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UK elections.

Its on a knife edge ! Hung parliament? Coalition? We will have to wait and see.

Comments

  • HozanHozan Veteran

    One of the big questions... will Mr Fishfinger be voted in.....

    Bunks
  • BunksBunks Australia Veteran
    edited June 9

    @Hozan said:
    Its on a knife edge ! Hung parliament? Coalition? We will have to wait and see.

    Great! You'll be in the same boat Australia has been for a decade.

    No laws get passed and the major parties compromise their principles to please the likes of Mr Fish Finger.....

    Good times!!

    VastmindHozan
  • KeromeKerome Did I fall in the forest? Europe Veteran

    It sounds like a hung parliament from the early results they have been giving this morning. They deserve it, the fine art of deal-making sounds like it will get yet another run out.

  • JeffreyJeffrey Veteran

    Is that a 'hung' parliament or are they just happy to see me?

    Sorry I just had to joke around a bit.

    BunksHozanShoshinkarasti
  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator
    edited June 9

    I personally thought it highly stupid of Theresa May to call an election while in the throes of Brexit. Now she's got to gamble on either being the leader of a Minority Government, or form a coalition. Can't see her climbing into the parliamentary four-Poster with Corbyn. There is some murmur of a coalition with the Democratic Unionist Party (NI), but I think she's hanging on by the skin of her teeth.

    See, this is why I think Politics stinks, and all Politicians are two-faced, hypocritical, power-grabbing self-centred maniacs. First they're at loggerheads, then they're shaking hands and forming 'new deals for the good of Britain'.

    "Strong and Stable". Pah!!

    Hozan
  • KeromeKerome Did I fall in the forest? Europe Veteran

    I have no sympathy for the Conservatives, whether they be Dutch or English. They seem to be in favour of big business as a way of life, which I feel is the disease of the modern era. So much money is concentrated there, balancing power in favour of the rich and away from the common man.

    I'm in favour of changing that, of legislating in favour of people power and divesting big business of as much of its influence as possible. For example by giving workers the same voting rights as shareholders, up to 50% of the total. None of the current Dutch parties go that far, so I vote with the Greens, who are about 10% of the total parliamentay seats here.

    Hozan
  • HozanHozan Veteran

    @federica said:
    I personally thought it highly stupid of Theresa May to call an election while in the throes of Brexit. Now she's got to gamble on either being the leader of a Minority Government, or form a coalition. Can't see her climbing into the parliamentary four-Poster with Corbyn. There is some murmur of a coalition with the Democratic Unionist Party (NI), but I think she's hanging on by the skin of her teeth.

    See, this is why I think Politics stinks, and all Politicians are two-faced, hypocritical, power-grabbing self-centred maniacs. First they're at loggerheads, then they're shaking hands and forming 'new deals for the good of Britain'.

    "Strong and Stable". Pah!!

    I have to agree with everything above.
    Brexit is now very difficult. UK are in a weaker bargaining position now in terms of Brexit.
    I know I am in Ireland but as our closest neighbours , political events in UK have a big bearing on us here.
    I fear Brexit will have a negative effect on generations to come in the UK. I sincerely hope I am wrong and things work out

  • HozanHozan Veteran
    edited June 9

    Theresa May has no intentions of standing down as leader. Carry on regardless.

  • KeromeKerome Did I fall in the forest? Europe Veteran

    I'm not so sure about Brexit, I think it's purely psychological whether the conservatives have 316 seats or 333 seats as far as a mandate for brexit is concerned. There are practical differences in terms of getting legislation through, but that's a different matter.

    I read an interesting article a while ago about the Greeks negotiating bail-outs in the EU, and that the size of the democratic mandate was largely irrelevant, because when the Greeks talked to the Germans the Germans would say, "we have our own democratic mandate". So in the end it ended up being one nation state talking to another, not one party representing X people talking to another party.

    It should be interesting because many trade deals recently have been negotiated on the EU level, and there is quite a lot of experience in Brussels on this. The extra rules are not good for the Netherlands as we have a lot of trade with the UK, I understand.

