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SE25Wall Explorer

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SE25Wall
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  • i do think that buddhism can quickly get cult like (like all religions), where before you know what you spend all day trying to control thoughts, feelings, and obsessing about fitting experience into the teaching. that is why i am a bad buddhist.
  • i try to enjoy my happy feelings as much as they stick around. i love feeling whole and i enjoy my memories, too. the key is to not try and keep hold of it and just be with the good feelings. what on earth would be the point of life to just have …
  • my drug days are decades behind me. i don't even drink these days. but i do believe that if everyone in the world took MDMA once, just once, the world would be a better place.
  • imagine the drop in the crime rate if drugs were legalised.
  • @Kerome said: @federica said: @David said: Every time a subject like this comes up it gets ruined for the 5th precept. Gods forbid we talk about the 1st though, eh? The first one covers all th…
  • also, with the idea of clinging to nothing, that implies that there is a clinger there clinging - lol. which leads a little onto the doctrine of no self (and all its controversies). how can i truly let go of attachments when it can be rationally arg…
  • @Kerome said: @SE25Wall said: nowt wrong with feelings. if they are generated by excessive clinging then they can lead to suffering. when Millwall win a game i feel such joy and i love being attached to that feeling. but …
  • they can also provide occasional, beautiful, personal journeys that stick with the user for a life time. they are always present throughout human history and always will be. sure, there are exceptions of terrible experiences, but by their nature (ex…
  • This is why i don't follow buddhism as if it was some profound word of god or the universe. psychedelics have, overall, been great for mankind and i don't really care what the buddha said about them. and i don't think he'd care that i didn't care…
  • nowt wrong with feelings. if they are generated by excessive clinging then they can lead to suffering. when Millwall win a game i feel such joy and i love being attached to that feeling. but i know it's impermanent so i can let it occur naturally…
  • this society, this culture, the western world, is almost unsustainable without some sort of instant relief - be it LSD, coffee, or herion. look around, who wouldn't want to escape now and then? its probably why this society functions reasonably well…
  • i very much enjoyed all my experiences as a young adult on psychedelics (the half dozen or so times we could get hold of them). they are ruthless and powerful and i wouldn't go near them now, now i have learnt in proceeding decades how fragile my mi…
  • i have only just started to realise how the word "must" permeates so much of my thinking, often accompanied by a dull aching knot in the stomach. i think if a teacher laid a lot of other "musts" on me, that dull aching feeling would grow.
  • @Kerome said: We can see that people are all different on the outside, it stands to reason that we are also all different and unique on the inside. So does that not mean that teachings and spiritual goals should also be different and unique? Perh…
  • remember with all troubling thoughts and emotion..."try not thinking of a white bear". it's impossible. so might as well sit and allow. you guys know the drill, anyhow
    in Feelings Comment by SE25Wall January 7
  • they is some fantastic work done by the Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (now becoming as popular for treating troubling emotion as CBT, etc) people about what to do with troubling emotions. Their general idea is accept mindfully the emotion tha…
    in Feelings Comment by SE25Wall January 7
  • there's so many paradoxes in this game, but whilst they are annoying sometimes they add so much beauty and mystery to it. even if i am trying to win a game that can never be won, my life gets better because of it. vision and wisdom gets better becau…
  • as soon as a practice gets caught up in "I am doing this right, or i am not doing that right" then in my view my self has caught up the practice, and with enough practice the self becomes illusive so it's a false economy anyway lol
  • @herbie said: @herbie said: Certainly depends on what one considers to be 'meditation'. Many different types and understandings. For me it is sometimes like coming home, sometimes like a refuge, sometimes merely a reminder ... …
  • i've been trying to train awareness onto awareness and it gets mind-bending lol
  • meditation for me is like seeing into whole other dimensions that i never knew i could see. and the more i do it, the more dimensions are revealed. sounds a bit Star Trek, but it's not, nothing really that esoteric about it, although it often feels …
  • some, times i don't think it is particularly skillful to forgive people. the greedy, sociopathic sweat shop owner, grinding starving kids into the ground for the price of a few nylon t shirts. that guy perhaps should be understood and his behavio…
  • i sometimes chant the C word when meditating. i dont really. seriously, meditation is just essential. on a simple, logical, commonsensical level, it's far better to step back and look at something rather than blindly react to it. buddhist or n…
  • that is the biggest smilie in Western Buddhist interneting
  • @Shoshin said: @SE25Wall the quote is @federica .... and not from my free will oh dear, thanks
  • there is definite "agency" or "willing" or some such shit within us, but absoloute free will, nah, i don't by it. philosophers etc, please stand up and speak
  • and yes, i have been listening to far too much Alan Watts
  • free will implies an all powerful, all controlling self that is not instead at the mercy of all the conditions that exist within and without it. a self that can draw thoughts into mind independant of all conditions.
  • @Shoshin said: ow. I am convinced that even if we only have partial free will, we can then act upon that conclusion and choose whether to follow suit or not. If your mind develops the thought "I want to have a bath" you are still at lib…
  • @person said: I don't know if this view is related, but when I am able to gain a deeper understanding of the causes and conditions leading to an individual or action I either don't feel as much anger, thus less need to forgive or the forgiveness …
  • what i have noticed since practacising for a few years is there is not really a single leap of faith i have had to make. there is no "faking it to make it". it's just following instructions. i guess this is the waterd-down piss easy form of buddhism…
  • robert wright is great, btw. it's like if a monk walks into a pub and Wright is the bloke at the bar who is curious and asks him questions. wright knows his buddhism but he asks so many simple but pertinent questions that really have helped me conne…
  • my own experience with compassion has come to the fore recently in man subtle ways. i am far more patient, i laugh at many things that used to piss me off. To experience this has been profound. if i now believe, which i kind of do, now and then, tha…
  • such fascinating responses. i wish we were all in a room together talking this. i don't know a single buddhist in my life - it can become a little isolating with all this wonderful stuff flying around my noddle!
  • i guess if you haven't got well worn neural pathways of compassion, or are unwilling to develop them, all the mindfullness and emptiness in the world wont make any difference. hence why i guess you get these very enlightened gurus acting in very bad…
  • King Tubby, of course.
  • It's already implied. It takes time for an acorn to become an Oak, but the Oak is already implied in the acorn. So in any lump of rock, floating around in space, there is implicit human intelligence - sometime, somehow, somewhere. We all go together…
  • nowt zen about sunny south norwood, lol.
  • that's my manor, just down the road in sunny south norwood.
  • @lobster said: > To put it another way, no past, no future, for now - stillness. lovely way of putting it...
  • fascinating responses, thanks guys.
  • @person said: No, I don't think anyone here or in the world actually knows the answer to that question. There are many good ideas on how to think about it though that can bring us nearer to a true understanding. I think I've come to a comp…
  • @Shoshin said: does anyone know if we have free will or not? I just checked ...sorry we are out of stock ...but you could try "Ehipassiko" confusingly catchy. even started swaying a bit.
  • i am reminded of the Happiness Trap by Russ Harris...the more we strive for this mythical, fleeting, state of "happiness", the more likely we are to get depressed and anxious. One interesting poitn he makes is that happiness defined as a feeling is …
  • I find giving up on any form of "self help" quite liberating. improving myself with myself is pretty tricky, especially as that "self" is pretty dysfunctional as standard. like someone on LSD trying to do a horrifically hard Sudoko. just calling …