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Is Buddhism easier for a mind that is less conditioned?

TiggerTigger Toronto, Canada Veteran

We come into the conditioned from the unconditioned when born.

If an infant was taught Buddhism from birth or childhood before their minds get conditioned, would it be easier for them to understand the Dharma and reach Nirvana, since their minds would be more open? Nowadays children are conditioned to enjoy pretty much the same sense pleasures that adult’s desire (i.e. parents giving an IPad to their child before bed or to keep them silent). What if a child was taught the Dharma from birth with little distractions?

The less one has learnt about this world that is created from illusion, the easier it would be to understand such teachings. I think it’s difficult for ME to understand some of the more complex concepts because of my conditioning which has built walls around my open mind and heart. It’s like my mind trying to swim upstream against the currents of my conditioning.

I will keep swimming though!

JaySonupekka

Comments

  • JaySonJaySon Everywhere in the Cosmos Veteran

    I wish Thich Nhat Hanh was my dad.

    But, of course, he's celibate.

    TiggerVastminddhammachickperson
  • When you take refuge in the Triple Gem in a direct way you become a true son of the Buddha. Could you ask for more?

    upekkalobster
  • SpinyNormanSpinyNorman It's still all old bollocks Veteran

    @Tigger said:
    We come into the conditioned from the unconditioned when born.

    If an infant was taught Buddhism from birth or childhood before their minds get conditioned, would it be easier for them to understand the Dharma and reach Nirvana, since their minds would be more open? Nowadays children are conditioned to enjoy pretty much the same sense pleasures that adult’s desire (i.e. parents giving an IPad to their child before bed or to keep them silent). What if a child was taught the Dharma from birth with little distractions?

    It's an interesting thought since Buddhist practice can be seen as a way of stepping outside our conditioning and habitual assumptions - including the Buddhist ones!

    lobsterShoshin
  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator

    Ask a Tulku.....

    dhammachick
  • TiggerTigger Toronto, Canada Veteran

    @SpinyNorman said:
    It's an interesting thought since Buddhist practice can be seen as a way of stepping outside our conditioning and habitual assumptions - including the Buddhist ones!

    That's what I was thinking. Obviously if a child were brought up in a Buddhist family they would understand it more than mysef because I started at 37. Children, however have a more open mind without the restrictions of our conditioning so I was curious if the teachings would be easy for them to understand.

  • karastikarasti Breathing Minnesota Veteran

    I think there is a different understanding that they are brought up with that takes a while to learn, especially comparing Eastern families to Western ones. The way they understand Buddhism is just different because of how they view the mind in their cultures.

    That said, Thailand is a very Buddhist country but also has some awful problems. Myanmar/Burma as well. Being born Buddhist doesn't guarantee anything. But if your family actually practices Buddhism, the seeds are planted very early and in that case there is a level of understanding already present. But there are a lot of people who are Buddhist by birth but it's no different than so many of us being born into Catholic families (or whatever). It can only be a part of your life if you choose it to be so.

    BunksTiggerlobsterperson
  • BunksBunks Australia Veteran

    @JaySon said:
    I wish Thich Nhat Hanh was my dad.

    But, of course, he's celibate.

    I am not so sure. If you're anything like me you'd probably be more likely to listen to someone who wasn't your dad than your actual father!

    JaySondhammachickTiggerperson
  • I have often felt that religion and philosophy have a larger audience with those that have had the chance to live life a little bit.

    Having the life experiences necessary to see the connections where they may apply. Sort of like how you could read about sculpting, you could watch someone sculpt, but until you put your own hands on the clay ...

    Tiggerperson
  • JaySonJaySon Everywhere in the Cosmos Veteran

    @Bunks said:

    @JaySon said:
    I wish Thich Nhat Hanh was my dad.

    But, of course, he's celibate.

    I am not so sure. If you're anything like me you'd probably be more likely to listen to someone who wasn't your dad than your actual father!

    So true.

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