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Snakeskin Veteran

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Snakeskin
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  • @Jason said: @Snakeskin said: @Jason said: I also think one danger arising from such a realization is ... If it leads to renunciation, to freedom from ill-will and to harmlessness, then it's r…
  • @Jason said: I also think one danger arising from such a realization is ... If it leads to renunciation, to freedom from ill-will and to harmlessness, then it's right view. If it doesn't, it's not.
  • @Jason, I think in characterizing that way he argues for a genuine shift in priorities, the kind that comes with terminal illness.
  • "He believes that accepting that our civilisation is doomed could make humanity rather like an individual who recognises he is terminally ill." "And while this discourse was being spoken, there arose in the Venerable Kondanna the dust-free, stain…
  • @adamcrossley said: Can anyone bring in other Buddhist writings to add to the conversation? The Visuddhimagga’s method of developing a “boundless heart” uses one’s own desire for welfare as a starting point, then systematically recognizes…
  • Spirituality is metaphysical, beyond the physical. It is that which can't be touched with the hand yet is experienced. The activity of the brain can be observed, because it's physical. But the observable activity is only one dimension of that realit…
  • Awareness is a natural human faculty. To develop it is a very Buddhist thing to do. That awareness is a mind activity, a becoming, conditioned, impermanent, unsatisfactory and not self, that any identification with it or attachment to it inevitably …
  • @FoibleFull said: Buddhism tells us that our search for "imperturbability, tranquility, and harmony," is just as much of a trap as our desire to get away from pain. In MN 106 the Buddha describes their development more as a means to an en…
  • The teachings of the Buddha are multifaceted. He tailored them to different people at different stages of spiritual development and levels of commitment. Most teachings he directed to mendicants, while others to lay practitioners. Even in those clas…
  • @WesternBuddhism said: Hello, how can I incorporate achieving things in the world- e.g. money, sporting, as well as enjoying these things fully without attachment while practicing Buddhism? Awareness + mindfulness + time. If, every day, …
  • I won’t speak for the rest of the Western World, but for the U.S., at a broader cultural level, I agree with him. As a society, the U.S. doesn’t value personal qualities of “imperturbability, tranquility, and harmony.” Those can’t compete with other…
  • @Kerome said: You could argue it is harmless, but in a way it is filling the mind with dreams, and worse, dreams that could demand obedience... I see it like so: Magical thinking is a dream within a dream. Realism is a dream within a drea…
  • “And how does a monk remain focused on the mind in & of itself? There is the case where a monk, when the mind has passion, discerns that the mind has passion. When the mind is without passion, he discerns that the mind is without passion. When t…
  • I find magical thinking useful for manipulating mental states. But you gotta know how to bluff. And just like poker, "You gotta know when to hold 'em. Know when to fold 'em. Know when to walk away, when the dealing's done." I'm into quoting songs to…
  • Where there's physical or mental pain, I think hope is an expression of goodwill and compassion. As @David noted, it can be a skillful desire, depending on its object, worldly or spiritual. Absent desire and hope, there's really no impetus toward sp…
  • I think something is getting lost in translation. I think mano in this context doesn't mean thoughts or even mind, per say, but heart, or mind in the sense of, say, a mind of loving-kindness. Such a mind/heart preceeds and colors all experience. Its…
  • I respect that the synthesis of evolutionary biology and Buddhist philosophy and meditation practices constitutes a new branch of Buddhism. Personally, though, I find no need to remold the Dhamma. It already accounts for evolutionary biology in term…
  • @seeker242 said: There are other suttas, forget which right now, that describe how to handle them if they don't just subside. MN 20 and MN 2 are two of them. The latter outlines seven instances of wise and unwise attention relative to dif…
  • Maybe its not useful to think such thoughts but for a moment help me to ponder how suffering all started. As @person pointed out, the Buddha, in the Assu sutta, says “this samsara is without discoverable beginning. A first point is not disce…
  • Such a claim is unverifiable. Hence, in the recollection of the Dhamma, it's said "come and see" (ehipassiko). The Dhamma is well expounded by the Blessed One, directly visible, immediate, inviting one to come and see, worthy of applicat…
  • @nubuddh4 said: Are humans more able to achieve Nirvana than any other life form, From the perspective of the Pali discourses, yes, humans have a balance of pleasure and pain conducive to the development of virtue and wisdom. can he…
  • The brain's magic uses not only misdirection and slight of hand but real-time, revisionist history too. Perception as a mirage is more a reality than a simile. This 16 minute video dissects some of the brain's visual and temporal tricks. If the b…
  • (5) Aggregate of consciousness: “Consciousnesses” are phenomena of awareness that arise in association with sensation, perception, volition, etc. There is no such thing as “consciousness itself.” Each consciousness arises due to and associated with …
  • @person, I’m just versed enough to misrepresent Theravaden perspectives. I'd agree with a "lack of free will" in that I think the concept of free will should be set aside for that of conditioned will. Volition and, I think, the sense of self, goes …
  • Contemplating the body according to reality contradicts the notions that it is or belongs to the I. Some of it, like movement or respiration, appears subject to direct control, but otherwise happens and stops independent of the I. Other aspects, lik…
  • @FoibleFull, I have a different take on the meanings of the words. I think the first (being aware without judgment) is mindfulness. In one sense “being aware without judgment” is a redundant way of saying “being aware”. Awareness doesn…
  • Personally, if I could nip a process like the example in the bud, I would. If it's stronger than that, I say it should be contemplatively observed with the intent of renunciation. Herein, monks, when sense-desire is present, a monk knows, "The…
  • As a beginner, I found the technique of labeling conducive to developing awareness of direct experience. * Thinking * Seeing * Hearing * Feeling * Smelling * Tasting The labels were verbal commands directing attention and awareness. Th…
  • Another is to watch phenomena, their causes and conditions, their coming and going.
