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person · Where is my mind? · Veteran

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'Merica!
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Comments

  • Before giving my 2 cents, I just want to kindly point out that the thread has slipped into anger over politics. I try to take a wider more long term view than the day to day or week to week developments in the vein that MLK talked about when he s…
  • Andrea Fella, a teacher at IMC recently gave a talk on the Atthakavagga. Anyone following along may like to give it a listen. http://www.audiodharma.org/talks/audio_player/8046.html
  • TB has a reputation for being conservative and monastic oriented, but I've never heard anyone talk about renouncing relationships for lay people or even really for monastics, there's a lot of social interaction in monasteries. Some people go on long…
  • I don't think we should look at Buddhism or meditation in the military as making better baby killers or allowing people to cope with unethical actions, but more that it helps people in those positions to make better decisions (less likely to kill ci…
  • What comes to my mind regarding cherry picking is the analogy of the finger pointing at the moon. The important thing isn't that the finger be completely accurate and pure but that it gets us to the moon. For example if you were to take a road tr…
  • This may not really be what you're asking for but Dan Harris has a secular meditation podcast and at one point he interviewed someone from the military teaching meditation alongside a scientist studying it. https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/10-…
  • @Lazy_eye said: @person said: I was relating more to the opposite notion of non-becoming. I'm someone who has the inclination to desire oblivion, like many addicts do. If I think about becoming/non-becoming in terms of af…
  • I was relating more to the opposite notion of non-becoming. I'm someone who has the inclination to desire oblivion, like many addicts do. If I think about becoming/non-becoming in terms of after death then try and relate that to our current life,…
  • That's a good distinction @Dhammika, it makes me realize that Kama in this chapter is translated as "sensual" desire and not simply desire. I think it's right to say that I desire a "higher", more spiritual form of happiness.
  • I take the examples of Gil Fronsdale and the book we're discussing and Stephen Batchelor and his writings. They are similar in how they interpret Buddhism but I think they get there in different ways. To my mind Gil looks to these earliest teachi…
  • @vinlyn said: @person said: ...but it might not be fully accurate to say that it would take 500 lifetimes. I appreciate the post. But keep in mind I said "may" take 500 lifetimes, not "would". …
  • @vinlyn said: Are they right? I don't know. But it is what they teach. Honestly I don't think they know either. But it's what the tradition teaches and in my experience Buddhists brought up in a traditional Buddhist culture usually have…
  • @upekka said: @person said: @Jeffrey said: 3 types of suffering: 1 suffering (body/mind) 2 change which involves losing (or fearing) the things that delight us 3 pervasive that comes from confusion …
  • Time for some new chapters yet?
  • I attend teachings one night a week at a Tibetan temple and then just recently I started going to a western Theravada center for some group meditation practice. Meditation isn't really an important part of the Tibetan Gelug sect, they focus more …
  • Other people along with self reflection seem to do the job. I have the predilection towards being a hermit, I would love to live alone in a cabin in the woods. Navigating others, trying to find the best words to help, being humbled by their knowledg…
  • Is it actually called Buddhist Lent or is that just what it is similar to?
