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tingling when meditating

edited May 2010 in Meditation
I'm learning Buddhist meditation, and although I've been interested in Buddhism for years, I'm not religiously inclined, so I recently found a course for non-buddhists.

Anyway, I find if I do any body-focused meditation, e.g. body of light or focusing on that point below the heart (sorry can't remember what it's called), I very quickly find that I start to get tingling/prickling sensations which can last for a couple of hours. It's not usually unpleasant, but I am interested to find out how common this was, and whether I should be trying to stop it.

I know I should probably ask in the class, but I'm a bit shy about it.

I'm a little divorced from my body, I tend to live inside my own head, so I was wondering if it was just due to the fact I have to focus on my physicality in some way as the object of these meditations that brings all these sensations out.

Sorry if this doesn't make any sense.

Comments

  • ManiMani Veteran
    edited March 2010
    Hi Anna, and welcome!

    I think that it would be helpful to push away the shyness and ask your teacher this question. It also never hurts to see a doctor, to make sure it is nothing physical either.

    It is difficult to answer, because I'm not clear on the method of meditation you are learning. Sometimes sensation's and things may occur during meditation, but in my experience, most physical sensations usually cease once you stop practicing.

    M
  • edited March 2010
    I'm fairly certain it's not medical - it is physical though. I have been learning the beginnings of Mahamudra practice.
  • edited March 2010
    It could be various things. Simply noticing what you haven't paid attention to before or a physiological change caused by your increased attention. It's not uncommon at all.
  • DhammaDhatuDhammaDhatu Veteran
    edited March 2010
    anna;93078 said:
    I very quickly find that I start to get tingling/prickling sensations which can last for a couple of hours.
    Hi Anna

    This happens due to your consciousness mind & a nervous system throughout your body.
    I'm a little divorced from my body
    Not any more.
    so I was wondering if it was just due to the fact I have to focus on my physicality in some way as the object of these meditations that brings all these sensations out.
    Yes it is.
    Sorry if this doesn't make any sense.
    It makes perfect sense and is simply natural.

    Be at ease. Enjoy your learning.

    Kind regards

    DD

    :)
  • edited April 2010
    Thank you for the replies. I still find I experience this though not as strongly. I also notice that I shake very slightly (e.g my hands). I feel it seems to be a release of tension (I'm phsyically a very tight/tense person).
  • DhammaDhatuDhammaDhatu Veteran
    edited April 2010
    anna;96303 said:
    Thank you for the replies. I still find I experience this though not as strongly. I also notice that I shake very slightly (e.g my hands). I feel it seems to be a release of tension (I'm phsyically a very tight/tense person).
    Dear Anna

    The more one meditates, the more the tensions within come to the surface into conscious awareness. In coming into conscious awareness, these tensions also dissolve by nature.

    Trust in mind.

    Kind regards

    :)
  • FoibleFullFoibleFull Veteran
    edited April 2010
    I've stayed within the confines of Tibetan Buddhism, but have not encountered any types of meditation like those described. What schools of Buddhism teach body meditation and/or meditating on the lower chakras?
  • edited April 2010
  • edited April 2010
    No offence is intended here, but members from every faith claim to feel certain things when meditating, praying, e.t.c It could just be in your mind, if it isn't. Well, I'm sure its nothing to be worried about. But its awfully hard to be sure, seeing as none of us know quite what you're going through! :)
    But all, the best and I hope all is well, as I'm sure it is.
  • edited April 2010
    Yeah I get this too - sometimes it can be unpleasent, other times it's just there.

    I think it might be this... - http://www.shinzen.org/shinsub3/artIcky.htm
  • edited April 2010
    RagsToRich;97861 said:
    Yeah I get this too - sometimes it can be unpleasent, other times it's just there.

    I think it might be this... - http://www.shinzen.org/shinsub3/artIcky.htm
    Thanks for the link, it's rather useful.
  • edited April 2010
    FoibleFull;96505 said:
    I've stayed within the confines of Tibetan Buddhism, but have not encountered any types of meditation like those described. What schools of Buddhism teach body meditation and/or meditating on the lower chakras?
    I'm sorry I missed this post. I'm attending an NKT meditation class, and these were meditations on the nature of mind not the body, but they did involve being aware of or within your body.
  • lightwithinlightwithin Veteran
    edited May 2010
    I don't experience tingling myself, but I experience all kinds of other bodily sensations, both during and outside of meditation.

    It's not easy to concentrate when your body won't cooperate, but it CAN be done if you don't get hung up on the bodily sensations, and by this I mean, to feel them, acknowledge them, and then let them pass, instead of dwelling on them and commenting/narrating them.

    Both your body and mind are in constant flux and if you stick to focusing on the breath and intend to stay present, even with all the distractions going on, you'll reach a point where the distractions don't seem to "matter" all that much anymore. Where they lose their weight and importance.

    Trying to "stop" it, won't be of any help either, it will just give the sensations more power and divert your focus while taking you away from the present moment.
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