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Greed vs seeking more but without attachment

The Buddha was led to his realisations because he was seeking something more than just his current life. Whereas there is the greed of attachment to material goods or other things. There being a difference between things such as exploring the world more and holding on to transient things.

Comments

  • KeromeKerome Love, love is mystery The Continent Veteran

    Do you mean to say that seeking new things in the world is not necessarily unskillful? I think there is a difference between seeking the dharma — as the Buddha did — and seeking to accumulate material things... seeking to explore the world more is somewhere between, I think it depends on having the right intention. Exploring with an intent to find wealth is one thing, while trying to find enlightenment is another.

  • CarameltailCarameltail UK Explorer

    @Kerome said:
    Do you mean to say that seeking new things in the world is not necessarily unskillful? I think there is a difference between seeking the dharma — as the Buddha did — and seeking to accumulate material things... seeking to explore the world more is somewhere between, I think it depends on having the right intention. Exploring with an intent to find wealth is one thing, while trying to find enlightenment is another.

    Could enlightenment be considered a sort of inner wealth? I don't think enlightenment is the end of it though. And yes I agree that exploring the world can be motivated by greed too that is true, like scientists who are in it for some material reason. But taking a walk in the park to experience something you haven't before, I think that is a good thing. Possibly the word seeking has multiple meanings but I mean in the sense of intention. And seeking things in the sense these are transient passing phenomena, seeking to express yourself as part of the world as long as you continue to experience.

  • personperson Don't believe everything you think 'Merica! Veteran

    I heard a teaching recently where it was mentioned that in Pali there are two different words for desire. One which is more like craving for sensual objects like Buddhism teaches about and another which has a more ethically neutral tone like wanting to go to the store or something like that.

    Maybe you can google and find something more specific.

  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator

    @person said:
    I heard a teaching recently where it was mentioned that in Pali there are two different words for desire. One which is more like craving for sensual objects like Buddhism teaches about and another which has a more ethically neutral tone like wanting to go to the store or something like that.

    Maybe you can google and find something more specific.

    Oh.... a bit like the word 'pride'... translated into French it can be meant in two ways: Orgueil and Fierté..
    ... 'Orgueil' is a conceited, self-aggrandisement, 'Fierté' is being pleased with one's efforts in say, achieving first place in an exam, or coming in the top 3 in a sports play-off....

    personlobsterCarameltailHozan
  • @Carameltail said:
    The Buddha was led to his realisations because he was seeking something more than just his current life. Whereas there is the greed of attachment to material goods or other things. There being a difference between things such as exploring the world more and holding on to transient things.

    I see in me clinging even in wholesome activities, letting go, equanimity, pleasant, subtle forms of clinging. It would seem discouraging, but only on the surface. To see how deep a bone fide state of non-attachment goes is inspiring. So, I’ve set aside non-attachment in favor of cultivating disenchantment. It’s a kind of greed, but a kind, I think, that can lead to actual non-attachment, an actual ending of greed.

    “Suppose that a wild deer is living in a wilderness glen. Carefree it walks, carefree it stands, carefree it sits, carefree it lies down. Why is that? Because it has gone beyond the hunter's range.”
    -- Ariyapariyesana Sutta “Noble Search”

    person
  • Could enlightenment be considered a sort of inner wealth? I don't think enlightenment is the end of it though.

    Enlightenment is a good beginning. Enlightenment is priceless but despite that it can not be given away.

    We do not accumulate or store inner wealth, spiritual materialism or siddhi to impress the horses. Rather we practice virtue as a service or example of what humanity, sangha and the arhats (pronounced ourhearts) can do ...

    Those following The Way, poorly or with all the trappings, can travel along the pathway too ...

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