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Changing job?

NamadaNamada Veteran
edited April 22 in Buddhism Basics

I have now got an offer to change my job, for a completly new one, whats your advice
there are two options:

1) Stay where Iam, I have been working there for 8 years, working as a prosess operator in fishfeed industry,
very psycialy work, maintaince and controling of machines, cleaning and sweeping the factory, taking laberatory test of the fish feed, we are controlling everything in the factory, and also sitting in a controll room with 7 screens, alarms biping and phones calling. And working shifts, switching between day, evening and night, its very bussy, but with great collegues and its a safe job.

2) I do have a own company selling parquet and wooden floors at the same time working as prosess operator, but its difficult to get the company running due to lack of time and energy so its more like a hobby.
Now another parquet company, which is much bigger and are doing very good, want me to work with them. Its a salesman job, and I will also work with floor projects (just like I did with my company). Its a day time work, sitting on phone and maybe some traveling, and never get dirty.

Sallery is the same.

Should I choose 1 or 2? ;)

Comments

  • karastikarasti Breathing Minnesota Veteran

    I suppose it depends what is most important to you. But shift work tends to be hard on the body and can lead to health issues because of the lack of following circadian rhythms. I actually prefer a more physical job, especially if it allows a chance to get outside. But I wouldn't be a good sales person at all so I probably wouldn't choose #2, LOL. good luck in whatever you decide! It's nice to have options :)

  • NamadaNamada Veteran
    edited April 22

    @karasti shift work its terrible yes, I have almost crashed with my car several times. And there are many diseases you can get, diabets 2 and lung cancer and many other bad things.

    I will choose nr 2 . Sales its not so bad as it sounds, its more about asking people/companies questions and finding out what they want. I will not push any one to buy things they dont like :) My only concern is the pressure to sell so and so much whitin a week/month, that can be stressfull.

    dhammachick
  • karastikarasti Breathing Minnesota Veteran

    Indeed. My dad worked shift work for 30 years, driving an hour each way to work. thankfully they could car pool so some could nap in the car. but I don't know how people do it. I worked night shift at a good job for about 3 months before I quit.

  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator
    edited April 23

    There's a saying in English that goes, "if it's not broken, don't fix it. " if the salary is the same, that means that they want you to drive sales and push clients into buying. Your attitude of not pushing clients into buying what they don't want is honourable, but that's not what your employers will want to hear. They're employing you due to your evident experience in the field. They will want to exploit that to their advantage.
    Not in a nasty way; of course you will earn money. But they want you to earn commission too, and at the same time, make them more successful.

    The problems you list in your post ("I have almost crashed with my car several times. And there are many diseases you can get, diabets 2 and lung cancer and many other bad things.") are remediable through a change of lifestyle and managing your time better and more effectively, and looking to your diet and habits. These things don't HAVE to happen.

    Changing jobs for the same salary, won't advance your career or make things better for you.
    You will be under a different kind of pressure to perform, and 'bring home the goods'. If you can't improve your company's status by driving sales higher, they will eventually get rid of you.

    I have been in the very same situation as yourself.
    My strong advice is to stay where you are, and change what you do, to ensure you stay healthy.

    Namadaspencerstone
  • NamadaNamada Veteran
    edited April 23

    Very wise said @federica I have changed my sleep pattern, and Iam using a bike instead of car to work (most of the days).

    They have just lost two important people, especially the one who was the founder and driver to get half of the sales. And now he's gone. Therefore, they want to reach me, who have long experience with my own online store and sales in the parquet industry, they also want my customers. So, I'm really going to lose money on this in the long run. Instead of selling for them, I can sell for my own company.

    It can be risky if I change, I can loose the job, because if we dont sell enough, they need to get rid of the last person who got in there, and that will be me.

    Did you stay or did you change job @federica?

  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator

    I stayed. "Better the Devil you know", as they say.

    Hozan
  • NamadaNamada Veteran

    There are some people telling me that you should change job after 5 years, it is healthy to try something new, but Iam not so sure, if you feel happy where you are why not stay?

  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator

    Why should you change job after 5 years? Ask them to explain, and ask them if they have done so. If they have, I suspect you will get a mixed bag on how well that worked for them. or didn't....

    Your last question is relevant, and one you should answer for yourself....

  • NamadaNamada Veteran
    edited April 23

    Iv been working there for 8 years, but I have decided to stay, its more like a common saying changing job is good for you.

    federicaHozandhammachick
  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator

    I would disagree. Continuity, company loyalty and stability is better in the long run for you and your family. To continually change jobs, gives no long-term guarantees, and looks suspect on any CV.
    Besides, there is no guarantee that a change will necessarily be profitable or beneficial... or that you will automatically be happier doing the new job, or more happy than you were in the old job...

    Hozan
  • KeromeKerome Love, love is mystery The Continent Veteran
    edited April 23

    From my experience of 10 years of hiring people for teams: a cv with lots of jobs less than 2 years long looks like a man with problems (I would avoid hiring such a person), a cv without a few job changes looks like someone capable but with little ambition or no liking for a challenge, a cv with 3+ changes spaced roughly 1.5-2 years apart looks like someone who is very capable, ambitious and won't be staying long term.

    So there is no need to move just "because it's good for you", at most it will cause some extra questions at an interview.