  • I don't know those books, but the title reminded me of Richard Bach.
  • @adamcrossley, I correct it. I figure it's Buddhist to abandon hinderences in the mind and the body. So, slouching would be a physical manifestation of dullness, too rigid, agitation. Correcting posture then becomes abandoning the respective hindere…
  • A while back, @Carlita, posted a link to Sutta Readings. They host an audio version of one my favorites: MN 20 - The Removal of Distracting Thoughts. I like to passively listen to it, echoing the words in my head as they’re spoken. You could try tha…
    in Guilt Comment by Snakeskin March 18
  • You’ve established awareness of these activities. The refocusing on self is one of them. Awareness of it doesn’t conflict with the practice. Its development is pivotal to that of discernment. Discernment requires awareness. I find the concept of …
  • You recently posted about a "visceral" response to a Syrian poet. I don't know if your dreams are connected.
  • I found a Wikipedia entry for Adi Shankara. He was an 8th century Indian philosopher credited with synthesizing currents of thought in Hinduism. The wiki says 'He also explained the key difference between Hinduism and Buddhism, stating that Hinduism…
    in Anatta Comment by Snakeskin March 17
  • @seeker242, maybe not so certainly. The highest, most wise zen master might be pained knowing the consequences of taking what isn't given just as equanimously as enjoying a cup of tea. If that behavior were correctable, he might, out of compassion, …
  • @person said: To sort of paraphrase the conclusion from the article, being regularly reminded of death leads less to an impending sense of dread and more to an appreciation that you are alive now and how precious that time is. In meditati…
    in WeCroak Comment by Snakeskin March 17
  • @Kerome said: But is it even possible to enjoy things without becoming attached? Perhaps it is better to be able to easily let go than it is to become attached in the first place? I believe it is possible to experience enjoyment with equa…
  • My verbal thoughts are like powerful rivers. It’s easy to drown. To extricate myself I sometimes transpose them into visual thoughts. I see them as a clear, mountain stream, sprinkled with sunlight. I scoop individual words, like fish, hold them up …
  • @lobster said: What is your sitting niggle and cure? Starting out, I worried about my knees. A stretching routine alleviated those concerns. Turns out the real niggle is cured by a little dehydration.
  • AI Buddha sounds like cheating, but technically it's not.
  • @Carameltail said: You are not your thoughts and/or feelings. Well put. Well... I'd add "or the observer" to things you're not.
  • You're a scholar, @Jason. Thanks for that. I'll have to reread many times.
  • @karasti, you seem to be in a rather anarchistic mood today.
  • I stay with the classics. * Keeping in mind and clearly knowing the body in itself and/or its impermant, unsatisfactory or impersonal nature. * ‎Keeping in mind and clearly knowing feelings in themselves and/or their impermant, unsatisfactory …
  • His last sentence that "wealth should serve humanity, and not the other way around" reminds me of market fundamentalism. Capitalism excels at wealth creation, but elevating free market principals to sacred status sacrifices the human needs the marke…
  • What began as protest has escalated into genocide. We'll see in the long run if "the pen is mightier than the sword."
  • I know what you mean. I watched a documentary that followed a family of five in Seria. The youngest was a little girl. They lived in one of the besieged, urban areas, where her father fought against the regime. One day, before dying in combat, he go…