Examples: Monday, today, last week, Mar 26, 3/26/04
Welcome home! Please contact lincoln@newbuddhist.com if you have any difficulty logging in or using the site. New registrations must be manually approved which may take up to 48 hours. Can't log in? Try clearing your browser's cookies.

Buddhist quotes

13»

Comments

  • JeffreyJeffrey Veteran

    Among Tibetans there is a saying that a person who thinks he is better or above others because he is wiser, more capable, more knowledgeable or learned is like someone sitting on the highest peak of the highest mountain. And what is it like on the peak of that mountain? It is very cold there. It’s very hard. It’s very lonely and nothing grows there. On the other hand, the person who cultivates humility and puts himself in a lower position is said to enjoy living on the fertile land of the planes.

    ~ Khandro Rinpoche

    lobsterBunksKeromeperson
  • personperson Don't believe everything you think 'Merica! Veteran

    Joseph Goldstein reads this passage from the book Bangkok Tattoo by John Burdett. It's on the harsh side, but rings fairly true.

    You see, dear reader (speaking frankly, without any intention to offend), you are a ramshackle collection of coincidences held together by a desperate and irrational clinging, there is no center at all, everything depends on everything else, your body depends on the environment, your thoughts depend on whatever junk floats in from the media, your emotions are largely from the reptilian end of your DNA, your intellect is a chemical computer that can’t add up a zillionth as fast as a pocket calculator, and even your best side is a superficial piece of social programming that will fall apart just as soon as your spouse leaves with the kids and the money in the joint account, or the economy starts to fail and you get the sack, or you get conscripted into some idiot’s war, or they give you the news about your brain tumor. To name this amorphous morass of self-pity, vanity, and despair self is not only the height of hubris, it is also proof (if any were needed) that we are above all a delusional species. (We are in a trance from birth to death.) Prick the balloon, and what do you get? Emptiness. It’s not only us-this radical doctrine applies to the whole of the sentient world. In a bumper sticker: The fear of letting go prevents you from letting go of the fear of letting go. Here’s the good Phra in fine fettle today: “Take a snail, for example. Consider what brooding overweening self-centered passion got it into that state. Can you see the rage of a snail? The frustration of a cockroach? The ego of an ant? If you can, then you are close to enlightenment.”

    Like I say, not everyone’s cup of miso. Come to think of it, I do believe I prefer Pisit, but the Phra does have a point: take two steps in the divine art of Buddhist meditation, and you will find yourself on a planet you no longer recognize. Those needs and fears you thought were the very bones of your being turn out to be no more than bugs in your software.

    JeffreylobsterShoshin
  • VimalajātiVimalajāti Whitby, Ontario Veteran

    You see, dear reader (speaking frankly, without any intention to offend), you are a ramshackle collection of coincidences held together by a desperate and irrational clinging

    The rest of the quote is good too, but I feel like this is one of the most wonderful, concise, unpretentious (and that is very important), and fun summaries of Buddhadharma I've yet to encounter.

    person
  • lobsterlobster Veteran

    We are deluded?
    Who would have guessed. Most of us hopefully. It is harsh @person ...
    BUT somehow through our delusion we can recognise the reality of our state.

    Now what?

    Real compassion extends to each and every sentient being, not just to friends or family or those in terrible situations. To develop the practice of compassion to its fullest extent, one must practice patience. Shantideva tells us that if the practice of patience really moves your mind and brings about a change, you will begin to see your enemies as the best of friends, even as spiritual guides. Enemies provide us some of the best opportunities to practice patience, tolerance, and compassion.
    How to Practice: The Way to a Meaningful Life

    personJeffreyShoshinBunks
  • We can choose to take refuge in the brilliant sanity of enlightenment, the Buddha; trust the process of the path, the Dharma; and rely on the experience of those who guide us along the path, the Sangha.

