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Uposatha Day Observance

BunksBunks Australia Veteran

Today I am undertaking the full moon Uposatha Day observance at home. I have completed this before while staying at a Monastery but not at home.

For those unfamiliar with this practice, I am observing the eight precepts below:

  1. I undertake the training rule to avoid all killing
  2. I undertake the training rule to avoid all stealing
  3. I undertake the training rule to avoid all sexual activity
  4. I undertake the training rule to avoid all dishonesty
  5. I undertake the training rule to avoid all alcohol and drugs
  6. I undertake the training rule to avoid eating after midday
  7. I undertake the training rule to avoid beautification (non-perfumed deodorant for me) and entertainment (limiting myself to dhamma books, videos and dhamma posts on newbuddhist.com)
  8. I undertake the training rule to avoid lying on high or luxurious beds (I'll sleep on a thin mattress on the lounge room floor)

Is this something that anyone else on here undertakes?

I do feel my mind is a lot calmer - particularly having avoided things like Facebook and TV.

UkjunglistShoshinDhammaDragonlobsterHozannakazcidTravellerkarasti
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Comments

  • Here in Thailand as you probably know, their holidays are based around the lunar cycle and Buddhism. But the average Thai would probably get drunk on such holidays lol.

    Sounds like a good process to take now and again though (what you are intending to do) much like ordaining for a day and really getting in touch with the mind and life. I may do this once every 2 weeks or something in the future, thanks for posting.

    BunksDhammaDragonHozan
  • BunksBunks Australia Veteran

    Pleasure @Ukjunglist - I'll keep posting updates on this thread about it as it keeps me motivated too. Hopefully might inspire a few people here and there :)

    UkjunglistHozan
  • DhammaDragonDhammaDragon Carpe Diem switzerland Veteran

    As a rule, the eight precepts as a whole are aimed at monks and celibates and only five apply to the layman, @Bunks .

    Echoeing what @Ukjunglist said above, from what I was able to see with my Buddhist Asian acquaintances, they throw lavish parties on these celebrations and also get drunk and enjoy.

    Being on the threshold to the weekend, I can imagine I will definitely trespass several of the above, lol... ;)

    But then, I am not the average "rules-and-observances" kind of gal.
    I may not be perfect, but I know my intentions are good.
    I know I am a good person with good feelings towards all sentient beings.
    Not following all precepts to the letter will not make me a bad Buddhist, even if it earns me another round of Samsaric stint...

    BunksTravellerlobsterHozan
  • BunksBunks Australia Veteran

    @DhammaDragon said:
    As a rule, the eight precepts as a whole are aimed at monks and celibates and only five apply to the layman, @Bunks .

    That is true but lay followers are encouraged to observe the eight precepts on at least the full and new moons (each fortnight) at the Monastery I attend.

    DhammaDragonlobsterHozan
  • Bravo @Bunks

    We trainee Sith need good people to turn, otherwise the force would be compromised ;) :p O.o B) :3 o:)

    So far my training is going well. I quite like wearing black and smiling villainously. Next will be working on a cackle B)

    Bunks
  • DhammaDragonDhammaDragon Carpe Diem switzerland Veteran

    I often question observances and rules that we take for granted and don't accept them at face value, unless I see the positive impact it could make to my practice.
    Tonight, we are going out with my family and not drinking is not an option.
    No sex either.
    I will go out made up and perfumed.
    And no way I will not sleep on my bed as usual.
    So tonight, for me, it does not work.
    And I will not feel more imperfect than I already am.
    But I see it okay if someone else has other views on this and feels like observing all eight precepts on given dates.
    I fast twice a week and see the positive results in my health.
    I can imagine people who observe certain rituals and ceremonies notice positive spiritual results...

    lobsterBunksHozan
  • HozanHozan Veteran

    I usually try to increase my awareness and practice around a full moon too. Thanks for sharing Bunks. Much appreciated. Much Metta to you.

