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Suffering automatically ends when you know

JaySonJaySon Florida Veteran

Just thought I'd share this teaching by Ajahn Chah... It's some pretty serious Dharma.

"All creatures in this world are plagued by nothing other than suffering. There is only suffering disturbing the mind. Studying the Dhamma is for the purpose of utterly destroying this suffering. If suffering arises it's because we don't really know it. No matter how much we try to control it through will power, or through wealth and possessions, it is impossible. If we don't thoroughly understand suffering and its cause, no matter how much we try to ''trade it off'' with our deeds, thoughts or worldly riches, there's no way we can do so. Only through clear knowledge and awareness, through knowing the truth of it, can suffering disappear. And this applies not only to homeless ones, the monks and novices, but also to householders: for anybody who knows the truth of things, suffering automatically ceases."

From http://www.ajahnchah.org/book/Toward_Unconditioned1.php

lobsterSocairShoshinpegembaraSnakeskinBuddhadragon

Comments

  • JaySonJaySon Florida Veteran

    @lobster Yeah, I prefer the philosophies of Nagarjuna and Chandrakirti even though they're tough to decipher. Western philosophy has only brought me more misery. But in college it made me sound like one of them smart fellers.

    BunkslobsterSocairCarameltail
  • @JaySon

    Understood. We have to move from being a smartass to having a smart ass; putting a meditation cushion under it ... ;)

    Of course meditation is only one of the Dharma Ways but it is the jewel in the crown ...

    As you say, being smart is just lip gloss. I for one will not put up with sham and shameful 'answers'. Especially my shameful shams ...

    We are Buddhists. o:)
    Suffering not required. <3

    JaySonSocairBuddhadragon
  • JaySonJaySon Florida Veteran

    @lobster When your ass goes numb on the cushion, it doesn't feel like such a smart ass.

    lobsterSocair
  • Suffering automatically ends when you know

    "That All Five Skandhas Are Empty."

    https://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/kn/snp/snp.5.15.than.html

    Always mindful, Mogharaja,
    regard the world as
    empty,
    having removed any view
    in terms of self.
    This way
    one is above and beyond death.
    One who regards the world
    in this way
    isn't seen by Death's King.

    https://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/sn/sn22/sn22.059.nymo.html

    "Bhikkhus, when a noble follower who has heard (the truth) sees thus, he finds estrangement in form, he finds estrangement in feeling, he finds estrangement in perception, he finds estrangement in determinations, he finds estrangement in consciousness.

    "When he finds estrangement, passion fades out. With the fading of passion, he is liberated. When liberated, there is knowledge that he is liberated.

    JaySonSnakeskinBuddhadragon
  • JaySonJaySon Florida Veteran

    @pegembara said:
    Suffering automatically ends when you know

    "That All Five Skandhas Are Empty."

    https://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/kn/snp/snp.5.15.than.html

    Always mindful, Mogharaja,
    regard the world as
    empty,
    having removed any view
    in terms of self.
    This way
    one is above and beyond death.
    One who regards the world
    in this way
    isn't seen by Death's King.

    https://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/sn/sn22/sn22.059.nymo.html

    "Bhikkhus, when a noble follower who has heard (the truth) sees thus, he finds estrangement in form, he finds estrangement in feeling, he finds estrangement in perception, he finds estrangement in determinations, he finds estrangement in consciousness.

    "When he finds estrangement, passion fades out. With the fading of passion, he is liberated. When liberated, there is knowledge that he is liberated.

    What's important, I think, is how this works in a practical way.

    Let's say depression arises in your feelings. Right there you know delusion has arisen in the aggregate of your feelings. That's the first step. Then you must find the root of the depression, which is the knot of self-grasping. You may have had this knot of self-grasping your whole life and it feels like it IS you. You realize it's not self, that your sense of "I" is a total hallucination. Knowing this, the knot of self-grasping begins to untie. Eventually you feel as if that sense of "I" tied to depression is gone and you are liberated from it.

    Snakeskin
  • BuddhadragonBuddhadragon Carpe Diem Samsara Veteran

    Suffering automatically ends when you know and accept that suffering is part of life.
    When you are able to accept life as it, not as you would like it to be.
    When you take in the blows, stand back up again and move on.
    Because you know that suffering is part of life but not all of life.
    And life goes on.

    SocairSnakeskin
  • JaySonJaySon Florida Veteran

    @DhammaDragon said:
    Suffering automatically ends when you know and accept that suffering is part of life.

    That's the first Noble Truth. You're missing the next three. The Buddha taught that there is suffering and there can be an end to suffering because it has a cause and when you uproot the cause, suffering ends. The Eightfold Path leads to the end of suffering.

  • FoibleFullFoibleFull Canada Veteran

    The "understanding" of suffering is not done cognitively or intellectually .... it is part of the experience of being mindful.
    And it is not so much that suffering stops, as that we stop being controlled by it.

