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Easter for Buddhists

lobsterlobster Veteran
edited April 20 in Faith & Religion

Lobsters guide to Easter B)

  • Good Frigsday/Friday - this is when Almighty Baby Jesus, fully grown arrived in town on a miracle uber-donkey. The donkey could not talk, like in Shrek. Everyone shouted Havannah and gave him leaves as money was uncool in olden days.
  • Easter Sunnyday - Thanos the god killer, nails Magic Jesus to wood (don't worry he escapes in the End Game)
  • Moonday morning - Thor/JC is risen like dough/duh. It's a conjuring miracle!

To celebrate the Christian Pagan East-err we eat chocolate bunnies, vegan eggs made of consumer grade chocolate and offer the following prayer:

Go in Peace. See you at Christmas. <3

Do you engage in this consumer sponsored minor holiday?

ShoshinKundo

Comments

  • JeffreyJeffrey Veteran

    Remember to leave out chocolate eggs and easter basket grass for the magical Snoop Easter Dogg on 420 eve! :p

    lobsterRowan1980
  • DavidDavid some guy Veteran
    edited April 20

    I celebrate the Easter weekend for a couple of reasons but they don't have much to do with the death of Jesus.

    It's usually the first really nice weekend of spring (not this year though) so I've made it a combination of New Years and the Spring Equinox. I've been doing that for years.

    My daughter is 5 now and likes the egg hunt and fancies an Easter bunny. We tell her it's a celebration of life and that is pretty much what Easter is anyways.

    I go through a lot of peanut butter dunking chocolate bunnies. But I don't need an excuse for that.

    lobster
  • ShoshinShoshin No one in particular Nowhere Special Veteran
    edited April 20

    Easter for Buddhists

    Not really... Easter's for Bunnies


    There're lots of bunnies around these parts...and they breed like rabbits ;)

    . Hope you all have had a good Friday :)

  • BunksBunks Australia Veteran

    Easter is not a Buddhist celebration. I enjoy a few days off work and watch people gorge themselves on chocolate.

    Jesus who?

    lobsterVastmindShoshin
  • KeromeKerome Love, love is mystery The Continent Veteran

    I take any excuse for a holiday going. I usually enjoy a bit of the Matthaus Passion on tv, might watch the odd Bodhi Jesus-oriented film, have Easter Brunch with the family. So I do celebrate it a little through participating.

  • FosdickFosdick in its eye are mirrored far off mountains Alaska, USA Veteran

    My wife has taught me to hide a bunch of junky candy for her to find, and I've done it every year for the last 40. Then, on the day after, we invariably go to the grocery to pick up the marked down leftovers. Other than that, no.

    It sometimes seems to me that there is a germ of the sense of rebirth lurking in here somewhere, but the Christians have yet to see or develop it. Maybe someday, but until then, really low-quality imitation chocolate will have to suffice.

  • VastmindVastmind Memphis, TN Veteran
    edited April 20

    The minor league baseball team here (Go Redbirds !! ) are hosting an Easter brunch before their game on Sunday...so I’ll be there. Should be fun! I’m determined not to go get the clearance candy the day after this year, since I’m trying to limit my sugar! They did an egg hunt at work, but I didn’t participate bec of course it involved prayer and praise. Not my cup of tea. No big deal...y’all have fun with it.

    Rowan1980
  • Rowan1980Rowan1980 Keeper of the Zoo Asheville, NC Veteran

    I am more looking forward to the post-holiday sales on Easter candy. ;)

    Kundo
  • adamcrossleyadamcrossley Veteran
    edited April 20

    Some extracts from Thich Nhat Hanh’s Living Buddha, Living Christ:

    “On the altar in my hermitage in France are images of Buddha and Jesus, and every time I light incense, I touch both of them as my spiritual ancestors.”

    “It is not words or concepts that are important. What is important is our insight into the nature of reality and our way of responding to reality. If the Buddha had been born into the society in which Jesus was born, I think he, too, would have been crucified.”

