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Jason · God Emperor · Moderator

About

Username
Jason
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Arrakis
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Co-Founder, Moderator
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Location
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Comments

  • Seems to be an idea finding popularity with some in the scientific field such as Sam Harris and Robert Wright.
  • @federica said: So it's up to the students, is it, to evaluate and decide, discern and evaluate? Well thanks a bunch for the heads up..! While you make a good point, the Buddha did advise care in selecting a teacher (AN 4.192, MN 95), and…
  • @Kerome said: At various times in my life I have had a number of collections... stamps for a while when I was younger, science fiction and fantasy paperbacks, comics. The thing that is left over which I still have is a sizeable hoard of dvd’s. Ha…
  • Might I asked what teacher?
  • I don't know. On the one hand, it can seem like maybe they aren't serious about the practice, or else aren't any further along it than we are. It seems to us like a weakness, a flaw, a sign that they're just like anybody else and nothing special spi…
  • It may imply elitism is some cases, but I see it more about making a specific commitment with regard to both a teacher and a particular practice. It's an important part of those kinds of practices themselves. I definitely think some practices are be…
  • Capitalism is the proximate cause of this, as well as the broader environmental degradation, habitat destruction, and overconsumption that's causing other extinctions. A system built on greed and the need for accumulation for accumulation's sake isn…
  • It seems to me that it's referring to the experience and intuitive understanding of emptiness.
  • @JaySon said: "There is no need to study all the expressions of Dharma or know all the rules. To cut a path through the forest, you need not cut down all the trees. Cutting just one row can take you to the other side." -Ajahn Chah Reminds…
  • @person said: I don't know how to ask this in a completely constructive way. How do we distinguish this view of freedom, which sounds correct and wise to me, and apathy where nothing matters? I don't know, but I suspect the distinction li…
  • * Welcome to the forum. * One doesn't need to have had any sort of "formal" teaching to have an interest in practicing, whether in a monastic setting or otherwise. The desire itself is enough to explore the possibility. * Practice and study with a…
  • What can I say, I'm an unsavoury person.
  • My new favourite thing from Ludovico Technique.
  • An example of Buddhist economics can be found in DN 5. For context, he brahmin Kutadanta asks the Buddha for advice on how to best conduct a great sacrifice. Kutadanta, who was evidently wealthy, had been given a village and some land by King Bim…
  • In Theravada, they also have four types of clinging, although they differ a bit: And what is clinging, what is the origin of clinging, what is the cessation of clinging, what is the way leading to the cessation of clinging? There are these fou…
  • Thich Nhat Hanh is one of the greatest spiritual teachers of my lifetime. He's pretty much this generation's Buddhist Jesus. He will be greatly missed when he's gone, but we're so lucky to have had him for as long as we did. He's put a lot of good i…
  • @ERose said: @Jason "Science, on the other hand, takes the position that the more knowledge we have about things as they are is always preferable to willful ignorance of any aspect of that. " Double blind studies. The Uncertainty Principle…
  • I think that raises and interesting paradox in the sense of Buddhism being about "knowledge and vision of things as they are" and the idea that ignorance of certain things is beneficial. Science, on the other hand, takes the position that the more k…
  • That's nice, @Kerome. On the one hand, it's an interesting perspective. We tend to live as if this life is our one and only chance, and either we die and disappear forever or we go to some eternal destination based upon this single, relatively short…
  • @federica said: Jim Pym ('You don't have to sit on the Floor' and Listen to the Light') is both a Zen Monk AND a Celebrant in the Society of Friends (better known as Quakers)... I also know of a Trappist priest who is also a Zen roshi, Ke…
  • I highly recommend The Radical King if you're interested in learning more.
  • @adamcrossley said: Could an argument be made that at ordination level, it’s wise to focus one’s efforts on one path, whereas for lay followers, the ecumenical approach is better? One could be made, but one of my teachers was a Thai Thera…
  • @Amanaki said: @Jason said: @Amanaki said: It is ok you do not agree The reason one should only follow one path/ one teacher at one time is that if you mix teachers and path the enlightenment status or fr…
  • @Amanaki said: It is ok you do not agree The reason one should only follow one path/ one teacher at one time is that if you mix teachers and path the enlightenment status or frutation will not start. You will be learning same wisdom over and …
  • @Amanaki said: Why do you mix teaching from different Buddhist paths? And not even the same Buddha or Bodisattva? One path is difficult enough so why the mix? Why not? Wisdom is valuable no matter where we find it.
