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DairyLama Veteran

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DairyLama
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  • I have changed my user name to Dairy Lama. The last Dairy Lama died in an unfortunate accident, he got trapped in one of the freezers in Tesco - though at least he spent his final hours surrounded by the ice-cream he loved.
  • @lobster said:> It takes a very determined, perhaps strong willed person to just be single mindly mindful and undistracted. It can be done. Like most things, it gets easier with practice. Obviously you start where you are, and build up. …
  • If you're into TNH, check out "A day of Mindfulness", page 27 in "The Miracle of Mindfulness" https://terebess.hu/zen/mesterek/Thich Nhat Hanh - The Miracle of Mindfulness.pdf
  • @karasti said:> Even though moderators help direct things a bit in the forums they moderate, it's really up to the community to set their standards for what they want to see. Buddhist forums aren't democracies. You will see.
  • @CromeYellow said:> Still, though it is very easy to get distracted and follow the feeling. With some meditations you are advised to follow the feeling, to develop it, to go further.
  • @Kerome said: But I think you can go a step further. While being truly mindful you can examine the negative mind states you get into, and find their roots, which often lead to the three poisons. Looking deeply can free you to a certain extent fro…
  • Anything with Trump in it.
  • @Tosh said:> I've read somewhere that meditation doesn't really start till you start getting bored and hacked off with it. Another view is that if you get bored in meditation you're not doing it right, or at least not developing much sam…
  • @person said: My understanding is that emptiness is something that is experiential rather than some thing that has some sort of existence out in the world. Teachings on emptiness in Buddhism ( eg in the Heart Sutra ) are generally framed …
  • @Kerome said: I’m trying to get a handle on the properties that define our universe - to me that seems like truth. Impermanence and inter-being are a very good start I think, as universal principles that apply everywhere independent of perspectiv…
  • @Kerome said: Pleasant as these are, they never seem to stay for long, most lasting only a second or two. Has anyone ever sat down and tried to categorise the types of meditative bliss? Or attach a meaning to them? I must have encountered at leas…
  • @Gui said: I think that ultimate reality is before mind and though attempts to "grasp" it are futile and Absurd... Could you explain what you mean by "before mind"? And where else are we going to experience "reality", if not in the mind? I…
  • @David said: You don't want to make the place too stale. Next thing we'll have no personal support threads. Of course, it's about balance. Recently it seems that the pendulum has to swung too far in the direction of general chat and self…
  • @Snakeskin said: Kidding aside, anicca, dukkha, anatta. When one establishes the perception of impermanence, the perception of unsatisfactoriness and the perception of not-self, one establishes right view and sees ultimate truth. Sure, bu…
  • @Kerome said: Thanks for that, of course things like impermanence and annatta are important aspects of reality, and therefore ultimate truth. Really? IMO the closest thing we have to "objective truth" is science. The religious and spiri…
  • @federica said: Thanks, @SpinyNorman; Did you want to flag the comment or make a formal point, at all? My comment was really in light of your recent thread about lack of Buddhist focus on NB. As a more general observation, I am never s…
  • "Gormless" is an insult in my experience, and I don't understand why anyone would want to revive the word. An odd topic for a Buddhist discussion forum?
  • @genkaku said: the distinction between physical pain and mental anguish I have a strong hunch that meditation will show this dichotomy to be bogus. So you can't tell the difference between a persistent bodily pain, …
  • @Kerome said:> What is your thinking on ultimate truth? I'm not convinced there is such a thing, though IMO a search for personal truth is worthwhile. I find the word "ultimate" rather puzzling, for example when people talk about "ultim…
  • @Carlita said: Was thinking. Anyone can do breathing meditation and practice mindfulness. A step further is actively observing And seeing everyday occurances and experiences as a result of one's own karma. Isn't that an aspect of mindfuln…
  • @karasti said: You guys and gals have way too much faith in me Perhaps, but I'm not sure I would recommend anyone else here.
  • @seeker242 said: Not necessarily I don't think. For example, "craving is the cause of suffering" is still an "enlightened perspective" even if you don't actually fully believe it or fully understand it. It's readily observable in life, even if …
  • @Snakeskin said: @SpinyNorman said: @nakazcid said:> Does anyone else here experience boredom as a physical sensation, or am I an anomaly? I experience most feelings as a mix of "physical" and "me…
  • @genkaku said: Doesn't being "bored" imply, by definition, the longing for something more "interesting" or "peaceful" or "compassionate" or some other add-on feel-good sensation? Yes, I experience boredom as a sort of disatisfied restless…
  • @nakazcid said:> Does anyone else here experience boredom as a physical sensation, or am I an anomaly? I experience most feelings as a mix of "physical" and "mental".
