Examples: Monday, today, last week, Mar 26, 3/26/04
Welcome home! Please contact lincoln@newbuddhist.com if you have any difficulty logging in or using the site. New registrations must be manually approved which may take up to 48 hours. Can't log in? Try clearing your browser's cookies.

Analytical meditation

TiggerTigger Toronto, Canada Veteran
edited February 15 in Meditation

I was reading this article on CNN. Dr Sanjay Gupta meditated with His Holiness the Dalai Lama. In this article they discussed analytical meditation. Although I have heard by reading my Buddhist books and listening to the Sangha here that there are a variety of different ways to meditate (lying down, walking etc.) this is a new one to me.

I was interested in trying it as opposed to object meditation or breath meditation. Has anyone tried it? What do you think of during meditation? how did it work for you?

http://www.cnn.com/2017/02/15/health/sanjay-gupta-dalai-lama-meditation/index.html

Comments

  • BunksBunks Australia Veteran

    Analytical meditation is common in the Tibetan tradition.

    I principally undertake analytical meditation on the topics of the Lam Rim (Gradual Path to Enlightenment).

    It works for me!

    http://thubtenchodron.org/buddhism/02-lam-rim/

    Tigger
  • I was interested in trying it as opposed to object meditation or breath meditation. Has anyone tried it? What do you think of during meditation? how did it work for you?

    Trying is a good plan, it might suit. Object, breath, mantra or other 'right concentration' forms of training are very useful in the contemplative methods which include:

    • Koan mulling, used in Zen
    • Mantra meaning based focus used in Pureland, Nichiren, Shingon, Tendai etc
    • Element based meditation
    • Body based contemplation used in Theravadin
    • Contemplation of principles or ideals such as Tantra Yidam practices

    So we might say concentration aids contemplation.

    Idea or analytical meditation, problem solving or goal orientated methods are well suited to the Western mind set that finds 'pure awareness', attention, just sitting etc. as somehow pointless ... which is kinda the point ...

    I am familiar with analytic meditation within Sufi and other traditions but have not come across it formally or been taught it in Dharma. So many thanks for sharing B) I do practice meditation techniques outside of strictly Buddhist dharma even in Buddhist settings. Just as I practice Buddhist meditation if in a Church ...

    Tigger
  • SpinyNormanSpinyNorman It's still all old bollocks Veteran

    @Tigger said:
    I was reading this article on CNN. Dr Sanjay Gupta meditated with His Holiness the Dalai Lama. In this article they discussed analytical meditation. Although I have heard by reading my Buddhist books and listening to the Sangha here that there are a variety of different ways to meditate (lying down, walking etc.) this is a new one to me.

    I was interested in trying it as opposed to object meditation or breath meditation. Has anyone tried it? What do you think of during meditation? how did it work for you?

    http://www.cnn.com/2017/02/15/health/sanjay-gupta-dalai-lama-meditation/index.html

    I think it can be useful, the challenge is going beyond an intellectual understanding, observing principles in everyday experience.

    TiggerShoshin
  • personperson Where is my mind? 'Merica! Veteran

    My understanding is that it's similar to things like metta meditation. In metta we say phrases or think of things that cause a feeling of love to arise in us, then we can drop the intellectual stuff and concentrate as best we can on the feeling of love until it fades, then go back to the intellect to cause the feeling to arise, etc., etc.

    That applies to other concepts as well. The idea that life is precious and that it could end at any time is different than the feeling that life is precious. For example the knowledge that death is certain is different for the average teenager than it is for an 80 year old with cancer. So we contemplate on whatever topic we think would be beneficial for us until a deep feeling associated with the topic arises, then we drop the analysis and concentrate on the feeling until it fades and repeat.

    TiggereggsaviorBunks
  • genkakugenkaku Northampton, Mass. U.S.A. Veteran

    If you want to think, think.

    If you want to meditate, meditate.

    TiggerShoshinnamarupa
  • KeromeKerome Did I fall in the forest? Europe Veteran
    edited February 16

    Just don't try to do both at the same time...

    Honestly I find insight meditation more useful - then whatever comes, comes in a flash. Not much thinking involved, at least not rationally, until afterwards.

    Tigger
  • TiggerTigger Toronto, Canada Veteran
    edited February 16

    I found something appealing about it after reading the article and thinking about it last night. When contemplating putting something like a problem I have in a bubble and meditating on it, I immediately notice the dark, blank space around it. It's like a limitless nothing that kind of intrigues me. The best way I can explain what I mean is to imagine the earth from far away (take out the stars and other planets). Planet earth revolving is like the problem I put in the bubble and the entire universe is the limitless space in my mind. I'm actually more focused on the space around the bubble than the bubble itself or the problem I put in it.

    Does this make sense at all or am I out in space....lol

  • TiggerTigger Toronto, Canada Veteran

    @Kerome said:
    Just don't try to do both at the same time...
    Honestly I find insight meditation more useful - then whatever comes, comes in a flash. Not much thinking involved, at least not rationally, until afterwards.

    Can you elaborate a little @Kerome on both points. I still have not meditated as often as I feel I should or want to but I'm starting to understand it a little better...more than just the fact that you sit there with your eyes closed and meditate to a mantra or breath.

  • eggsavioreggsavior Illinois, USA Explorer

    @lobster's mention of element based meditation reminds me of a great book I read. It is called Living as a River and is based on the 6 elemental practice with modern science and psychology thrown in. It was a great read and helped me a lot when I first seriously contemplated Buddhist practice. Here is some info http://www.bodhipaksa.com/presskit-K11466-LivingAsaRiver-Bodhipaksa.pdf

    Tigger
  • ShoshinShoshin No one in particular Nowhere Special Veteran

    Reading this thread I'm reminded of this ....