    —Lama Tsony

    lobsterBunks
  • "All the various types of teachings and spiritual paths are related to the different capacities of understanding that different individuals have. There does not exist, from an absolute point of view, any teaching which is more perfect or effective than another.
    A teaching's value lies solely in the inner awakening which an individual can arrive at through it. If a person benefits from a given teaching, for that person that teaching is the supreme path, because it is suited to his or her nature and capacities. There's no sense in trying to judge it as more or less elevated in relation to other paths to realization."
    .
    ~Chögyal Namkhai Norbu Rinpoche.
    .
    Emaho!

    federicalobsterShoshinBunks
  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator

    @Jeffrey said:

    "All the various types of teachings and spiritual paths are related to the different capacities of understanding that different individuals have. There does not exist, from an absolute point of view, any teaching which is more perfect or effective than another.
    A teaching's value lies solely in the inner awakening which an individual can arrive at through it. If a person benefits from a given teaching, for that person that teaching is the supreme path, because it is suited to his or her nature and capacities. There's no sense in trying to judge it as more or less elevated in relation to other paths to realization."
    .
    ~Chögyal Namkhai Norbu Rinpoche.
    .
    Emaho!

    I think that says it all....

  • When you are with others, watch your speech.
    When you are alone, watch your mind.

    Pabongka Rinpoche
    http://newbuddhist.com/discussion/22512/favorite-buddhist-quote

    ShoshinJeffreyBunksperson
  • RojehoRojeho CT Explorer

    I needed some of this today, then grew very tired with the thread. It is a Monday, where I am not feeling aligned, there is some anger, some impatience, some disappointment, and unfulfilled, exasperating desire. I am watching it all, so that it does not spill over, and I end up being less than patient or disrespectful to folks. I have not felt this way, or rather it has not been so intense in quite some time. In practice this morning it was there but subdued as I sat. I am trying to not let it be anything, but my ego loom, has collected a lot of yarn, and is trying very hard to make a sweater. This thread and Pablo Casals cello are managing to redirect me for a bit. Thanks @Bunks

    federicalobsterBunksKerome
  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator

    @Rojeho, I liken this kind of feeling to having just changed my baby's nappy (diaper) whereupon they immediately proceed then t have the biggest, smelliest most disgusting dump I could imagine... What the heck did they eat?? Oh and the cat's brought in a half-eaten bird and vomited the rest in the middle of my sitting room carpet - cream deep-pile, obviously.... and the dog's left a mountain of hair on the back seat of my just-valeted car...

    It's a shit-storm and the only one who can clear it up is me.

    Just one thing at a time. Just one.
    Just one step at a time.
    Just one.
    You don't need to clear up your mind-mess in one fell swoop.
    Go at it a morsel at a time.
    Work out what you immediately need to make yourself feel better, whatever that might be.
    Then go at it slow but sure...
    Be calm.
    Know that one way or another, we've all had times like this, and there's a way in, an abiding, and a way out.

    So be good to yourself. Don't beat yourself up about this.
    This too shall pass.

    RojehoKeromeHozan
  • RojehoRojeho CT Explorer

    I needed that too. Thank you @federica

  • personperson Don't believe everything you think 'Merica! Veteran

    There is no right or wrong, but right is right and wrong is wrong ~Seung Sahn

    The article is pretty good too.

  • By paying attention calmly, in all situations, we begin to see clearly the truth of life experience. We realise that pain and joy are both inevitable and that they are also both temporary.
    ~ Sylvia Boorstein, Don’t Just Do Something, Sit There

    ShoshinHozanRojeho
  • Sages, too, endure the same mundane circumstances as we—they fall sick, suffer injuries, meet with unwelcome changes—but their wisdom sees past the incidental to the universal, to the certainty of change that is best coped with by equanimity. Wisdom does not alter the world; it lets the sage transcend the world.

    —Bhikkhu Nyanasobhano

    lobsterBunksperson
  • personperson Don't believe everything you think 'Merica! Veteran

    The perfect way is only difficult for those who pick and choose,
    do not like,
    do not dislike,
    all will then be clear,
    make a hair's breadth difference and heaven and earth are set apart
    if you want the truth to stand clear before you
    never be for or against
    the struggle between for and against is the mind's worst disease.

    Seung Sahn

    lobsterJeffrey
  • @person said:
    The perfect way is only difficult for those who pick and choose,
    do not like,
    do not dislike,
    all will then be clear,
    make a hair's breadth difference and heaven and earth are set apart
    if you want the truth to stand clear before you
    never be for or against
    the struggle between for and against is the mind's worst disease.