  • @David said: @person said: @Jason said: @person said: @Jason said: https://samharris.org/podcasts/free-will-revisited/, https://samha…
  • I think what's ultimately being debated here is one of the most interesting questions in neuroscience, do we intend and then make/condition the synapses in our brain to fire, or do the synapses fire in our brain and cause/condition us to intend? …
  • @person said: Alright, I'm pretty sure I understand what you're saying in that the conventional self is the personal experience. What I think I'm saying is more or less the exact opposite, that the conventional self is the sum of all the causes a…
  • @person said: @Jason said: https://samharris.org/podcasts/free-will-revisited/, https://samharris.org/podcasts/115-sam-harris-lawrence-krauss-matt-dillahunty-1/, https://samharris.org/podcasts/124-search-reality/. I think t…
  • @federica said: I'm not sure how this is relevant, and indeed, whether it is at all... But I found it, and made a conscious decision (I think...!) that it might be of interest...? https://qz.com/506229/neuroscience-backs-up-the-buddhist-be…
  • @David said: Couldn't there be a set of conditions that when reached allows us to shape events in unpredictable ways? I'm not sure there could be, because it'd mean conditionality somehow shaping something unconditioned or with the capabi…
  • @David said: I was just thinking about our conversation here and it dawned on me that I don't think that's true because after being hooked up to the machine they could predict seven seconds before the choice is made. I would have to know s…
  • @ColinA said: Thank you all very much for all of the information, links and recommendations. One further question, does one have to be decided on a school or branch of buddhism before making a commitment to following a path? Nope. Just co…
  • @David said: It's so weird how it seems like we are saying the same thing at times. The last paragraph is where I find the meaning but I don't think volition is an illusion for a lack of a controller and that's a big difference I guess. I…
  • @David said: I'm not sure of course but by my thinking, the experiment could also show that we make choices before we are aware of it. That wouldn't say volition is illusion but that the brain works faster than our perceptions. So we choo…
  • @person said: @Jason said: Frogs have a cause, through long periods of evolution, much of which was simply fortuitous accidents and mutations that allowed certain species to grow and thrive so their descendants became the frongs we …
  • @adamcrossley said: What name do you prefer (if any) for Enlightenment? And how do you interpret the different names? Do you differentiate between the Buddha’s Enlightenment and that achievable by us normal folk? More specifically, can any…
  • @person said: @Jason said: So when you say, for example, that kamma is our only true possession, I'd counter with who exactly is it that is the possessor? In the conventional sense, we can say it's our temporal selves, this person w…
  • Thanks for the video @person. It's interesting, but I think the commentors did a good job of explaining why the thought experiment is a bit of sleight of hand.
  • @David said: Things in life do need a cause. That is the point. So far I have not heard a possible cause for an illusion of control to come about that doesn't require a leap of reason. Coming back to this for a moment, one possible…
  • What's funny is, about 10-15 years ago, I used to argue vehemently against that passage. And now, here I am using it to argue for what I once argued against.
  • @David said: @Jason See, right now I see somebody using a tool to prove said tool has no purpose. Its baffling and fascinating at the same time. Individuality is an illusory tool. That doesn't mean it is according to any plan…
  • @David said: It's why Buddha got up from his tree. If he saw no meaning then he made meaning. He could have started walking in any number of directions after standing up but he went back to Sidharthas friends and family. I think he did…
  • @David said: @Jason said: @David said: Things in life do need a cause. That is the point. Exactly, even our choices. It seems to me that when you say point and mean cause, you're also unintent…
  • @David said: One of the definitions of nihilism is that life has no meaning. That's not a Buddhism I know. The Buddhism I know is engaging. Ok, I'll bite. What's the meaning of life? What is its purpose? And does that mean by exten…
  • @David said: Things in life do need a cause. That is the point. Exactly, even our choices. It seems to me that when you say point and mean cause, you're also unintentionally implying meaning. Like, 'If things are causally determined, what…
  • @David said: But what is the point? We will either develop skillful means or not so due diligence is not necessary. Sufferings cessation will come about whether we adhere to the dharma or not. Nothing we do can prevent it or bring it about. Other…
  • Dawn of Ashes just released a new video from their upcoming album.
  • @person said: @Jason said: @person said: To me the whole debate seems a lot like the Two Truths doctrine. That there is an ultimate truth (conditionality) where cause and effect lose distinction and a conventiona…