    BunksDhammaDragonTraveller
  • karastikarasti Breathing Minnesota Veteran

    @Bunks I do it on occasion. Probably not as often as I should, as I do notice great benefit for me in the areas of a calmer and more contemplatively focused mind. The bed thing is kind of an odd one to me. I understand where it comes from, but it lead to a long train of thought of how ALL of our cozy furniture was designed with superiority in mind. Going without furniture is actually much healthier for us, furniture was always a status item that separated the affluent from the peasants. Shoes as well. We don't see it that way today, but I've found that throughout society, we definitely still carry that with us. I spend far less time on elevated furniture than most people. I do my writing and my work on the floor. I watch tv on the floor. I do not sleep on the floor because having tried I wake up with an awful sore neck (even sleeping with a camping mat). Interestingly, when I camp, I do not have this problem! So when I can, I take that precept and sleep outside. Winter has come early to Minnesota, so that won't be happening for quite a long time now!

    Anyhow, sorry to ramble on. I think it's a good thing to do when you notice benefit. I have read a few teachers say "don't take precepts when you know you won't keep them" and those are teachers that recommend taking them every day. I understand the importance of not wantonly breaking precepts, but then what is the point to challenge ourselves and grow in our practice if we only take them when we know it will be easy to keep them? What if we took them on a day we know we have a family holiday and "force" ourselves to experience during down wine at the dinner table? What opportunities present when we do that versus when we are holed up at home, alone?

    BunkslobsterCarlita
  • DhammaDragonDhammaDragon Carpe Diem switzerland Veteran

    @karasti said:

    I understand the importance of not wantonly breaking precepts, but then what is the point to challenge ourselves and grow in our practice if we only take them when we know it will be easy to keep them? What if we took them on a day we know we have a family holiday and "force" ourselves to experience during down wine at the dinner table? What opportunities present when we do that versus when we are holed up at home, alone?

    My question would still be "Why"?
    If one strives to lead an overall skillful life and make skillful choices every second of our life.
    Grow as a person through our practice, in full acceptance of our laypeople condition.

    Why would one make this observance, especially at a family dinner table, or at a gathering with friends?
    How exactly would this benefit our practice or what would we be trying to prove to ourselves that could not be derived from a consistent practice and genuine care for other sentient beings?
    Just wondering.

  • BunksBunks Australia Veteran

    Thanks @karasti. > @DhammaDragon said:

    @karasti said:

    I understand the importance of not wantonly breaking precepts, but then what is the point to challenge ourselves and grow in our practice if we only take them when we know it will be easy to keep them? What if we took them on a day we know we have a family holiday and "force" ourselves to experience during down wine at the dinner table? What opportunities present when we do that versus when we are holed up at home, alone?

    My question would still be "Why"?
    If one strives to lead an overall skillful life and make skillful choices every second of our life.
    Grow as a person through our practice, in full acceptance of our laypeople condition.

    Why would one make this observance, especially at a family dinner table, or at a gathering with friends?
    How exactly would this benefit our practice or what would we be trying to prove to ourselves that could not be derived from a consistent practice and genuine care for other sentient beings?
    Just wondering.

    Each to their own I guess.

    From my experience keeping the eight precepts creates a calmer and more peaceful mind. That would be of benefit to those around me I reckon.

    lobsterDhammaDragon
  • Exactly so @Bunks

    Work out your salvation with diligence.
    -- Buddha, last words

  • karastikarasti Breathing Minnesota Veteran

    @DhammaDragon For myself, in order to keep "progressing" or growing, I have to challenge myself. If I simply always go about my life as normal without questioning why I do something and to see what exists on the other side of that, then to me, that is incomplete. I might very well decide to have wine with dinner. I often do. But I am less content with my choice if I don't know what exists on the other side, when feasible. For me to decide that having wine at dinner is the right choice, I have to know what it is like to not have wine in that situation as well.

  • ShoshinShoshin No one in particular Nowhere Special Veteran
    edited November 4

    I guess for busy on the go people it would be beneficial to observe certain days as 'special days' ( "Time out days" ) where they can fulfil something they feel is special/beneficial...

