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FoibleFull Veteran

About

Username
FoibleFull
Location
Canada
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Member
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722
Location
Canada
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Gelug / Tibetan
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Comments

  • Now that I am almost 70, my mind is a lot like jello.
  • On the one hand, the MMPI (a psychological pen-and-paper test designed to screen out people with serious mental/emotional disorders) has several questions designed to see IF you are answering the test honestly. One of those questions is "I never li…
  • Of course you can believe in God. But understand that Buddhism focuses on what we directly experience. In fact, in many languages, there are different words for "I know ... because I saw it for myself firsthand" and "I know ... because someone tol…
  • I am 69 years old, with heart arrhythmia, so questions about aging are quite relevant to me. The more I go into mindfulness, the less I worry about it or feel fear. And the less unpleasantness bothers me (it doesn't go away ... I just am bette…
  • Buddhism is not goal-oriented. It is process-oriented. Another way of saying this is that if you are focusing on results, you aren't really doing Buddhism properly. Or perhaps .... Buddhism is about being here in THIS moment, and NOT about where …
  • I have seen this with couples. It is never easy for them. Usually it is the woman who wants children and the husband who doesn't want them. And usually the wife gives up her dream and learns to invest her interests in other things, keeping the ma…
  • Do your practices. And meditation. And remind yourself as often throughout your day as you can, to try to remain mindful. Make the 5 Precepts Vow and follow it, as best you can. You won't always be able to, but the purpose of keeping them is tha…
  • The Buddhist approach (attempted approach) is to open to our feelings, accept that they are there, and then relax into them ... while simultaneously being IN this moment. Not an intellectual exercise, but one of awareness and one that is furthered …
  • No matter what you do or don't do, guilt is the least constructive pursuit. Do what you can at home, as you can, when you can, as your teacher has taught you. Our Western life makes it difficult to find time, and feeling unwell makes it even more …
  • My teacher is an old Tibetan monk, born in Tibet, with a Geshe degree. Needless to say, Tibetan Buddhism is HEAVY on tradition and ritual. Not quite my cup of tea, but I can see how it works with cognitive-behavioral dynamics to achieve inner chan…
  • @Kerome said: But I think in colder countries where it is not easy to survive the winter without a heated home, such a tradition is unlikely to catch on, although I do think it is a beautiful one. It is open to women as well, although for both wo…
  • I do not LIKE pain. If it is not too bad, I can somewhat open to it and relax with it. I found my natural childbirth techniques worked well for giving birth. And mindfulness for some other discomforts or pain. But when pain gets TOO acute ..…
    in Pain Comment by FoibleFull October 11
  • I think when we retire, we tend to follow whatever direction we were previously focusing on ... we just have more time to pursue it. I don't agree that people become interested in spirituality, settle into it, and then their interest decreases. …
  • There ARE some dharma centers that run off of donations. If you do not have money, you can donate time or food for the monk(s). Not that they keep a list ... it is done on the honor system. It you take (teachings), then you give (as you are able…
  • There is an old yogic saying, "Whatever you do will have results, even if you do not see it. This is the Law". Do what you feel impelled to do for the good of others. And know that you have sent the seed out there.
  • The ancient Hindus divided life up into four stages: First was youth and dedication to spiritual practices. Second was marrying and family and working. Third was contributing to society. And then retirement and devoting the rest of the life to s…
  • I quit drinking alcohol about 3 months after I turned legal age for it. Because it took next to nothing to start to feel high, and then it gave me dry heaves for a couple of hours. Not fun. So here I was, a young adult. Plenty of pressure. I …
  • @kando said: Sod the full lotus I say! Or even the half way lotus, I cannot understand what the twisting of legs into a pretzel has to do with anything! Theoretically, this lotus posture comes from Yoga (Hindu) philosophy. Has to do wi…
  • I have learned the most by observing my teacher when he is not sitting on the teaching platform. it is a blessing to have a teacher.
  • I am familiar with the body's decay. I am 69 and see it coming on within myself. As for lust, ah well, that is like any attachment. Just as with the Five Precepts, we practice mindfulness and relax into our urges, attachments and aversions. Th…
  • Buddhism is not about "becoming". Buddhism is about "being". And yes, most of the time we are NOT "being" .. we are running here and there distracted by thoughts, emotions, desires, aversions, the past, the future. This is why they call it Practi…
