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Kerome · Love, love is mystery · Veteran

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Kerome
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The Continent
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Comments

  • I think there is an avenue to practice mindfulness there, and maybe find some underlying assumptions if the Christchurch killings arouse more shock and compassion in you than the Ethiopian Airlines crash. In terms of human suffering, the airplane cr…
  • @lobster said: How long will it take this atrocity to slip into forgetfulness? Not long is my bet ... a week or two, tops. Pictures are harder to excise. Pictures of my potential. Exactly. Everyday atrocities against peo…
  • @yoda_soda said: But I know Vajrayana practice requires a guru (and I probably won't find one where I'm living). Are there aspects of it I could practice through independent study? If its vajrayana in particular that has peaked your inter…
  • This is very much as Thich Nhat Hanh explains things as well. Personally I understand it, but I’ve always wondered if what we can see is all there is. The explanation for that which I’ve liked ever since coming across it a few years ago is that “in …
  • I love the Persian Sufi poets, especially Rumi, Attar and Hakim Sanai. They just have a particular flavour which calls to me.
  • The Tibetan tradition has four major schools, each with a quite different approach to learning and practice. The Gelugpa (yellow hats) for example put the emphasis on a thorough understanding before proceeding on to practice, while the Nyingma and t…
  • Melt yourself down in this search: venture your life and your soul in the path of sincerity; strive to pass from nothingness to being, and make yourself drunk with the wine of God. — Hakim Sanai, the Hadiqa: The Walled Garden of Truth
  • @genkaku said: Perhaps there are those who say "there is no need to see hard evidence." To which I reply, "oh yes there is." Personally I don’t need to see it. I’m grateful I or my loved ones weren’t caught up in it, but i’ll believe the …
  • I think it is often about letting go of things, and bringing awareness to those parts of yourself that had been unaware. In a way as you proceed along the journey you become more yourself, more aware of who and what you are. It’s not going to anothe…
  • @lobster said: Sumedha reflects on the vast inner journey required to discover unshakeable wisdom and compassion. He describes compassion as a tapestry woven of many threads: generosity, virtue, renunciation, wisdom, energy, patience, truthfulnes…
  • @Shoshin said: ,,,and god is a teapot Do you know Bertrand Russell?
    in Love Comment by Kerome March 15
  • @Traveller said: if there is no "I" there who is it that makes the decision? The decision spontaneously arises in your mind depending on the conditions resulting from your past life, you only think that you’ve made it, retroactively. Or t…
    in Love Comment by Kerome March 14
  • Perhaps it was so, there are definitely tantalising hints that Jesus travelled to India. I think as a whole the Christian religion has more than a few downsides, and it helps people who are still stuck within the faith bubble of a church to look at …
    in Love Comment by Kerome March 14
  • Not every nights dreams are auspicious... last night I had dreams of gay sex with an older gentleman... not at all my usual cup of tea, lol. But i’ve been keeping a dream journal for the past two years, and the variety of dreams is huge, and expecti…
  • I think the words ‘good’ and ‘bad’ in an ultimate sense are not truly useful, like the word ‘evil’. These words have acquired a kind of loaded meaning which causes some people to identify and buy in rather than thinking for themselves. It can often …
    in Good and Bad Comment by Kerome March 13
  • @lobster said: Outwardly I'm a fool and inwardly I live with a clear spiritual system. There is some truth in that, that you can appear outwardly very spiritual like my acquaintance, and inwardly have completely lost the plot, followin…
  • @JaySon said: The other night Jesus threw me into hell. Satan offered me friendship. I asked his henchman if Satan were a self-cherishing being. Then I proceeded to turn into a many-armed Heruka and fought him while chanting some weird mantra I'v…
  • I came across someone the other day who had been a buddhist for quite a long time but then had a psychotic episode where first she started seeing buddha’s everwhere, imagined she was a high reincarnated lama and all kinds of things... then the psych…
  • It depends on how you choose to suffer, I guess.
  • @Traveller said: If there is no stone buddha, what does the shit stick to @Kerome? Without a convenient stone Buddha to sit on, the droppings will probably be spread over a large area, including some hitting people! Obviously having a sto…
  • “that stone Buddha deserves all the birdshit it gets I wave my skinny arms like a tall flower in the wind” ― Ikkyu, Crow with No Mouth I think it depends on one’s nature... some people are served by being very grounded, other people can li…
  • I asked someone on another forum “where do thoughts come from?” He replied “where does fire come from?” Which I thought was a particularly beautiful answer as it points the way very nicely. The general idea is that when there is a trigger and con…
  • @yoda_soda said: @Kerome So you have coffee before meditation? Interesting. Does that help? It just helps me wake up and stay focussed, the risk with early morning meditation is that you can still be sleepy. It’s a help in some ways, in t…
  • I usually meditate sometime in the morning. I hear that HHDL likes to meditate at 4 AM, I tend to sleep a bit longer, then coffee first thing.