    I'm in the fortunate position where I can observe everyday as a special day, that is, time is put aside for things that are beneficial to me and those whom I interact with and I deliberately make things special throughout the day, even at work, rest & play :) ...Plus I live alone so in a sense it's like being on a long term retreat... Eat when hungry, drink when thirsty, sleep when tired

    There are no hard fast rules in Buddhism (besides rules are meant to be broken )

    If precepts are broken, this does not mean laypeople should beat themselves up with the broken parts...Just make a vow to do better the next time...and there are plenty of next times to better oneself :)

    @Bunks said:
    I do feel my mind is a lot calmer

    By practising the Dharma, one finds life is Karma (and calmer) :)

    DhammaDragon
  • KeromeKerome Did I fall in the forest? Europe Veteran

    My mind either hides from me in meditation, or it sneaks up on me, carrying me away on a thought before I’ve noticed what it’s doing. It’s very devious. In the periods in between I look at the emptiness and concentrate on the breath.

    It’s interesting how different people experience meditation in slightly different ways.

    Bunks
  • BunksBunks Australia Veteran

    I reckon if it weren't for the third precept above (no sexual activity) I could take the eight precepts pretty much every day!

    I find it difficult to keep that precept for more than a day or two. I reckon I'd need to be in a monastery in order to do it (as I have done in the past).

    DhammaDragonHozan
  • DhammaDragonDhammaDragon Carpe Diem switzerland Veteran

    @Bunks said:
    I reckon if it weren't for the third precept above (no sexual activity) I could take the eight precepts pretty much every day!

    I find it difficult to keep that precept for more than a day or two. I reckon I'd need to be in a monastery in order to do it (as I have done in the past).

    Me too.
    I am in general a nice Buddhist gal (maybe too old for gal, mind the joke), but abiding by the third precept is a no-no with me.

    Though actually, the idea is not to indulge in a form of sex intercourse that feels illicit, or violates the "consenting adults" rule, so just having intercourse does not contravene the third precept somehow.

    Hozan
  • dhammachickdhammachick crazy Aussie BUJU Sydney, Australia Veteran
    edited November 13

    I'm engaged, in a monogamous relationship. I don't break the third precept as I'm not a monk.

    BunksHozanlobster
  • BunksBunks Australia Veteran

    Ah, sorry @dhammachick.

    I think you’re confusing the third precept taken as part of the five I.e. no sexual misconduct.

    I am talking about no sexual activity at all.

  • dhammachickdhammachick crazy Aussie BUJU Sydney, Australia Veteran

    @Bunks said:
    Ah, sorry @dhammachick.

    I think you’re confusing the third precept taken as part of the five I.e. no sexual misconduct.

    I am talking about no sexual activity at all.

    I'm answering/agreeing with @DhammaDragon

    BunksDhammaDragon
  • CarlitaCarlita Riding the waves! United States Veteran

    @Bunks said:
    Today I am undertaking the full moon Uposatha Day observance at home. I have completed this before while staying at a Monastery but not at home.

    For those unfamiliar with this practice, I am observing the eight precepts below:

    1. I undertake the training rule to avoid all killing
    2. I undertake the training rule to avoid all stealing
    3. I undertake the training rule to avoid all sexual activity
    4. I undertake the training rule to avoid all dishonesty
    5. I undertake the training rule to avoid all alcohol and drugs
    6. I undertake the training rule to avoid eating after midday
    7. I undertake the training rule to avoid beautification (non-perfumed deodorant for me) and entertainment (limiting myself to dhamma books, videos and dhamma posts on newbuddhist.com)
    8. I undertake the training rule to avoid lying on high or luxurious beds (I'll sleep on a thin mattress on the lounge room floor)

    Is this something that anyone else on here undertakes?

    I do feel my mind is a lot calmer - particularly having avoided things like Facebook and TV.

    Yes. The hardest one to keep for me is not eating after midday. I know the monastery rules somewhat were I live (three hours from me) say we can drink water and tea. I haven't tried it since I don't eat a lot of food to begin with and usually hungry in the evening. Beautification is easy just a habit. Beds... well, mine isn't luxurious nor high so I don't know how I would accommodate that unless I sleep on the floor every full and new moon. (I'm a floor person anyhow)

    The five precepts are easy. Few reasons it's easy, the law, medical health, and just not interested in looking for anyone to do-it with. What I did instead was broke down the precepts since I keep them naturally. We can steal with our words-if someone is having a good day, we may steal it with our negativity. Sexual impurity could be stealing the looks of an attractive person when he or she didn't give you "the permission" to look longer than natural reactions. Killing, in the liturgy book we were given at refuge, says it could even be enjoying someone else being hurt or put to death. Agreeing to taking a life for whatever means. I put my action and drama videos away. It took awhile to get used to the non-clinging. So far, it has worked. With enjoying people getting hurt, I think that comes because many see humans as "sinners" so we still belittle the weak and encourage the strong. As for high beds, one can interpret that as a step towards humility. If the Church didn't give me a bed (and food and clothing), I'd still have my little cot.