  • Buddhism has a history of shaping it to the culture it moves into, yet without losing its essence or effectiveness.
  • I always found it exciting, and for most of my youth and my adult life there was much travel and relocating. Wherever we are, our true home is inside us, and new experiences bring out freshness in our observation and insight. But for the past 24…
  • A live local qualified teacher (in ANY tradtion) is always the best. But not always available. Lacking a teacher, the BEST source I have found is a book: "Mindfulness in Plain English" by Bhante Gunaratana. The first few chapters are a most-ex…
  • My mother was a student of Paramahansa Yogananda, from the time she met him as a young woman back in 1930 until she died in 1997. Yoga is similar to, but not the same as, Buddhism (yoga is goal-oriented, while Buddhism is process-oriented.) We wer…
    in Impact! Comment by FoibleFull August 20
  • The dharma is the refuge. Worry is one of the states of the thinking mind. So step aside into mindfulness ... into that "silence between the words" that you have met through meditation, and rest in that wordless state. Open to the worry and use m…
  • How to deal with them? It is their problem. Not mine. I cannot make them let go. The only thing I can do is monitor my own internal response and relax into whatever I am experiencing. As for guilt. I regret what I have done and resolve to try…
  • I went for a 4-day drive with a friend who didn't smoke ... drove through the Rocky mountains, stopping only for necessary reasons. Took oranges (smoking depletes Vitamin C) and a pop-top water bottle. Whenever I wanted to suck on a cigarette, I s…
  • Until enlightenment, we are all living in illusion. Thinking about this is useful only if we use it to motivate us to do our Practices.
  • It is part of the traditional of Tibetan Buddhism, and my Tibetan Lama teaches it. The benefit of Tonglen is that is helps diminish our attachments and aversions and increase our tendency to feel compassion. It doesn't actually "do" anything (one …
    in Tonglen Comment by FoibleFull July 31
  • I agree with namarupa . that the Precepts are guidelines rather than rules. More than that, I have been taught that they are self-teaching tools. For example, when we have the urge to steal something, rather than stealing that object and no long…
  • As a person, first you wait to see if "likely" means there IS bone cancer. If it turns out to be so, then you grieve, you allow yourself to grieve, and you do whatever it takes to keep your dog comfortable. I have lost dear pets, and it is not any…
  • Try this site. Unless you are looking for Buddhists who don't attend a dharma group. http://www.buddhanet.info/wbd/
  • Buddhist since 2000 with a local Tibetan Lama as a teacher. And a degree in cognitive psychology. Yes, VERY useful. Some of the Tibetan practices function very much like cognitive psychology .. deliberately creating and strengthening the patter…
  • Very nice quotes. I think the most important one is that enlightenment is not a concept. We in the West are so addicted to thinking, and waste a lot of time trying to "think" Buddhism, instead of trying to experience it. When I encounter something…
  • My teacher, who is a dyed-in-the-wool Tibetan lama (actually born IN Tibet) tells us that the more we do our Practice, the more we set imprints that will propel us towards a human life where we CAN continue to practice the Dharma. Otherwise, the Ti…
  • “Everything is always changing. If you relax into this truth, that is Enlightenment. If you resist, this is samsara (suffering).” Dzongsar Jamyang Khyentse, “What Makes You (Not) a Buddhist” (the play on the title, the "Not" means that Buddhism …
  • A few sentences that stand out that I would like to comment on. I do not know if they will ring true for you or be useful: You say you are having issues with faith. OBSERVE this. Be mindful. Faith is an attachment, a seeking of “ground/securit…
  • @Kerome said: You can’t possibly be as foolish as me! Oh dear, I seem to have proved it... ego full steam ahead It's not a contest
  • The purpose of the Five Precepts Vows is as a self-teaching vow. Let's take the one about not stealing. Say you see something and you feel your desire welling up inside of you .. then automatically you reach out and take it. Okay .. the Buddhist …
  • I have a degree in Psychology (emphasis on "Learning and Behavior") and I find that Buddhism can be taken as a form of self-administered cognitive-behavioral therapy. And with educational psychology (the three types of learning: auditory, visual, …
  • It all reflects back on ourselves. No one is perfect before enlightenment, and that includes ourselves. Yet somehow our teachers are the friends of us relatively-unskilled Buddhists. The key point is how well WE handle the imperfections of othe…
  • I am always impressed by how easily the older monks laugh. But it is never the frenetic fitful laughter of someone who has not found inner peace. Their laughter is like a rippling brook sparkling in the sunlight. Ahhhhhhhh
    in Laughter Comment by FoibleFull May 29
  • Today is Sagadawa Duchen in Tibetan Buddhism. Day for the Mahayana Sojong Vows before the sun rises. Unfortunately, I was up in the morning hours last night with atrial fibrillation and missed the pre-dawn vows. Next year, perhaps. Hopefully I w…