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FoibleFull Veteran

About

Username
FoibleFull
Location
Canada
Joined
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109
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Member
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795
Location
Canada
Affiliation
Gelug / Tibetan
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Comments

  • You can check out this website. I have never accessed it (nor Gelek Rimpoche) since I we have a Geshe teaching in my own city. But my sister, living elsewhere, was introduced to Tibetan Buddhism by Gelek Rimpoche and was very impressed with him. …
  • In the Beginner's Class (given by a Tibetan Buddhist monk) the teacher asked what was the best way to help others. After several suggestions, the teacher told us the Buddhist answer: To attain enlightenment, and the continue to be reborn in the hu…
    in Healing Comment by FoibleFull March 31
  • The urge to have power is a natural response to the fact that life is unpredictable and uncertain. It is not an urge that can eliminate this fear about uncertainty, but just as alcoholics try to self-medicate their inner pain away, so too we seek p…
  • The experiences of meditation are not the goal. Oh, in Hindu yoga it is the goal. But not in Buddhism. In fact, Buddhist monks will tell you that if you focus too much on the meditation experiences, you will just be distracting yourself. The pur…
  • Two things I like best: One is a story Sharon Salzberg wrote about. The Dalai Lama took a tour of a Catholic monastery, observing how they made cheese and fruitcake to support the monastery. At the end of the tour, he was giving a taste of the ch…
  • There are 3 basic traditions of Buddhism: Zen, Vajrayana (Tibetan) and Theravadan. I have read the pursuing Zen without the guidance of a master/teacher is a waste of time. But since I have no Zen teacher and have not pursued Zen buddhism, I can…
  • Yes, Buddhism has gradually made me more sensitive. The practices make you more aware, so it increases all awareness and sensitivity is one of the things you will become more aware of. But you don't reason with your emotions. They are not logica…
  • Silencing the mind does not mean "non-thought". It means observing the constant ever-changing flow of thoughts without being swept away, hooked, by them. You still observe, you still have responses, but they do not control you. However, ALL actio…
  • Until enlightenment, we are all crazy. Even our teachers. ALL we need from our teacher is that they be a little further down the path than we are. I cannot speak for you, but I'm not so far down the path that I require an enlightened Buddha for m…
  • Buddhist truths are verified by our own observation, and once we begin to see them, then that starts to change our perspective.
  • I have collected things. But they come and go. When I lived in the dorm during my university years, I used to get rid of extra things at the end of the school year .. there was always someone eager to take it for free. When my boyfriend and I mov…
  • The older these monks get (and I've been with my own teacher for almost 20 years), the more relaxed and amused they get. MUST be fun.
  • What makes suffering painful is that we expect to NOT suffer. We tense up, we fight our discomfort. No, relaxing into it doesn't make it go away, but it changes how we feel it. Think of any kind of pain, and psychology says the more we resist i…
  • I practice what my teacher teaches us. He is a Tibetan Buddhist monk, born in Tibet, educate at Namgyal in Dharamshala and earned his Geshe degree. So I practice Vajrayana. Does it fit? Not exactly. I'm a Westerner, not a Tibetan. But the sys…
  • The way to learn it and understand it is through observation of what goes on inside of you. Memorizing the links DOES help you identify what your mindfulness observes, but is no substitution for being aware of it. Do your practice and wait for the…
  • I attended a lecture by (I forget which Tibetan Rimpoche) called "When Snow White Mountains Wear Black Hats". The gist of his lecture came down to this: in the spirit of Buddhist compassion, we need to protect the environment so that ALL sentient b…
  • Until you experience it first-hand, it is only an idea.
  • We all want to be happy. But the desire and the need to be happy IS the source of our unhappiness. Buddhist steps off the happiness/unhappiness merry-go-round and endeavours to just be vibrantly and fully in the moment, even when the moment is not…
  • Sometimes during a meditation I can be present in THIS moment. And sometimes, when off the meditation cushion, I can be briefly in the moment for the flash of a second .. but then some cognitive action or emotional comes along and I get swept up in…
  • As a Buddhist, we accept first-hand experience. Not belief. Talking to deceased people may be merely a trick of our mind ... unless of course they gave us some object that remained when they stopped talking with us. I think THAT might be proof. A…