    I guess it depends on what one is attached to. Meditation helps.

    lobster
  • BunksBunks Australia Veteran

    @Carlita. I agree with a fair chunk of what you say but I don't find the five precepts easy.

    I still catch myself exaggerating stories (dishonesty) and don't get me started on sexual misconduct!

    Also, is using the photocopier at work to print a personal item stealing? Some would say yes.

    A lot of it is interpretation and different people and different traditions have different interpretations.

  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator
    edited November 15

    The added inferences on the 5 precepts are a relatively modern slant or habit, and something we ourselves have added, as a way of interpreting them to actually suit our modern attitudes, lifestyles and ways of earning a living.
    I personally think they're quite simple, and appropriate to themselves as read. I would rather not complicate them and make them more burdensome than they already are - and goodness knows, keeping them mindfully, all day, every day, is quite a challenge enough already, without embellishment.
    The Buddha was quite clear in his instructions and intentions. Don't harm, don't steal, don't misbehave sexually, don't talk idly and maliciously, and avoid the intake of substances likely to cause your brain to become fuddled.

    All other additional caveats can probably be found in the greater number or precepts laid down for the Ordained.
    And we're not ordained.

    So while I can see the point of expanding on the Precepts, I do personally think it's Gilding the Lily.

    BunksHozanDhammaDragon
  • CarlitaCarlita Riding the waves! United States Veteran
    edited November 15

    @Bunks said:
    @Carlita. I agree with a fair chunk of what you say but I don't find the five precepts easy.

    I still catch myself exaggerating stories (dishonesty) and don't get me started on sexual misconduct!

    Also, is using the photocopier at work to print a personal item stealing? Some would say yes.

    A lot of it is interpretation and different people and different traditions have different interpretations.

    Yeah. I printed personal item for school at work yesterday. Then I realized during office hours full time staff can print it for me. They also said in a way yes just dont print too much. wink wink.

    That and then rethinking habits. When you realize the habit its some what easier to start turning from it (acknowledge suffer and its cause)

    My issue is attachment. Not part of the precepts but The Buddha has so many types of number of guidences that what you do well in one set tips you up in another set.

  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator

    @Carlita said: ...My issue is attachment. Not part of the precepts but The Buddha has so many types of number of guidences that what you do well in one set tips you up in another set.

    I'm afraid I don't agree.
    The Buddha's message is simple, and I cannot think of any instance where adhering to his Pprinciples would ever trip anyone up.
    The key is not to complicate.
    The key is to simplify.

    He had a number of guiding principles (just to help you, because I don't think English is your first tongue...? There's no such word as 'guidences') but the ones we might perceive as being 'more complicated', were for the ordained members of his sangha; yet to those wishing to ordain as monks (and nuns!) these Principles made sense.
    But we don't need to over-think this.
    And it's not what the Buddha intended.
    His simple message was this:

    Pubbe cāham bhikkhave etarahi ca dukkhañ c'eva paññāpemi dukkhassa ca nirodham ('Both now and formerly, monks, it is just suffering that I make known and the ceasing of suffering') (M. 22: i,140)

    The fact that he laid out his 'mission' so simply, is evident to me that overthinking everything merely muddies the waters.

    Just my 2 cents. :)

  • HozanHozan Veteran

    Tame the mind. Simplify as much as possible. Overthinking everything including the precepts is counterproductive.

    BunksDhammaDragon
  • CarlitaCarlita Riding the waves! United States Veteran
    edited November 15

    @federica said:

    @Carlita said: ...My issue is attachment. Not part of the precepts but The Buddha has so many types of number of guidences that what you do well in one set tips you up in another set.