    “Before the Vietnamese monk Thich Quang Duc burned himself alive in 1963, he meditated for several weeks and then wrote very loving letters to his government, his church, and his fellow monks and nuns explaining why he had reached that decision. When you are motivated by love and the willingness to help others attain understanding, even self-immolation can be a compassionate act. When Jesus allowed Himself to be crucified, He was acting in the same way, motivated by the desire to wake people up, to restore understanding and compassion, and to save people.”

    “All of us possess the energy of mindfulness, the energy of the Holy Spirit, only its intensity and strength vary in each person. Our daily practice is to increase, to strengthen that power. There is no need to wait until Easter to celebrate. When the Holy Spirit is present, Jesus is already here.”

    federicalobster
  • DakiniDakini Veteran
    edited April 20

    When did Good Friday become a holiday? It wasn't, when I was a kid and young adult. Where I currently live, in NM, it is, because it's a Hispanic state, which means--Catholic. But in CA it wasn't a holiday, nor in WA. Later, some businesses chose to make it one for their employees, but it's not a state holiday in West Coast states, AFAIK.

    It's the Resurrection that I can't swallow. (Chocolate--I can swallow, though I shouldn't. :blush: ). I think Jesus recovered from his ordeal, as he'd been treated with herbs in the hope that he would, and went on to continue a life of teaching. I found reference to a couple of apocryphal books/scripture, that say that's what happened, but I didn't write down their titles, unfortunately.

    Anyway, that's just me.

    Shoshin
  • KundoKundo Sydney, Australia Veteran

    @Dakini said:
    When did Good Friday become a holiday? It wasn't, when I was a kid and young adult. Where I currently live, in NM, it is, because it's a Hispanic state, which means--Catholic. But in CA it wasn't a holiday, nor in WA. Later, some businesses chose to make it one for their employees, but it's not a state holiday in West Coast states, AFAIK.

    It's the Resurrection that I can't swallow. (Chocolate--I can swallow, though I shouldn't. :blush: ). I think Jesus recovered from his ordeal, as he'd been treated with herbs in the hope that he would, and went on to continue a life of teaching. I found reference to a couple of apocryphal books/scripture, that say that's what happened, but I didn't write down their titles, unfortunately.

    Anyway, that's just me.

    It's always been a public holiday in Australia. Recently though, businesses are starting to operate regardless.

  • ShoshinShoshin No one in particular Nowhere Special Veteran

    It's the Resurrection that I can't swallow. (Chocolate--I can swallow, though I shouldn't. :blush: )

    ....no doubt many will be doing just that.....and regretting it later :lol: :lol:

    Dakinilobster
  • lobsterlobster Veteran

    Happy Easter every one,

    I am glad Jesus does not die, all superhero’s should be immortal. Buddha too is a superhero.

    Bunksadamcrossley
  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator

    ... who died.... but then again, don't we all? Even RDJ will one day rust and fade away...

  • KeromeKerome Love, love is mystery The Continent Veteran

    Here in the Netherlands it is a pretty strong tradition, with all kinds of coverage on the media. There is this show called The Passion where a cast of characters take over a town and there is an organised procession of a cross through the town and the Jesus story is told in song and music on stage and by the characters around the town.

  • JeffreyJeffrey Veteran

    Outside the library where I do tutoring.

    Shoshinlobster
  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator

    The resurrection has often been cited as a metaphor for the renewal of life. This is why Christians purloined the Feast of Oestros as a pretty good explanation of Christ's rising from the dead.
    Reincarnation was an accepted and very common belief in Christian circles, until it finally dawned on Church authorities that reincarnation meant that the threat of hell-fires and damnation wouldn't be effective, as part of God's authority, so they decreed reincarnation a no-no...

    When you consider that the Feast of Easter is a moveable one (decided on the phases of the moon) it's easy to see why and how Church elders could happily move the goalposts to suit their stories....

