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Mindful Attitude

DhammaDragonDhammaDragon Carpe DiemRecidivist Samsarist Veteran

I came across this interesting excerpt called "Attitude," from the book "Mindfulness in Plain English," by Bhante Henepola Gunaratana.

It sets out to give some useful mindfulness tips to take into account during our meditation practice in particular, but I find they may also come pretty handy when applied to our outlook on life in general:

May we all have a blessed and blissful day
๐Ÿ‰๐ŸŒน๐Ÿ’•

BunkspaulysokarastiShoshinlobsterHozanelcra1goKeromeSnakeskinTravellerDavid

Comments

  • paulysopaulyso usa Veteran

    thank you dhammadragon.i love it--great reminders.

    DhammaDragonHozanSnakeskin
  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator

    I think it's appropriate to comment on the difference between acceptance and complacency. One can still be active, while the other lets go - too much.

    It is good to practise Acceptance. It's less skilful if one resigns one's self to everything with an air of complacency. That leads to Apathy.

    Nice text, a worthy reminder. :)

    DhammaDragonHozanSnakeskin
  • DhammaDragonDhammaDragon Carpe Diem Recidivist Samsarist Veteran

    Me too.
    My philosophy is to proactively do what depends on us to do/attain/change, and learn to accept the situations and things we can do nothing about.
    Accepting that a door that stays closed is not our door, is not the same as throwing in the towel before even putting in some good fight.

    HozanSnakeskin
  • HozanHozan Veteran

    @DhammaDragon thank you for posting! An important reminder. Life becomes busy and complex and to return to these core concepts is vital.
    May we all have a blessed and blissful day indeed. I second that.
    Love you all here. I feel very fortunate indeed to have found my Sangha here.
    Have a great weekend.๐Ÿ’š๐Ÿ’š๐Ÿ’š

    SnakeskinDhammaDragon
  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator

    "A door that stays closed, is not our door." Clever, that.....

    HozanSnakeskinDhammaDragon
  • KeromeKerome Love, love is mystery The Continent Veteran

    Useful reminders when applied to meditation too... it gives a slightly different balance to sitting practice when you approach it like that, rather than just always and immediately returning to the breath.

    Thatโ€™s my current hangup in meditation by the way - having gotten distracted, how should one return to the breath from the experience of a sequence of thoughts? Immediately and abruptly, or more gently?

    SnakeskinDhammaDragon
  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator
    edited November 24

    The way I do it - and I'm not suggesting I'm right, I'm just giving what I do - Is, when I notice that my thoughts have infiltrated, I smile inwardly, then say to myself, 'Focus' or 'watch' or 'Mindful'.... and I breathe. I don't always pay attention to the breath. I sometimes focus on sensations, how I feel, and concentrate my gaze on the inside of my eyelids.
    I often begin to see swirling colours (I know they're a natural phenomenon, phosphenes), but I find them helpful to my Meditation...

    SnakeskinDhammaDragon
  • SnakeskinSnakeskin Texas, USA Veteran
    edited November 24

    @federica said:
    I think it's appropriate to comment on the difference between acceptance and complacency. One can still be active, while the other lets go - too much.

    It is good to practise Acceptance. It's less skilful if one resigns one's self to everything with an air of complacency. That leads to Apathy.

    Nice text, a worthy reminder. :)

    I agree. It's important to distinguish acceptance from complacency. The line between the two is the line between right and wrong effort. To practice acceptance is to practice honesty, to accept, to be honest about things as they are and not to pretend they're otherwise. As Bhanteย said, "just observe it all mindfully." But mindful of what? Of what's actually wholesome and what's actually not. Stopping at acceptance is unskillful, because it does lead to apathy. But peering through acceptance to see what really is wholesome and what really isn't is skillful, when it leads to right effort, to seeing and abandoning what's actually unwholesome and to seeing and embracing what's actually wholesome. Edit: Then, rinse and repeat.

    DhammaDragon
  • SnakeskinSnakeskin Texas, USA Veteran

    @Kerome said:
    Useful reminders when applied to meditation too... it gives a slightly different balance to sitting practice when you approach it like that, rather than just always and immediately returning to the breath.

    Thatโ€™s my current hangup in meditation by the way - having gotten distracted, how should one return to the breath from the experience of a sequence of thoughts? Immediately and abruptly, or more gently?

    I'd go with gently, the way kindness, compassion, appreciation and equanimity would do it. If that doesn't work, there's five other ways: https://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/mn/mn.020.than.html

    DhammaDragon
  • SnakeskinSnakeskin Texas, USA Veteran

    @federica said:
    ... I don't always pay attention to the breath. I sometimes focus on sensations, how I feel, and concentrate my gaze on the inside of my eyelids.
    I often begin to see swirling colours....

    I do the same, but focus on the center of my brain. I'm gonna try the eyelids. Swirling colors. B)

  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator

    @Snakeskin said:

    @federica said:
    ... I don't always pay attention to the breath. I sometimes focus on sensations, how I feel, and concentrate my gaze on the inside of my eyelids.
    I often begin to see swirling colours....

    I do the same, but focus on the center of my brain. I'm gonna try the eyelids. Swirling colors. B)

    Centre of the brain... Not heard that method before. How, pray, would you do that, exactly?
    I take it that it would be a visualisation, or imagery....?

  • SnakeskinSnakeskin Texas, USA Veteran

    @federica said:

    @Snakeskin said:

    @federica said:
    ... I don't always pay attention to the breath. I sometimes focus on sensations, how I feel, and concentrate my gaze on the inside of my eyelids.
    I often begin to see swirling colours....

    I do the same, but focus on the center of my brain. I'm gonna try the eyelids. Swirling colors. B)

    Centre of the brain... Not heard that method before. How, pray, would you do that, exactly?
    I take it that it would be a visualisation, or imagery....?

    It's not a method, just a calming focal point. First, I have a deeply held belief in the notions of objective and subjective reality, that we don't see reality, we sense it and make a construct of it. The latter is a reflection of the former, the perception of it, the awareness of it, but not the reality itself, e.g., there's the objective reality of the breath, of a breathing body, a beating heart, the pulse, etc., and there's the subjective experience of them. Putting my attention in the center of the brain signals my mind to make a clear distinction between these two and to focus on the reflection, the subjective reality. I don't loose track of the respiration, the body, physical, emotional, mental sensations, but dwell in the strictly subjective experience of them, the awareness itself. It's all real, I assume, but my knowledge of it can't be, I also assume, anything other than in my head. So, that's where I put my attention.

    DhammaDragon
  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator

    Interesting. Thanks. :)

  • @paulyso said:
    thank you dhammadragon.i love it--great reminders.

    <3

    Indeed. We are fragile flowerings. We know how easily our petals fall. Sometimes seeds ...
    Don't dwell that was a good one ...

    HozanDhammaDragonpaulyso
  • paulysopaulyso usa Veteran

    lobster , thank you. learned from you , to readjust if need be,move foward and be well....and stay positive.

    lobsterDhammaDragon
  • TravellerTraveller East Midlands UK Veteran

    Thanks for that one @DhammaDragon, been a while since I read that book, going to have to dig it out and have a re-read.

    DhammaDragon
  • DhammaDragonDhammaDragon Carpe Diem Recidivist Samsarist Veteran

    That's a very positive note, @paulyso.
    Good idea, @Traveller <3

    paulyso
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