    I'm afraid I don't agree.
    The Buddha's message is simple, and I cannot think of any instance where adhering to his Pprinciples would ever trip anyone up.
    The key is not to complicate.
    The key is to simplify.

    He had a number of guiding principles (just to help you, because I don't think English is your first tongue...? There's no such word as 'guidences') but the ones we might perceive as being 'more complicated', were for the ordained members of his sangha; yet to those wishing to ordain as monks (and nuns!) these Principles made sense.
    But we don't need to over-think this.
    And it's not what the Buddha intended.
    His simple message was this:

    Pubbe cāham bhikkhave etarahi ca dukkhañ c'eva paññāpemi dukkhassa ca nirodham ('Both now and formerly, monks, it is just suffering that I make known and the ceasing of suffering') (M. 22: i,140)

    The fact that he laid out his 'mission' so simply, is evident to me that overthinking everything merely muddies the waters.

    Just my 2 cents. :)

    Eh. It is simple. This is what I meant:

    1. Four ways to arahantship
    2. Four kinds of person
    3. Six recollections
    4. Four establishments of mindfulness (good read and meditation practice)
    5. Four noble truths
    6. Eight fold path
    7. Six sense basis

    Its interesting that its put into sets, The Dhamma. There are more. Makes it hard where to start after you get pass the basics.

  • CarlitaCarlita Riding the waves! United States Veteran
    edited November 15

    I like to study since Ive been to college a quarter of my adult life. I havent got through the full book I have of The Buddha's discourses. Its a goal though.

    Bunks
  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator

    @Carlita said:

    @federica said:

    @Carlita said: ...My issue is attachment. Not part of the precepts but The Buddha has so many types of number of guidences that what you do well in one set tips you up in another set.

    I'm afraid I don't agree.
    The Buddha's message is simple, and I cannot think of any instance where adhering to his Pprinciples would ever trip anyone up.
    The key is not to complicate.
    The key is to simplify.

    He had a number of guiding principles (just to help you, because I don't think English is your first tongue...? There's no such word as 'guidences') but the ones we might perceive as being 'more complicated', were for the ordained members of his sangha; yet to those wishing to ordain as monks (and nuns!) these Principles made sense.
    But we don't need to over-think this.
    And it's not what the Buddha intended.
    His simple message was this:

    Pubbe cāham bhikkhave etarahi ca dukkhañ c'eva paññāpemi dukkhassa ca nirodham ('Both now and formerly, monks, it is just suffering that I make known and the ceasing of suffering') (M. 22: i,140)

    The fact that he laid out his 'mission' so simply, is evident to me that overthinking everything merely muddies the waters.

    Just my 2 cents. :)

    Eh. It is simple. This is what I meant:

    1. Four ways to arahantship
    2. Four kinds of person
    3. Six recollections
    4. Four establishments of mindfulness (good read and meditation practice)
    5. Four noble truths
    6. Eight fold path
    7. Six sense basis

    Its interesting that its put into sets, The Dhamma. There are more. Makes it hard where to start after you get pass the basics.

    That's if you ever get past them. Me? I'm happy with the basics.
    As a householder, it's all I want.
    Or need.

  • HozanHozan Veteran

    Carlita I think you may like making lists as much as I like pandas! 💚💚

    CarlitaBunks
  • CarlitaCarlita Riding the waves! United States Veteran
    edited November 15

    @federica said:

    @Carlita said:

    @federica said:

    @Carlita said: ...My issue is attachment. Not part of the precepts but The Buddha has so many types of number of guidences that what you do well in one set tips you up in another set.

    I'm afraid I don't agree.
    The Buddha's message is simple, and I cannot think of any instance where adhering to his Pprinciples would ever trip anyone up.
    The key is not to complicate.
    The key is to simplify.