  • karastikarasti Breathing Minnesota Veteran

    It's funny when people realize something about themselves and think it should apply to everyone. My mom is like this, it's just funny usually but sometimes awfully frustrating. There are people who like to switch jobs every 5 years. I personally can't say I've worked one job (other than stay at home mom) for more than 5 years. But it isn't an arbitrary rule I have, just how things have worked out between life and moving etc. I'm not against working somewhere for longer or anything. Everyone just has to make the right choice for them in their situation. We prefer the stability. My husband will probably be in his job (with the same employer, not same position) for 35 years by the time he retires. He's quite ok with that. Especially because living in a town of 3200 people there aren't many opportunities for a job that doesn't involve running a cash register.

    While some of the effects of shift work can be mediated by better choices, not all of them can. There have been several studies about the health effects of long-term shift work, especially when it involves over-night work and the demands it places on the body irregardless of your diet etc overall. There are people who thrive on a night shift, of course. It's the constant changing that never allows the body to achieve homeostasis that becomes a problem for many. My dad's 3 shifts were 5am to 3pm, 4pm to midnight, and 10pm to 6am. He worked 6 days on, one day off, with one long weekend (3 days off) a month. For 30 years. Plus an hour drive each way. I can't even imagine. But he also retired at 49.

  • dhammachickdhammachick crazy Aussie BUJU Sydney, Australia Veteran

    @Kerome said:
    From my experience of 10 years of hiring people for teams: a cv with lots of jobs less than 2 years long looks like a man with problems (I would avoid hiring such a person), a cv without a few job changes looks like someone capable but with little ambition or no liking for a challenge, a cv with 3+ changes spaced roughly 1.5-2 years apart looks like someone who is very capable, ambitious and won't be staying long term.

    And as someone who has contracted for ten years I'm finding it extremely difficult because of this kind of attitude. I'm not having a go at you either @Kerome - just using your viewpoint as an example.

    And to be fair, it's a totally understandable POV. It's just really hard when contracting and temp or casual work is on the rise. So my advice to the OP is to stay put unless you know for certain that this new role will be one you will stay in for years. I'm finding it extremely difficult at this point to find work and it's getting dire for me to be perfectly honest.

  • KeromeKerome Love, love is mystery The Continent Veteran

    No offence taken. If you need any help finetuning your cv dhammachick I'm happy to offer a hand...

    dhammachick
  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator

    I found it necessary to create a variety of CVs depending on the work I was looking for. I ended up having at least 4 on the go, all slightly different and tweaked according to the particular job search. I didn't lie. I just left out any information not relevant to the post I was applying for.
    One thing I would not compromise on, was my level of education. In spite of being advised to "dumb it down" so as to not appear too intelligent or overqualified, I refused.
    I'm not suggesting that I am better than anyone else. But such advice may give you an idea of the calibre of jobs available!

  • dhammachickdhammachick crazy Aussie BUJU Sydney, Australia Veteran

    Yeah I have two at the moment - one aimed at IT, even though I really don't want to go back into it. And one aimed at admin.

    @Kerome - PM me your email address and I'll take you up on your very generous and much appreciated offer.

    _ /\ _

  • NamadaNamada Veteran
    edited April 23

    @dhammachick so you worked with IT?

    How is it to have an office job, do you not get restless?
    sit on a chair in front of a computere and a phone all day long?

    Iam just asking because I have never had such a job.

  • dhammachickdhammachick crazy Aussie BUJU Sydney, Australia Veteran

    @Namada said:
    @dhammachick so you worked with IT?

    How is it to have an office job, do you not get restless?
    sit on a chair in front of a computere and a phone all day long?

    Iam just asking because I have never had such a job.

    When I was in IT, most of my day was spent under desks cabling machines or in the server room or build room reimaging machines so I never had a job where I was in front of a PC 8 hours a day either :lol:

  • HozanHozan Veteran
    edited April 24

    I found linkedin very useful in Ireland anyway for keeping a profile and making connections. You have a linkedin profile @dhammachick ?

  • dhammachickdhammachick crazy Aussie BUJU Sydney, Australia Veteran

    @Hozan said:
    I found linkedin very useful in Ireland anyway for keeping a profile and making connections. You have a linkedin profile @dhammachick ?

    Sure do :grin:

    Hozan
  • One thing that I don't think anybody has mentioned yet is if you enter a line of work that in any way competes with your employer, which it sounds it might, you will most likely have to sign a non-compete agreement which will squash any self employment Endeavor's you might be trying to accomplish.

    Food for thought.

  • NamadaNamada Veteran
    edited May 1

    I was in a meeting with the parquet compnay last week and I said yes to their job offer. I will work as a project manager. I will also develop their online store.

    The main reason is that this is a daytime job and I have a chance to learn new stuff. In my old job I know how things work and its difficult to make progress or change to another job within the same company, you are stuck in the same position until you die.

    Rotating shift is also terrible for our body, so I prefer a normal day time job.

    karastiShoshin
  • karastikarasti Breathing Minnesota Veteran

    Congrats on the new job!

  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator

    I wish you well and much success in your new venture.
    Whatever the outcome may be, you made the right decision.
    It's the right decision, because you made it.
    Good luck, and be fortunate!

  • NamadaNamada Veteran
    edited May 1

    Thank you @karasti and @federica :) Not the easiest decisions to do, but sometimes we have to leave the safe ground to be able to grow and learn new things.

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