  • @karasti said: Many people who eat excessively don't do so out of greed, but because their bodies aren't functioning correctly to tell them when to stop eating. Just sayin'. Other people are overweight and even obese and they aren't over eating. …
  • There's no prize for abandoning all the stuff, so I give up and let go of what I can. I have the freedom in my life to be able to eat only rich, tasty food if I want but doing so not only leads to poor health but regularly having them causes my crav…
  • I second both answers
  • @Jeffrey said: 3 types of suffering: 1 suffering (body/mind) 2 change which involves losing (or fearing) the things that delight us 3 pervasive that comes from confusion Good point to bring up, the way number 2 was taught in the same teac…
  • At the teachings I attended tonight the question was asked how we should relate to the pleasant things we experience while seeking a mind of renunciation. The answer was to try not to attach strongly to them and to realize that the happiness they br…
  • I think practically speaking for us lay practitioners, managing our cravings so they don't go crazy and start controlling us is a good goal and the way I live my life. In general though I don't want to deny any deeper meaning or intention in the …
  • All the known laws of physics work equally well backwards as they do forward. Except for one notable exception, entropy. At any rate, it's a nice notion. Maybe when people have the experience of a being made of light and love, they are having…
  • @karasti said: I think attempting to kill off all pleasurable sensations would leave life pretty flat. I don't know if you've seen or read The Giver. That's the way removing emotion and desire is portrayed. My understanding of removing…
  • @lobster said: Crass indulgence, like a jar of razor honeys is no better than sensual asceticism. Maybe, I see it like we don't notice the razor so much when we have just one piece of cake, but by the third or fourth it becomes more notic…
  • I took notice of the idea that these poems were sung (p31). Then today listening to Ajahn Brahm he made a point that chanting and rituals weren't a part of early Buddhism, that meditation was emphasized. I tend to find Gil Fronsdale more reliable…
  • Sensual desire is a major obstacle and challenge for me. I've been able to get some control of it by purposefully letting it out from time to time so it knows it will get some time later. Doing that I really notice the meaning of the second stanz…
  • I listen to his teachings on podcast and overall I enjoy and appreciate them. He has a very relaxed and open attitude, very accepting of people. I don't always agree with him though and think he isn't necessarily always right in his views but it doe…
  • @DhammaDragon said: Fronsdal's interpretation of the sutta is as if this was the first draft of the doctrine of the Buddha. The Buddha became enlightened, and this was a first attempt to put into words the insights he gained. Yes, it …
  • I second @karasti's idea of breaking down the threads by concepts rather than chapters.
  • A couple items that jumped out for me reading the introduction were: 1) That a common refutation of these passages as teachings is that they aren't instructions as much as they are a description of how an enlightened person views the world. So fa…
  • I like the distinction between Confucian and Taoist principles you bring up @DhammaDragon. In the back of my mind somewhere I remember someone championing the ideas of Confucianism over mindfulness, I wonder if this is the same guy. From a self…
  • My take was that he was talking about the way some mindfulness meditation programs without the Buddhist philosophy backing them up fall into the trap of only being about acceptance. For those of us with a background in Buddhism, adoption of ethic…
  • I've heard it said that living in a monastery is like being alone, together. So the path is inward and individual but also we support each other on our path.
  • Nice resource. There are a lot of full books there, among them at the bottom are both of Stephen Batchelor's books, as well as lots of other notable Buddhist authors.
  • @karasti said: So when arrives at a conclusion they don't believe in rebirth, do you just let the question go completely, @person and @Kerome? With all the information available with the internet I found it necessary to adopt an attitude …
  • @Kerome said: @lobster said: Rebirth proven yet? Not to my satisfaction ... or even interest ... https://www.reddit.com/r/Buddhism/comments/48dijw/what_in_your_opinion_is_the_best_argument_for/ An interesting disc…
  • @Dubitator314 said: @karasti said: But what are you looking for, exactly? I guess I am unclear on your question I just wanted to know how the Buddhists who appeal to Dr. Stevenson's research reconcile what he says abou…
  • @Dubitator314 said: @person said: To answer your question directly, I haven't heard any explanation that I can remember. They say it is possible to remember many past lives though so a memory of one wouldn't have to be limited to ju…
  • Good question. I haven't looked into it in detail but apparently there are stories of memories of past lives that can be verified and not easily explained through more mundane reasons. In the spirit of scientific skepticism though I wonder if aside …
  • @Dakini said: This issue of not recognizing ordinations for women seems to pertain mainly to Thailand or to Theravada Buddhism? Except there was an example of a nun who was ordained in Sri Lanka, and attained a leadership role there, with public …
  • I haven't gotten to it yet but in the introduction Fronsdale mentions that the name of the chapter is the Kama Sutta. It is the opposite take on pleasure to the Sanskrit Kama Sutra.
  • I feel this book has come along at a time that I really needed something like this. I've been in the Tibetan tradition mainly for on and off 20 years, but I've come to realize that while I embraced the philosophy my actual practice has never really …
  • As I'm reading I'm jotting down a few points that I'd like to discuss along with the page number so I don't forget.
  • @Dakini said: @DhammaDragon said: As soon as everyone gets the book, we will begin a separate thread for the introduction and the sixteen different chapters, then 🐉🙏👍 Well, what about comments that tie chapters togethe…
  • I think it would be good to have a separate thread for each chapter. That will make it easier for people to jump into a discussion if they're reading it later.