    He had a number of guiding principles (just to help you, because I don't think English is your first tongue...? There's no such word as 'guidences') but the ones we might perceive as being 'more complicated', were for the ordained members of his sangha; yet to those wishing to ordain as monks (and nuns!) these Principles made sense.
    But we don't need to over-think this.
    And it's not what the Buddha intended.
    His simple message was this:

    Pubbe cāham bhikkhave etarahi ca dukkhañ c'eva paññāpemi dukkhassa ca nirodham ('Both now and formerly, monks, it is just suffering that I make known and the ceasing of suffering') (M. 22: i,140)

    The fact that he laid out his 'mission' so simply, is evident to me that overthinking everything merely muddies the waters.

    Just my 2 cents. :)

    Eh. It is simple. This is what I meant:

    1. Four ways to arahantship
    2. Four kinds of person
    3. Six recollections
    4. Four establishments of mindfulness (good read and meditation practice)
    5. Four noble truths
    6. Eight fold path
    7. Six sense basis

    Its interesting that its put into sets, The Dhamma. There are more. Makes it hard where to start after you get pass the basics.

    The Four Establishments of Mindfulness.(Satipatthana Sutta) The Unattractiveness of the Body, one of the four, can help with the precept of attachment to beauty.

    They are meditation guides. I dont learn from breathing. I have to use my noddle as well.

    Bunkslobster
  • CarlitaCarlita Riding the waves! United States Veteran

    @Hozan said:
    Carlita I think you may like making lists as much as I like pandas! 💚💚

    There is more where that came from! (Daily, um, weekly sutta idea.....hmm.)

  • HozanHozan Veteran

    Unattractiveness of the body sounds suspiciously like aversion.

    dhammachick
  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator

    These disciplines are for Monastics.
    For Lay people it is sufficient to observe the first 8 precepts.

    Uposatha days are times of renewed dedication to Dhamma practice, observed by lay followers and monastics throughout the world of Theravada Buddhism.

    For monastics, these are often days of more intensive reflection and meditation. In many monasteries physical labor (construction projects, repairs, etc.) is curtailed. On New Moon and Full Moon days the fortnightly confession and recitation of the Bhikkhu Patimokkha (monastic rules of conduct) takes place.

    Lay people observe the Eight Precepts on Uposatha days, as a support for meditation practice and as a way to re-energize commitment to the Dhamma.

    From here. (But hey, whatever floats your raft.... ;) )

    DhammaDragon
  • HozanHozan Veteran

    @Carlita said:

    @Hozan said:
    Carlita I think you may like making lists as much as I like pandas! 💚💚

    There is more where that came from! (Daily, um, weekly sutta idea.....hmm.)

    Holy f**k!! Lol 😂💚💚
    Much love and metta @Carlita

    Carlita
  • CarlitaCarlita Riding the waves! United States Veteran

    Much metta to you and @federica too. B)

    HozanBunks
  • dhammachickdhammachick crazy Aussie BUJU Sydney, Australia Veteran

    @Carlita said:
    They are meditation guides. I dont learn from breathing. I have to use my noddle as well.

    We ALL have to "use our noddle". And for most part, we do.

  • DhammaDragonDhammaDragon Carpe Diem switzerland Veteran

    @Carlita said:
    The hardest one to keep for me is not eating after midday. I know the monastery rules somewhat were I live (three hours from me) say we can drink water and tea. I haven't tried it since I don't eat a lot of food to begin with and usually hungry in the evening.

    Remember how the Buddha came to the insight of middle path by emaciating himself to death and finding that he was none the wiser by it, @Carlita?

    What you are doing is not only unhealthy but totally useless for your practice.
    You may choose to eat one meal a day and not eat in the evenings.
    But your body needs to stay hydrated.
    Even more so, since you are depriving it of solid food.

    It is not by tormenting our body that you'll attain cessation of dukkha, enlightenment, peace, whatever rocks your boat.
    It is through mental training.
    And for this, your body is a useful vehicle that must be kept healthy and fit.

    "Reflecting properly, he takes alms-food.
    He does so not for enjoyment, not for vanity, not for improvement of the body,
    not for a better complexion, but only to sustain the physical body,
    to have just enough nourishment for maintaining life,
    to appease hunger and to carry out the Noble Practice of Purity.
    [He reflects thus:] ‘By this alms-food, I shall remove the existing discomfort
    and shall prevent the arising of new discomfort.
    I shall have just enough nourishment to maintain life and
    to lead a blameless life with good health.’"
    (Sabbasava Sutta)

    http://www.healthfitnessrevolution.com/10-healthy-buddhist-teachings-for-everyone/

    As Tsongkhapa put it:

    “The human body, at peace with itself, is more precious than the rarest gem.
    Cherish your body, it is yours this one time only.
    The human form is won with difficulty, it is easy to lose.”

