriage of convenience.

    Maybe, maybe not.

  • ZenCanuckZenCanuck Toronto, ON Explorer

    Today I started TNH's The Art of Power, which so far, about 20-odd pages into it, is blowing me away. It's like the third book of his I've begun (read the one on Anger and also the one on bringing peace to Israelis & Palestinians). And he spoke about George W. Bush, who was still President when he wrote this, and how he was probably the most powerful man in the world yet TNH believed he felt powerless and weak. I was very much inclined to agree with this assessment because I felt that GWB's Reign of Error was very much a product of his own personal demons and the fact that they might still be a 'dry drunk'. I don't believe Bush was a happy man, don't know if he is now but he got an awful lot of people killed so I don't know.

    And yes, I know we ain't seen nuthin' yet. But it starts on Friday. :(

Sign In or Register to comment.