  • I seem to remember some past lives ... BUT that experience might be just a trick of the mind, so I cannot take it as proof. I have no other explanation except that these are true memories .. but lack of an alternative explanation is not proof eithe…
  • I was a hippy in the last 1960's. And had been meditating since childhood (Mom had been a student of Yogananda). I tried it ALL, but nothing came close to a good meditation. And, specifically, noting about psychedelics is related to the opening u…
  • Actually, that is not what they mean. The approach to feelings is NOT to be one of apathy, but of mindful openness and relaxation ... no matter what those feelings ARE. Once you stop being so pushed-around by your feelings, you can relax into them…
  • There is no difference between the Buddha's enlightenment and what WE can achieve too. Although certainly I'm not going to reach enlightenment in THIS life ... at 69 all I can hope is that (1) I am now setting strong-enough imprints from doing my …
  • We are going to have clouds here. Still, the full moon is an excellent time to do the Guru Puja.
  • I have recurring atrial fibrillation ... often, when I sit down (or when I'm NOT sitting down), my heart thumps around in my chest here and there, strong and weak ... it is very distracting, and breathing is difficult. So I use all that as part of …
  • My mother used to play Satie (she had been a concert pianist before she retired .. in the 1930's, that you were pretty-much forced to be a housewife once you retired). She played Rachmaninoff too. But her favorites were Beethoven and Chopin. The …
  • Not all Buddhists are vegan. And not all are even vegetarian. And sometimes a vegetarian diet doesn't work for someone .. such as when the Dalai Lama's doctors told him when he grew old that he had to start eating meat. The Precepts Vows inclu…
  • Truth is not found in intellectualization. It is found in experience/awareness.
  • Now that I am almost 70, my mind is a lot like jello.
  • On the one hand, the MMPI (a psychological pen-and-paper test designed to screen out people with serious mental/emotional disorders) has several questions designed to see IF you are answering the test honestly. One of those questions is "I never li…
  • Of course you can believe in God. But understand that Buddhism focuses on what we directly experience. In fact, in many languages, there are different words for "I know ... because I saw it for myself firsthand" and "I know ... because someone tol…
  • I am 69 years old, with heart arrhythmia, so questions about aging are quite relevant to me. The more I go into mindfulness, the less I worry about it or feel fear. And the less unpleasantness bothers me (it doesn't go away ... I just am bette…
  • Buddhism is not goal-oriented. It is process-oriented. Another way of saying this is that if you are focusing on results, you aren't really doing Buddhism properly. Or perhaps .... Buddhism is about being here in THIS moment, and NOT about where …
  • I have seen this with couples. It is never easy for them. Usually it is the woman who wants children and the husband who doesn't want them. And usually the wife gives up her dream and learns to invest her interests in other things, keeping the ma…
  • Do your practices. And meditation. And remind yourself as often throughout your day as you can, to try to remain mindful. Make the 5 Precepts Vow and follow it, as best you can. You won't always be able to, but the purpose of keeping them is tha…
  • The Buddhist approach (attempted approach) is to open to our feelings, accept that they are there, and then relax into them ... while simultaneously being IN this moment. Not an intellectual exercise, but one of awareness and one that is furthered …
  • No matter what you do or don't do, guilt is the least constructive pursuit. Do what you can at home, as you can, when you can, as your teacher has taught you. Our Western life makes it difficult to find time, and feeling unwell makes it even more …
  • My teacher is an old Tibetan monk, born in Tibet, with a Geshe degree. Needless to say, Tibetan Buddhism is HEAVY on tradition and ritual. Not quite my cup of tea, but I can see how it works with cognitive-behavioral dynamics to achieve inner chan…
  • @Kerome said: But I think in colder countries where it is not easy to survive the winter without a heated home, such a tradition is unlikely to catch on, although I do think it is a beautiful one. It is open to women as well, although for both wo…
  • I do not LIKE pain. If it is not too bad, I can somewhat open to it and relax with it. I found my natural childbirth techniques worked well for giving birth. And mindfulness for some other discomforts or pain. But when pain gets TOO acute ..…
    in Pain Comment by FoibleFull October 2018
  • I think when we retire, we tend to follow whatever direction we were previously focusing on ... we just have more time to pursue it. I don't agree that people become interested in spirituality, settle into it, and then their interest decreases. …