    "Awareness is fundamentally non-conceptual-before thinking splits experience onto subject and object. It is empty and so can contain everything, including thought. It is boundless.And amazingly, it is intrinsically knowing!"

    Tigger
  • Lee82Lee82 Veteran

    Is it not mindfulness rather than meditation if you're doing other things at the same time e.g. walking?

    I've tried meditating while lying down but that usually results in falling asleep!

    Tigger
  • BunksBunks Australia Veteran

    @Lee82 said:
    Is it not mindfulness rather than meditation if you're doing other things at the same time e.g. walking?

    I've tried meditating while lying down but that usually results in falling asleep!

    The Tibetan word for meditation is 'Gom'. The translation to English is "to habituate or familiarise...."

    We focus on a positive or virtuous object (the Buddha, a Lam Rim topic) and off we go.....

    TiggerShoshin
  • Analytical meditation is what we are supposed to be doing.

    Keen investigation of the dhamma (dhammavicaya) is the 2nd factor of enlightenment.

    The seven factors are:

    Mindfulness (sati)
    Keen investigation of the dhamma (dhammavicaya)[3]
    Energy (viriya)
    Rapture or happiness (piti)
    Calm (passaddhi)
    Concentration (samadhi)
    Equanimity (upekkha)

    That's all there when Sanjay was doing the practice except that he wasn't actually investigating the Buddhadhamma but just everyday problems.

    Tiggerlobster
  • @Lee82 said:
    Is it not mindfulness rather than meditation if you're doing other things at the same time e.g. walking?

    Eventually they intertwine ... walking meditation in my experience initially is best practiced very slowly, deliberately and formally. Not just 'going for a mindful walk', which tends to be far more difficult in a distractive way ...

    I've tried meditating while lying down but that usually results in falling asleep!

    Sloth, falling asleep in a meditation posture is also possible. Been through that a lot. If you are falling asleep, then either sit up, do a led yoga nidra practice, walking meditation ... note the Buddhas supported reclining posture in statues ... I have never fallen asleep during walking meditation - top tip ;) B)

    Tigger
  • SpinyNormanSpinyNorman It's still all old bollocks Veteran

    @pegembara said:
    Analytical meditation is what we are supposed to be doing.

    Keen investigation of the dhamma (dhammavicaya) is the 2nd factor of enlightenment.

    The seven factors are:

    Mindfulness (sati)
    Keen investigation of the dhamma (dhammavicaya)[3]
    Energy (viriya)
    Rapture or happiness (piti)
    Calm (passaddhi)
    Concentration (samadhi)
    Equanimity (upekkha)

    Yes, but investigation here applies to the conditionality of our immediate experience, rather than contemplation on abstract themes.

    Tigger
  • SpinyNormanSpinyNorman It's still all old bollocks Veteran

    @Lee82 said:
    Is it not mindfulness rather than meditation if you're doing other things at the same time e.g. walking?

    I've tried meditating while lying down but that usually results in falling asleep!

    It's a question of language, but I usually think of "meditation" as a seated practice.

  • SpinyNormanSpinyNorman It's still all old bollocks Veteran
    edited February 17

    @eggsavior said:
    @lobster's mention of element based meditation reminds me of a great book I read. It is called Living as a River and is based on the 6 elemental practice with modern science and psychology thrown in. It was a great read and helped me a lot when I first seriously contemplated Buddhist practice. Here is some info http://www.bodhipaksa.com/presskit-K11466-LivingAsaRiver-Bodhipaksa.pdf

    Yes, the 6-element practice is interesting. It's based on the six properties of a person in MN140. You can look at the 6 elements as a form-heavy alternative to the 5 aggregates.

    "'A person has six properties.' Thus was it said. In reference to what was it said? These are the six properties: the earth property, the liquid property, the fire property, the wind property, the space property, the consciousness property. 'A person has six properties.' Thus was it said, and in reference to this was it said."
    http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/mn/mn.140.than.html

    eggsavior
  • 'Spaciousness ... the Final Frontier. To Boldly Go
    where no-One has gone before ...'

    Star Trek ... almost

    Learning how to calm, explore, manage our Middle Way is a lifetimes quest. Who knows what is out in there ...

  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Moderator

    @lobster said:...Learning how to calm, explore, manage our Middle Way is a lifetimes quest. Who knows what is out in there ...

    What is 'out there' is of no consequence. It's what is 'in here' that needs attention.
    Moment by moment.

    lobsterTigger
  • lobsterlobster Veteran
    edited 4:35AM

    @pegembara said:
    Analytical meditation is what we are supposed to be doing.

    :)
    Yes.

    Keen investigation of the dhamma (dhammavicaya) is the 2nd factor of enlightenment.

    The seven factors are:

    Mindfulness (sati)
    Keen investigation of the dhamma (dhammavicaya)
    Energy (viriya)
    Rapture or happiness (piti)
    Calm (passaddhi)
    Concentration (samadhi)
    Equanimity (upekkha)

    That's all there when Sanjay was doing the practice except that he wasn't actually investigating the Buddhadhamma but just everyday problems.

    As a contemplative trainee Boddhisattva [allegedly], I am a great believer in every day solutions. The Buddha offers perfect solutions. Hooray! :+1:

    Then there is us ... :3
    Sometimes skilfull teachings are limited ...

    Tigger
Sign In or Register to comment.