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Reading Lists

For the first time I'm actually committing to paper (digital paper), a reading list of books I would like to read next year.

My reading is usually a good mix of fiction, non-fiction, mindfulness, self development and work.

How many of you make such a list so not to miss out books that you'd really like to read at some point?

Here's my 2018 list so far then, including two new ones thanks to @federica from the other thread.

  1. Snow Leopard
  2. Great Expectations (re-read)
  3. The Exorcist
  4. Long Walk to Freedom (re-read)
  5. Man's Search for Meaning
  6. Harry Potter 2
  7. The Malay Archipelago
  8. East of Eden
  9. Casino Royal
  10. From Russia With Love
  11. Fire Under The Snow
  12. Dracula
  13. The Light Fantastic
  14. Equal Rights
  15. Harry Potter 3

15 books may be a little ambitious but it's a target and not too far off this year and doesn't include any business related material that'll squeeze inbetween the others.

Bunks

Comments

  • KeromeKerome Love, love is mystery The Continent Veteran

    I’ll just sneak in that my favourite Terry Pratchett is The Thief of Time, which has some vaguely Buddhist references in it. Worth a good many laughs!

    Lee82
  • @Lee82 said:

    1. Casino Royal
    2. From Russia With Love

    Have you read any of the Bond books before? They were a bit disappointing for me. I’ve heard John le Carré’s books are very good if you like spy fiction.

    I don’t make lists as such, having had too many of those at university. But I am really enjoying reading at the moment, in fact more so than at uni. I hope you enjoy following your list, but I wouldn’t worry so much if you divert from it, or grind to a halt. Just enjoy what you enjoy. Happy reading!

    lobster
  • @adamcrossley said:
    @Lee82 said:

    1. Casino Royal
    2. From Russia With Love

    Have you read any of the Bond books before? They were a bit disappointing for me. I’ve heard John le Carré’s books are very good if you like spy fiction.

    I don’t make lists as such, having had too many of those at university. But I am really enjoying reading at the moment, in fact more so than at uni. I hope you enjoy following your list, but I wouldn’t worry so much if you divert from it, or grind to a halt. Just enjoy what you enjoy. Happy reading!

    I haven't actually, though I've watched the films. I have those books on my shelf as gifts and haven't gotten around to reading them yet.

    I thought having a list may encourage me to read more and try to get through them, as opposed to wasting time doing (or not doing) other things. Of course the list will be updated dynamically as the year progresses :-)

  • Well then I hope you enjoy them!

    Lee82
  • Lobster reading list:

    1. Read list ✔️

    Job done! Another success story!

    wojciech
  • personperson Don't believe everything you think 'Merica! Veteran

    I only have one on mine right now. Sapiens by Yuval Noah Harari.

  • I am reading a basic Psychology textbook that I got for 1 dollar at Goodwill! Also reading Napoleon's Buttons which is about key chemistry in world history. And 'on deck' is Soonish by Kelly and Zach Weinersmith about ten emerging technologies by the author of my favorite web comic (saturday morning breakfast cereal).

  • karastikarasti Breathing Minnesota Moderator

    I have a list, but lists produce a problem for me in that once I have one, I have to finish it. So even if I hate the book, I will force myself to keep reading it just to check it off the list :lol: I am reading a book like that right now, and I hate it when a book almost feels like a punishment. I keep assuming it'll get better, but 800 pages is a long book to suffer through!

    I just received a book from the UK called "Woman in the Wilderness" which is fantastic. I am reading Stephen King's newest (which is the one I am suffering through...normally I love his stuff but this is a collaboration and it's just...SO SLOW). Love and Terror on the Howling Plains of Nowhere by Poe Ballantine is excellent. I'm also reading Dharma Bums by Keruoac. Gwendy's Button Box (Stephen King) was very good, and had some good contemplation from my own Buddhist point of view on the dilemma of the main character.

    I read every day, but I have to be in the right mood for certain books. I probably read about 25-30 books a year. Some within a day or 2, and others take half the year to get through. I am working through Big Magic by Elizabeth Gilbert as well, working on creative blocks because of preconceived ideas of what creativity is.

  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator

    I recently read "The Hare with the Amber eyes" The blurb says, in part, "You hold in your hands, a masterpiece."

    It wasn't wrong.

    I would recommend anyone who has an interest in European History, detail and wonder-weaving, to grab a copy and read it.

    Especially you, @dhammachick. It's an extraordinary tale woven with pomp, pageantry, and holds and grips you to the very last page.
    And you close the book wishing it would go on forever....

    Kundo
  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator
    edited January 8

    Would love to read this next. Apparently, it's to be made into a movie.

    it doesn't need a fictitious hollywood-style happy ending. It already has one!

  • Lee82Lee82 Veteran

    @federica said:
    Would love to read this next. Apparently, it's to be made into a movie.

    it doesn't need a fictitious hollywood-style happy ending. It already has one!

    An interesting read, and embarrassed to say I hadn't heard of the tattooing before!

  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator

    Slight diversion:
    Many years ago, while living in Chelsea, London, as a child, we used to have a lady living a couple of doors away from us; a Mrs Dekapsewicz (I'm not sure that the spelling is correct; it's an attempt. Her name was pronounced Dey-cap-se-witch). She was a lovely neighbour. Generous, good-humoured, always willing to chat and pass the time of day. She always insisted that whatever the weather was like, it was a beautiful day. Whenever my parents went shopping, they would ask if there was anything she needed, as she found it hard to walk, although she didn't seem that old to me... and she would leave a little posy of flowers, or a small box of chocolates, in thanks.
    One fine day, she was in her front garden, kneeling, weeding and tending her postage-sized plot, with care and attention to the aesthetic attractiveness of spring blooms. I loved to help her, so kneeling by her, I began to pull weeds out gently, making sure I didn't disturb the points of the daffodils and crocuses emerging warmed by the Spring sun.
    I noticed 6 numbers on her inner arm. Naturally, being an innocent and curious child, I asked her what they were.
    "They were my name, when I was in a place where I was not allowed to have a name," she said. "One day, I will explain better to you." She smiled, hugged me, and we carried on working in the garden.
    When I later sat eating dinner with my family, I recounted the discussion with them, and both my parents fell silent.
    My father told me to never mention it to her again, because I had not been polite. My mother accepted I hadn't intended to be, but in my naivety, I had asked her something personal.

    My parents must have spoken to her, apologising for my tactlessness, because as I recall, she came round some time later, for dinner with us, and openly told me to never be afraid of asking questions, and never be afraid of speaking up.
    She recounted her story to my mother, and my mother then explained the significance of the numbers, to me, but told me very little else.
    But every time I read anything about the Holocaust, I always remember Mrs Dekapsewicz, and wish I could find out what became of her.

    Lee82lobstersilverKundo
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