    Kerome
  • DakiniDakini Veteran
    edited April 22

    @Kerome said:
    Here in the Netherlands it is a pretty strong tradition, with all kinds of coverage on the media. There is this show called The Passion where a cast of characters take over a town and there is an organised procession of a cross through the town and the Jesus story is told in song and music on stage and by the characters around the town.

    I didn't know the Netherlands did that. I thought only Catholic countries did. That sort of thing is huge in Latin America. Isn't the Netherlands a secular society? Sorry, I'm a little confused here. Is the majority of the population religious? If so, do they actually believe in the Resurrection, or is the show/play/re-enactment more of a cultural heritage tradition?

  • DakiniDakini Veteran
    edited April 22

    @federica said:
    The resurrection has often been cited as a metaphor for the renewal of life. This is why Christians purloined the Feast of Oestros as a pretty good explanation of Christ's rising from the dead.
    Reincarnation was an accepted and very common belief in Christian circles, until it finally dawned on Church authorities that reincarnation meant that the threat of hell-fires and damnation wouldn't be effective, as part of God's authority, so they decreed reincarnation a no-no...

    When you consider that the Feast of Easter is a moveable one (decided on the phases of the moon) it's easy to see why and how Church elders could happily move the goalposts to suit their stories....

    Belief in reincarnation or rebirth doesn't stop some Buddhists from preaching hellfire and damnation. I don't see how that would conflict with belief in reincarnation or rebirth...?

  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator

    It's different for a Theistic religion that needs to be in cgrge and the ultimate Authority on all matters Godly.... The Catholic Council outlawed it as a teaching, in Medieval times...

    In the early medieval period, the doctrines of pre-existence and reincarnation only existed as Jesus’ secret teachings. In 553 AD this information was declared heresy at the Second Council of Constantinople. The Roman Church decided to destroy all the teachings which talked about it. The Catholic doctrine and the priests’ source of wealth could have been in danger if people believed that they would come back to life many times. The old knowledge faced the same fate as many ancient books by pre-Christian writers. The bishops were afraid of the knowledge which could prove that the institution of the Church wasn't the only option to bring “eternal life” to people.

    From here.

    Going against ancient teachings and the existence of Christ's own secret teachings (to his most trusted disciples) meant that Church elders could exert more pressure, influence and power over their flock.

    KeromeDakinilobster
  • KeromeKerome Love, love is mystery The Continent Veteran

    @Dakini said:

    @Kerome said:
    Here in the Netherlands it is a pretty strong tradition, with all kinds of coverage on the media. There is this show called The Passion where a cast of characters take over a town and there is an organised procession of a cross through the town and the Jesus story is told in song and music on stage and by the characters around the town.

    I didn't know the Netherlands did that. I thought only Catholic countries did. That sort of thing is huge in Latin America. Isn't the Netherlands a secular society? Sorry, I'm a little confused here. Is the majority of the population religious? If so, do they actually believe in the Resurrection, or is the show/play/re-enactment more of a cultural heritage tradition?

    Yes, the Netherlands is largely secular now, with about 25% Christians, 50% “something”-ists, and 25% atheists. But it has a Bible Belt and a strong Christian heritage, with the Catholic Church being a slight majority of practicing Christians. It all comes out during the holidays, with Christmas and Easter still being quite strongly represented.

    The 50% “something”-ists are called that because they believe there is something there, but they don’t affiliate directly with a church although in a pinch they might call that something god. So they sometimes come along and Christian or religious shows of various denominations get a pretty good audience.

    The show The Passion has been quite clever in getting celebrities to turn up and do some of the singing on stage, and it’s quite a large production, with television coverage over several days. It’s more showbizz than religion.

  • lobsterlobster Veteran

    Jesus who?

    ;)

    In the Allah Dharma (currently unpopular) the often banned dervishes chant Who, Who or rather Hoo! Hoo!

    Believe it or not they are not all followers of The Doctor

    “This is who I am, right here, right now, all right? All that counts is here and now, and this is me!”
    — The Doctor, Season 1, Episode 2

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