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Dharma Sunday: SN 22: 87. Vakkali

CarlitaCarlita Bastian please! Save us!United States Veteran
edited February 5 in Philosophy

The fool may be known by his deeds. Likewise, the wise one may be known by his deeds. Wisdom is manifested by one’s deeds.
https://suttacentral.net/en/an3.2

And

One who sees the Dhamma sees me and one who sees me sees the Dhamma. Truly, seeing the Dhamma, one sees me and seeing me, one sees the Dhamma
https://suttacentral.net/en/sn22.87

If we looked way from The Dharma, who is The Buddha apart from it? If we looked at both the same then who is The Buddha within the three jewels?

Snakeskin

Comments

  • KeromeKerome Love, love is mystery The Continent Veteran

    On the first sutra, I’d agree that the character of a man may more truly be known by his deeds than by his words.

    On the second sutra, the teachings of the Buddha are the truest impression we have of his mind. It’s not about a physical seeing. That’s why it can be said that those who know the dharma also know the Buddha. And why a Buddha without the dharma would be an empty symbol of meditation.

    Snakeskin
  • SnakeskinSnakeskin Texas, USA Veteran

    In the second sutta, the Buddha visited Vakkali, who was sick and dying. Though virtuous, as in the first sutta, Vakkali told the Buddha he felt remorse. When the Buddha asked why, Vakkali said he regretted his inability to go see the Buddha. The Buddha replied, “Enough, Vakkali! Why do you want to see this foul body? One who sees the Dhamma sees me and one who sees me sees the Dhamma... What do you think, Vakkali, is form permanent or impermanent?”— “Impermanent, venerable sir.”…—“Therefore … Seeing thus … He understands: ‘… there is no more for this state of being.”

    Soon after, Vakkali came to see the aggregates as unequivocally impermanent and unsatisfactory and became dispassionate toward them. After relaying this to the Buddha via some monks, he ended his life before his illness did. Elsewhere, seeing “a cloud of smoke, a swirl of darkness” traversing various directions, the Buddha said to the monks in his company, “That, bhikkhus, is Mara the Evil One searching for the consciousness of the clansman Vakkali, wondering: ‘Where now has the consciousness of the clansman Vakkali been established?’ However, bhikkhus, with consciousness unestablished, the clansman Vakkali has attained final Nibbāna.”

    @Carlita said:
    If we looked way from The Dharma, who is The Buddha apart from it? If we looked at both the same then who is The Buddha within the three jewels?

    The Buddha says “one who sees the Dhamma sees me and one who sees me sees the Dhamma,” but I'd say this doesn't mean a buddha and the Dhamma are the same. Instead, a buddha embodies the Dhamma. There could be no buddha apart from the Dhamma, but there is always the Dhamma whether or not anyone embodies it.

    The Blessed One is worthy and rightly self-awakened, consummate in clear knowing and conduct, well-gone, an expert with regard to the cosmos, unexcelled trainer of tamable people, teacher of beings human and divine, awakened, blessed.

    The Dhamma is well expounded by the Blessed One, directly visible, immediate, inviting one to come and see, worthy of application, to be personally experienced by the wise.

    To me the Buddha within the three jewels is the one who awakens to the Dhamma, realizes and embodies it, then guides others to realize and embody it themselves, the Sanga.

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