  • Making more money usually comes at the cost of increased responsibility, which is fine up to a point, but you need to take care of yourself. Stress can cause you to burn out. There is nothing wrong with living a modest, simple and frugal life. As…
  • From DN 31... "And what six ways of squandering wealth are to be avoided? Young man, heedlessness caused by intoxication, roaming the streets at inappropriate times, habitual partying, compulsive gambling, bad companionship, and laziness are t…
  • @person said: @Kerome said: ...even investing in stock markets. Are you talking about stock brokers, day traders and such or do you extend that to personal long term investment for retirement and general wealth growth?…
  • Then there’s this... And what is wrong livelihood? Scheming, persuading, hinting, belittling, & pursuing gain with gain. This is wrong livelihood. From MN 117. Think of politics, marketing, advertising, lobbying, even investing …
  • I think I’d stick roughly to lines laid out by the Five Precepts, so I would try to keep my mind from forming attachments to killing, stealing, sexual misconduct, lying, intoxication or addiction. You wouldn’t want to be too strict, in order to t…
  • @me2 said: Poverty causes suffering that is not found in wealth. I’m not too sure about that. Extreme poverty yes, but there are gradations. One can be poor and still have a roof over your head, food to eat and clothes to wear. Most peopl…
  • @ZenSam said: @Shoshin we basically agree. Except that you use totally different wording
    in Zazen Comment by Kerome March 6
  • I just wanted to share the reaction of another friend knowledgeable in the dharma from a non-English forum to this question, which I’ve freely translated... The practice I follow is that of Chenrezig, which emphasises compassion, loving kindne…
  • To me the main question is, does @ZenSam’s vision of Kabbalah applied to Buddhism hold water, or is he trying to make a square peg fit a round hole? From the definitions of samsara and nirvana it seems like it is the latter, and the whole question i…
  • @Jason said: "was an unskillful bodily [verbal, mental] action with painful consequences, painful results, then you should confess it, reveal it, lay it open to the Teacher or to a knowledgeable companion in the holy life. Having confessed it... …
  • You’re right that in absolute terms there are a lot of variations on bias. But I think the motivation is crucial — as long as people agree that they want the truth, there is usually a way to get there. And on that level, there aren’t a lot of ifs an…
  • If its in the Oxford dictionary it must be in the public eye But it is a phrase I have some doubts about because it seems to condone not doing the best you can to tell the truth. The very idea of anything being ‘post-truth’ seems absurd to me. You …
  • @person said: It isn't just the Trumpers, who are so brazenly intentional about it, we all fall victim to it these days. I suspect it wasn’t any different 150 years ago though, the thing that has really changed is that the rate and range …
  • @person said: In general I'm not a fan of the "post truth" world we are living in. I think reality is more than what we collectively say it is. Are we living in a post-truth world? I view the post-truth movement as something that is empow…
  • I think we are touching on a few of the real highlights here... death, impermanence, mindfulness, emptiness. I’ve tried meditating on all of them, and they have all helped to a degree. The four foundations of mindfulness stands out as a memorable…
  • They’re quite scary... but then I’ve had a thing for wasps ever since a classmate of mine trod in a wasps nest underground while we were walking in the woods and we had to run to avoid the swarm. He got severely stung.
  • @adamcrossley said: @lobster said: ascetic living focuses the mind Yes, I agree with this personally. But in my question, I’m thinking more of the ‘karma relationship’ side of the path. Can Right Livelihood be profitab…
  • @lobster said: For me it would be the Mahayana dictum Emptiness is form and form is emptiness. I read the thread, it’s very interesting... I get the feeling I never penetrated very far into the meaning of the saying before, beyond …
  • It would certainly be against the Vinaya, the rules for monks and nuns, for them to own more than the basic things it prescribes. But for lay people there is no such restriction. I’ve not come across much about it in the sutra’s. It does put me i…
  • Zen people tend to be quite sturdy, it is a path that seems to suit those who are not too much in their heads. I had a look through past forum discussions about zazen, and the search function doesn’t bring that much forward. As I understand it fr…
    in Zazen Comment by Kerome March 4
  • Well, I think I shall continue my search. Alltogether just a few too many flaws.
  • Well, the word nirvana originally meant “blown out, extinguished”, and I have read references to the Buddha saying about it that it is the final extinguishment of desire. Now samsara is characterised by the Three Poisons, desire, aversion and ign…