    HozanCarlita
  • DhammaDragonDhammaDragon Carpe Diem switzerland Veteran
    edited November 16

    I have no lists but dozens of books I rely on to establish a wholesome Buddhist practice.

    When I hear of laypeople trying to overstep the monastic boundary, I seriously wonder how much of Buddhadharma there is to it, and how much of personal issues and hangs-up that they try to pass off as Buddhadharma...

    If we are to engage in a serious Buddhist practice, we must first of all be honest with ourselves and own our own BS.

    Otherwise, we are just fooling ourselves and merely exerting ourselves in spiritual by-passing.

    Hozanlobster
  • The five precepts are easy. Few reasons it's easy, the law, medical health, and just not interested in looking for anyone to do-it with. What I did instead was broke down the precepts since I keep them naturally. We can steal with our words-if someone is having a good day, we may steal it with our negativity. Sexual impurity could be stealing the looks of an attractive person when he or she didn't give you "the permission" to look longer than natural reactions. Killing, in the liturgy book we were given at refuge, says it could even be enjoying someone else being hurt or put to death. Agreeing to taking a life for whatever means. I put my action and drama videos away. It took awhile to get used to the non-clinging. So far, it has worked. With enjoying people getting hurt, I think that comes because many see humans as "sinners" so we still belittle the weak and encourage the strong. As for high beds, one can interpret that as a step towards humility. If the Church didn't give me a bed (and food and clothing), I'd still have my little cot.

    I guess it depends on what one is attached to. Meditation helps.

    My understanding too. Well said @Carlita B)

    You introduce the subtelties and continuity of the path, making one always a beginner ...
    Don't get too holy too quick ... we must have balance in lay life as others mention. You are making considerable progress from what I perceive ... <3

    BunksCarlita
  • CarlitaCarlita Riding the waves! United States Veteran

    @DhammaDragon said:

    @Carlita said:
    The hardest one to keep for me is not eating after midday. I know the monastery rules somewhat were I live (three hours from me) say we can drink water and tea. I haven't tried it since I don't eat a lot of food to begin with and usually hungry in the evening.

    Remember how the Buddha came to the insight of middle path by emaciating himself to death and finding that he was none the wiser by it, @Carlita?

    What you are doing is not only unhealthy but totally useless for your practice.
    You may choose to eat one meal a day and not eat in the evenings.
    But your body needs to stay hydrated.
    Even more so, since you are depriving it of solid food.

    It is not by tormenting our body that you'll attain cessation of dukkha, enlightenment, peace, whatever rocks your boat.
    It is through mental training.
    And for this, your body is a useful vehicle that must be kept healthy and fit.

    "Reflecting properly, he takes alms-food.
    He does so not for enjoyment, not for vanity, not for improvement of the body,
    not for a better complexion, but only to sustain the physical body,
    to have just enough nourishment for maintaining life,
    to appease hunger and to carry out the Noble Practice of Purity.
    [He reflects thus:] ‘By this alms-food, I shall remove the existing discomfort
    and shall prevent the arising of new discomfort.
    I shall have just enough nourishment to maintain life and
    to lead a blameless life with good health.’"
    (Sabbasava Sutta)

    http://www.healthfitnessrevolution.com/10-healthy-buddhist-teachings-for-everyone/

    As Tsongkhapa put it:

    “The human body, at peace with itself, is more precious than the rarest gem.
    Cherish your body, it is yours this one time only.
    The human form is won with difficulty, it is easy to lose.”

    True. The reason I don't do the midday precept is because of medical issues. I have finally started eating morning breakfasts with meditations etc before leaving out. I can see why a person would keep it given we just take as much to sustain life. The Sabbasava Sutta quote is a good quote. Ima write that down to keep that in mind.

    Thank you.