    An illustration: My sister's teacher (a Tibetan Geshe named Chodak Tulku Rimpoche, teaching in Minnesota) was dying of pancreatic cancer, which is one of the most painful kind. His family knew, but kept it secret from the students.
    Up until two weeks before his death, he taught Tuesday nights as usual, walking into the shrine room, doing prostrations and climbing up onto the teaching platform with usual vigor. There was no difference in his calm alertness nor compassionate eyes ... the only difference was that now and then he would close his eyes for a minute and site quietly. He would then open his eyes and apologize for the interruption, stating only that he had been "talking with his teachers".
    Note: in Tibetan Buddhism, all negative experiences/people are to be viewed as your "kind teachers", because those are the situations that teach you the most.

    The Geshe was not free of pain, but neither was he controlled by it.

    “Everything is always changing. If you relax into this truth, that is Enlightenment. If you resist, this is samsara (suffering).”
    Dzongsar Jamyang Khyentse, “What Makes You (Not) a Buddhist”

    This is not the same thing as the interpretation that somehow there will be no more pain in life. Although Pema Chodron points out that the more we resist emotional pain, the more it hurts.

    And in the same vein, it is useful to observe people at the flu shot clinics ... the children who resist and build up their fear ahead of time vs the adults who just relax into it and never blink an eye. \
    Even if we just observe ourselves when we are sobbing ... the resistance shown by ragged breath and clenched fists. It is far easier on ourselves to use relaxation and mindfulness to open up to the experience when in an unpleasant situation.

  • BuddhadragonBuddhadragon Carpe Diem Samsara Veteran
    edited February 23

    @JaySon said:

    @DhammaDragon said:
    Suffering automatically ends when you know and accept that suffering is part of life.

    That's the first Noble Truth. You're missing the next three. The Buddha taught that there is suffering and there can be an end to suffering because it has a cause and when you uproot the cause, suffering ends. The Eightfold Path leads to the end of suffering.

    I am not missing the other three noble truths, just not mentioning them because here we are mainly discussing the first one.

  • When we realize conventions as merely conventions.

    ‘The things of this world are merely perceptions of our own creation. Having established them, we get lost in them, giving rise to all kinds of trouble and confusion.’ The mind puts labels upon particular patterns of experience. But the Dhamma is here and now, regardless of what those labels may be.

    If we’ve practised skilfully, then there is ballast, steadiness, like the rocks in the bottom of a ship, holding it steady in the water; the ballast that keeps the ship stable. That quality of vijjā, awakened awareness, is that same kind of ballast, the source of steadiness; the ability to withstand the pushes and pulls of different perceptions, feelings, like a ship withstands the pushes and pulls of the tides and the waves and the wind. If we’ve practised skilfully, then we’ll know these conventions: beginning, ending, retreat, no retreat; Monday, Tuesday, moon day, day after, day before. The wise mind will know that these conventions are merely our own creations, our own human agreements, just to make things work more conveniently. That’s all.

    They’re just human agreements. Catholic, Buddhist, Pope, human, woman, man; these are conventions of our own creation. ‘Having established them, we get lost in them, giving rise to all kinds of trouble and confusion.’ We know these are conventions, empty, intrinsically insubstantial, like a lump of foam, a mirage, a bubble; like a shaft of sunlight coming through the window; there’s a form, but no substance. There is no thing there, no solid essence. When we see the world like this, then the heart is free, stable, clear, invulnerable. No thing can disturb.
    https://www.amaravati.org/dhamma-article-ajahn-amaro-end-dukkha-now/

    Traveller
  • TravellerTraveller East Midlands UK Veteran

    @pegembara, Thank you for that awesome teaching by Ajahn Amaro it gave me a minor moment of insight. I see how clinging to conventions causes suffering. I have been thinking of awakened awareness as a true self in the Brahman/Atman sense - I know see it as essenceless, beyond all limits and conventions, I'm a little bit more enlightened thanks to that. Thank you so much once again!

    lobster
  • lobsterlobster Veteran

    I found the pali term vijja intriguing from @pegembara post, looked it up. Found:

    Vijja Sutta: Knowledge (excerpt)
    translated from the Pali by
    Maurice O'Connell Walshe © 2009

    Those who know not suffering,
    Nor how suffering comes to be,
    Nor yet how all such suffering
    To a final end is brought,

    They do not know the Path
    Leading to its calming down,
    Cannot find the heart's release
    Cannot be by wisdom freed,
    With no chance to make an end,
    To birth and aging they're condemned.

    Those who do know suffering,
    And how suffering comes to be,
    Know too how all such suffering
    To a final end is brought,

    They who know the Path indeed
    Leading to its calming down,
    They can find the heart's release,
    They can be by wisdom freed.
    They know how to make an end,
    To birth and aging no more bound.

    http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/sn/sn56/sn56.022x.wlsh.html

    Traveller
  • TravellerTraveller East Midlands UK Veteran
    edited March 14

    Do not try to become anything. Do not make yourself into anything. Do not be a meditator. Do not become enlightened. When you sit, let it be. When you walk, let it be. Grasp at nothing. Resist nothing.” – Ajahn Chah

    I thought it was time for more Ajahn Chah serious Dharma. I don't know if the insight will pass, I've had moments like this before, there is still the tendency to cling in my mind but its very easy to let go of.

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