    Seung Sahn

    I like it but strange to apply to trivial things like watching your sports team and hoping that they win!

  • personperson Don't believe everything you think 'Merica! Veteran
    edited October 14

    @Jeffrey said:

    @person said:
    The perfect way is only difficult for those who pick and choose,
    do not like,
    do not dislike,
    all will then be clear,
    make a hair's breadth difference and heaven and earth are set apart
    if you want the truth to stand clear before you
    never be for or against
    the struggle between for and against is the mind's worst disease.

    Seung Sahn

    I like it but strange to apply to trivial things like watching your sports team and hoping that they win!

    Funny. I suppose it means I have to give up on my lifelong support for my team to be enlightened. On a more mundane level I sometimes talk about my team with rabid fans and I'll bring up things they could do better or are failing at and the rabid fan gets all upset because they want so bad to believe that our team is perfect.

  • BunksBunks Australia Veteran

    @person said:

    @Jeffrey said:

    @person said:
    The perfect way is only difficult for those who pick and choose,
    do not like,
    do not dislike,
    all will then be clear,
    make a hair's breadth difference and heaven and earth are set apart
    if you want the truth to stand clear before you
    never be for or against
    the struggle between for and against is the mind's worst disease.

    Seung Sahn

    I like it but strange to apply to trivial things like watching your sports team and hoping that they win!

    Funny. I suppose it means I have to give up on my lifelong support for my team to be enlightened. On a more mundane level I sometimes talk about my team with rabid fans and I'll bring up things they could do better or are failing at and the rabid fan gets all upset because they want so bad to believe that our team is perfect.

    It's not about giving up...it's about seeing the futility in it all...

    personlobster
  • personperson Don't believe everything you think 'Merica! Veteran

    Not a Buddhist quote but Marcus Aurelius is considered a stoic philosopher, and stoicism has much in common with Buddhism. I randomly came across this quote and loved it.

    “The best revenge is not to be like your enemy.” -Marcus Aurelius

    lobsterfedericaBuddhadragon
  • personperson Don't believe everything you think 'Merica! Veteran
    edited October 28

    Another non-Buddhist Buddhist, the stoic Epictetus

    “Wealth consists not in having great possessions, but in having few wants.”

    “Don't explain your philosophy. Embody it.”

    “Man is not worried by real problems so much as by his imagined anxieties about real problems”

    “It's not what happens to you, but how you react to it that matters.”

    “The key is to keep company only with people who uplift you, whose presence calls forth your best.”

    “Any person capable of angering you becomes your master;
    he can anger you only when you permit yourself to be disturbed by him.”

    “People are not disturbed by things, but by the views they take of them.”

    “You are a little soul carrying around a corpse”

    “He is a wise man who does not grieve for the things which he has not, but rejoices for those which he has. ”

    “Caretake this moment. Immerse yourself in its particulars. Respond to this person, this challenge, this deed. Quit evasions. Stop giving yourself needless trouble. It is time to really live; to fully inhabit the situation you happen to be in now.”

    483 total quotes https://www.goodreads.com/author/quotes/13852.Epictetus

    JeffreylobsterKeromeBuddhadragon
  • CarameltailCarameltail UK Veteran

    “To think in terms of either pessimism or optimism oversimplifies the truth. The problem is to see reality as it is." Thich Nhat Hanh

    ShoshinBuddhadragonHozan
  • BuddhadragonBuddhadragon Ehipassiko & Carpe Diem Samsara Veteran

    "You cannot ask the darkness to leave:
    you must turn on the light"

    ~Sogyal Rinpoche

    HozanShoshin
  • VimalajātiVimalajāti Whitby, Ontario Veteran
    edited December 13

    The Venerable Muttātherī has given us a short and sweet list of five things she is thankful of the bhikkhunīsaṅgha (assembly of nuns) for:

    I'm free, well-freed.
    Freed from three crooked things that bent me down:
    My mortar, my pestle, my husband.
    Uprooting craving leading to being,
    I'm free from age and death.

    -Therīgāthā 1.11, Hymns of the Elder Nuns

    lobster
13»
Sign In or Register to comment.