  • CarlitaCarlita Riding the waves! United States Veteran

    @lobster said:

    The five precepts are easy. Few reasons it's easy, the law, medical health, and just not interested in looking for anyone to do-it with. What I did instead was broke down the precepts since I keep them naturally. We can steal with our words-if someone is having a good day, we may steal it with our negativity. Sexual impurity could be stealing the looks of an attractive person when he or she didn't give you "the permission" to look longer than natural reactions. Killing, in the liturgy book we were given at refuge, says it could even be enjoying someone else being hurt or put to death. Agreeing to taking a life for whatever means. I put my action and drama videos away. It took awhile to get used to the non-clinging. So far, it has worked. With enjoying people getting hurt, I think that comes because many see humans as "sinners" so we still belittle the weak and encourage the strong. As for high beds, one can interpret that as a step towards humility. If the Church didn't give me a bed (and food and clothing), I'd still have my little cot.

    I guess it depends on what one is attached to. Meditation helps.

    My understanding too. Well said @Carlita B)

    You introduce the subtelties and continuity of the path, making one always a beginner ...
    Don't get too holy too quick ... we must have balance in lay life as others mention. You are making considerable progress from what I perceive ... <3

    Thank you Lobster. I really appreciate that. Feeling better too walking through the day more reflective state than rushed. I think that works for thirty minutes at most, haha. Not holy just have a lot of time on my hands than the average working America parent.

    Much metta (love that phrase...cant remember off hand who said it)

  • CarlitaCarlita Riding the waves! United States Veteran
    edited November 17

    Its encouraged for lay buddhist to try to take the eight precepts on full and new moon. Its almost new moon tommorrow sat North Hem. EST.

    Im wondering if you guys celebrate the uposatha? How did it go or are you doing it today?

    Ima limit my internet use only to this site.

    Cheerios!

  • BunksBunks Australia Veteran

    @Carlita said:
    Its encouraged for lay buddhist to try to take the eight precepts on full and new moon. Its almost new moon tommorrow sat North Hem. EST.

    Im wondering if you guys celebrate the uposatha? How did it go or are you doing it today?

    Ima limit my internet use only to this site.

    Cheerios!

    I have started to do this @Carlita. I'll be taking the eight precepts here today (Saturday).

    I'm planning on taking my two little ones up to the Monastery for the Dana meal offering this morning.

    They haven't been before.

    There are heaps of kangaroos and other wildlife so lots to see.

    Let us know how you go. I have found it a good way to kick start my practice again (I really need it right now - struggling!)

    Shoshin
  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator

    We already have an Uposatha Day observance thread....Not sure why we need a second one?

  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator

    Merged.

  • CarlitaCarlita Riding the waves! United States Veteran

    @federica said:

    Merged.

    Was wondering. Thanks.

  • CarlitaCarlita Riding the waves! United States Veteran

    @Bunks said:
    Today I am undertaking the full moon Uposatha Day observance at home. I have completed this before while staying at a Monastery but not at home.

    For those unfamiliar with this practice, I am observing the eight precepts below:

    1. I undertake the training rule to avoid all killing
    2. I undertake the training rule to avoid all stealing
    3. I undertake the training rule to avoid all sexual activity
    4. I undertake the training rule to avoid all dishonesty
    5. I undertake the training rule to avoid all alcohol and drugs
    6. I undertake the training rule to avoid eating after midday
    7. I undertake the training rule to avoid beautification (non-perfumed deodorant for me) and entertainment (limiting myself to dhamma books, videos and dhamma posts on newbuddhist.com)
    8. I undertake the training rule to avoid lying on high or luxurious beds (I'll sleep on a thin mattress on the lounge room floor)

    Is this something that anyone else on here undertakes?

    I do feel my mind is a lot calmer - particularly having avoided things like Facebook and TV.

    I dont know if my reply is still here. Its new moon now. I thought it was tommorrow. I have to go to the store. I know there is an eating obsevance but may have to eat cause my health. This is the only site Ill be on today and cut off my music. My bed is already low. Probably sleep on the floor. Humility and empathy for those without a bed.

    Cant remember what else. I did post a link. I can repost it, it talks about the meaning of the day of reverence and discourses.

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