  • I resolved some years ago not to make any further resolutions. So there.
  • @Kerome said:So perhaps a more correct phrasing would be “as I understand Buddhism” or “from my perspective as a Buddhist”, and then you quote from the sutra’s and teachers you know. Yes, that is a much better approach.
  • @Shoshin said: What does “From a ‘Buddhist’ perspective” really mean ? (to you) It could mean all sorts of things. It could mean a personal perspective informed by Buddhist practice, but not necessarily based on Buddhist teachings. It…
  • @pegembara said: @SpinyNorman said: @pegembara said: You are trying to experience the truth that all conditioned phenomena are unsatisfactory and their stilling is bliss. What exactly do you m…
  • @nakazcid said:> @SpinyNorman Funny thing is I’ve never found mantras particularly effective - for myself, anyway. I’ll try to see if I can ‘trigger’ stillness next time I sit. There are probably different ways of doing this, but for me t…
  • @Snakeskin said: Guarding the senses is the first Buddhist, contemplative practice I learned. The technique was to verbally label the sense experience as “thinking, seeing, hearing, feeling, smelling, tasting.” It didn’t require any understanding…
  • @pegembara said: You are trying to experience the truth that all conditioned phenomena are unsatisfactory and their stilling is bliss. What exactly do you mean by "all conditioned phenomena", and what exactly do you mean by their "stillin…
  • @Snakeskin said: -- MN 60 (Under the heading of “Sense restraint”) Lastly, it’s foundational to the more advanced satipatthana practice of contemplating the senses, as in this translation of the Satipatthana Sutta, under the heading "3. The Si…
  • @nakazcid said: Any thoughts or suggestions? I’ve kind of plateaued with this, and am not quite sure where to go from here. A useful short-cut I've discovered is being able to connect fairly quickly with the inner stillness beneath the mo…
  • @karasti said: I think a couple extra moderators would be good. I agree. I think you would make a good moderator here actually.
  • @seeker242 said: Sure! And also depends on how those texts are interpreted. If all life was suffering, then enlightened life would be suffering too. But of course, that can't be true. That's why I suggested talking about unenlightened e…
  • There are quite a few members here who are not exclusively Buddhist, that might partly explain the lack of focus. Though I was puzzled by some of the ambivalent comments in this thread: http://newbuddhist.com/discussion/comment/523921#Comment_52392…
  • In simple terms the four tetrads are a progression from samatha ( tranquillity ) to vipassana ( insight ). There are a number of commentaries on the four tetrads of anapanasati, this is the most comprehensive one I have found: https://www.buddha…
  • @Snakeskin said: “Look upon the world as empty, ever mindful....” This reminded me of the Sunna Sutta: "Insofar as it is empty of a self or of anything pertaining to a self: Thus it is said, Ananda, that the world is empty. And what is…
  • @Nehan said: How you can tell if a person is trying to know herself or trying to hurt herself? Whether they seem content with the situation is probably a good place to start.
  • @Kerome said:> So I started off with a bit of laughing meditation - Do you need to read a joke or something?
  • @Shoshin said: After all The Buddha did say "Ehipassiko"...See for yourselves Sure, but there are many Buddhist schools, and so there are many methods for doing that.
  • @Kerome said: Nothing whatsoever should be clung to. That's more like a result of practice, not something I would tell a beginner to "do".
  • @lobster said: Being kind to animals, for many of us extends to not eating friends. For some of us it is also about the practice of Right Intention, which includes harmlessness. And of course harmlessness is also the spirit of the five p…
  • @seeker242 said: Buddhism teaches that dissatisfaction is inherent in life, not that all life is dissatisfaction. There's a difference! It depends which texts you read: "The world in general, Kaccaayana, grasps after systems and is imp…
  • @Jeffrey said: So what is the resolution? Is it a construct of mind? Yes, it's a fabrication. That's why resolutions tend to fade over time.
  • @paulyso said: what ways can we give simple advise to those new to buddhism?i'll start.the study aspect.study and reflect.go slow.about practice. do--your best--and be.practice the art of balance or middle way to counteract of possible tendency t…