    Hozan
  • HozanHozan Veteran

    Same for Ireland. UK leaving the EU is a disaster for us too. UK is our biggest import/export partner. It makes a mess of borders in NI too where now the 6 counties will be non- EU and the rest of the Republic will be EU.

  • HozanHozan Veteran
    edited June 9


    Power at any cost. What might that mean?
    The cost of Theresa May getting "into bed " with DUP could be high. Northern Ireland has has a very violent past. At the moment Sinn Fein and DUP are trying to renegotiate a devolved government at Stormont which has been why the North has been so peaceful in recent history. These negotiations could now very easily be greatly damaged as DUP are part of the UK government. Todays coalition will only have the effect of destabilising the Northern Ireland situation.
    But obviously power is more important to those who have it and want to maintain it.

    Speaking as an Irish person who wants continued peace in NI.

    Kerome
  • HozanHozan Veteran

    BunksdhammachickSpinyNorman
  • lobsterlobster Veteran
    edited June 10

    Was there another ineffective election? Could have voted for a fishfinger? Might have been the sensible choice. o:)

    The young people are taking an interest in politics changing their social environment - I blame facebook/twitter/social media. ;)

    Will they bypass the traditional self defeating dinosaurs, power politics of the past and ... well who knows ... :)

    Viva la Revaluation :p
    https://www.thealternative.org.uk/about/

    Hozan
  • dhammachickdhammachick crazy Aussie BUJU Sydney, Australia Veteran
    edited June 10

    It appears to me that the UK is in the same position as Australia in some ways. No decent political parties that you'd want to govern, and no policies that appear moral or humane.

    My condolences if I'm correct.

    HozanKerome
  • ToshTosh Veteran

    @Kerome said:
    It sounds like a hung parliament from the early results

    Yes, I agree, hang the ruddy lot of them.

    I'd like to see a bit less politicking and a bit more governing.

    Hozan
  • ToshTosh Veteran

    @Hozan said:
    Speaking as an Irish person who wants continued peace in NI.

    I spent quite a few years in NI as a soldier during The Troubles.

    First tour was 1989 at North Howard Street Mill, just off the Falls Road. It was a typical 'hiding behind walls in people's back gardens' kind of tour. Getting spat at, bricks chucked at us, p-checks, house searches, sitting for hours on cordons, the odd shooting or coffee jar bomb; it was a very archetypal NI tour. I loved it; I was only 19 years old.

    Then I did two years with Force Intelligence Unit (NI) and worked in one of those 'funny sections' that did covert bomb disposal. It was a really facinating job and I met a lot of 'interesting people'. Some of the stuff Martin Dillon wrote about in his book "The Dirty War" was straight out of this unit.

    My last two years there was in RAF Aldergrove. A boring office job, unfortunately.

    I met and married a Carrickfergus lass too. She was very pretty, but was driven crazy (by me) fairly easily.

    Hozan
  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator
    edited June 11

    @dhammachick said:
    It appears to me that the UK is in the same position as Australia in some ways. No decent political parties that you'd want to govern, and no policies that appear moral or humane.

    My condolences if I'm correct.

    Condolences gratefully accepted. Back atcha...

    The young were 'politically motivated' to vote because they fell for Corbyn's "No more Uni Fees" Election promise, which, like so many promises made by his party, is dependent on funds they have absolutely no idea how to raise, generate or accumulate.

    With Diane Abbott's farcical comments here there and everywhere, it sounds like they have £100 in the kitty, and they need drinks (£100) Food (£100) the venue (£100) the DJ (£100) and the Mini Bus (£100) And they expect the same £100 to cover the lot....

  • ShoshinShoshin No one in particular Nowhere Special Veteran

    WalkerHozandhammachickFosdick
  • lobsterlobster Veteran

    :)

    Stay informed rather than deformed ...
    http://www.simplepolitics.co.uk/about

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