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Carlita · Bastian please! Save us! · Veteran

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Carlita
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  • Re: Throw out the teachings of the Buddha

    The Dharma> @JaySon said:

    Dear Friend,

    Throw out all the teachings of the Buddha, all concepts, ideas, signs, and notions.

    The teaching are just tools. They aren't ultimate truth. Use them to build the door to ultimate reality then put them back in the toolbox.

    Sincerely,

    Your pal, The Diamond Sutra

    Its a combination. The raft, you have the person (buddha), the ores (dharma), and sangha (neighbors floating around you). To push the raft, you need owes. To have the map (instructions for practice), you need the sangha (a teacher). But these things wont help unless you pick up and use the ores and read the map yourself. No dictations. No "training ores" just you. Just you.

    Three jewels rather than one. Its a balance without attachment.

    Snakeskin
  • Morning Sutta: this caught my attention

    At Savatthi. Then, early in the morning, Upacala the nun put on her robes and, taking her bowl & outer robe, went into Savatthi for alms. When she had gone for alms in Savatthi and had returned from her alms round, after her meal she went to the Grove of the Blind to spend the day. Having gone deep into the Grove of the Blind, she sat down at the foot of a tree for the day's abiding.

    Then Mara the Evil One, wanting to arouse fear, horripilation, & terror in her, wanting to make her fall away from concentration, approached her & said, "Where do you want to reappear,[1] nun?"

    "I don't want to reappear anywhere, my friend."

    [Mara:]
    The devas of the Thirty-three,
    the Hours, the Contented,
    those who delight in creation,
    & those in control:
    direct your mind there
    and it will enjoy
    delight.

    [Sister Upacala:]
    The devas of the Thirty-three,
    the Hours, the Contented,
    those who delight in creation,
    & those in control:
    they are bound
    with the bonds of sensuality;
    they come again
    under Mara's sway.
    The whole world is burning.
    The whole world is aflame.
    The whole world is blazing.
    The whole world is provoked.
    The Unprovoked, Unblazing
    — that people run-of-the-mill
    don't partake,
    where Mara's
    never been —
    that's where my heart
    truly delights.
    Then Mara the Evil One — sad & dejected at realizing, "Upacala the nun knows me" — vanished right there.

    Upacala Sutta: Sister Upacala
    https://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/sn/sn05/sn05.007.than.html

    federicaSnakeskinDavidlobster
  • Re: Moments of bliss in meditation

    @Kerome said:
    Pleasant as these are, they never seem to stay for long, most lasting only a second or two. Has anyone ever sat down and tried to categorise the types of meditative bliss? Or attach a meaning to them? I must have encountered at least four or five, from a strong sexual orgasm to a momentary bath of light airy bliss welling up from underneath.

    I get the definite impression there is more going on when I meet these things, that I’m not properly understanding their origins.

    I listen to meditive music chanting to slow me down into meditation mood. Then mind ks calm, I do more chanting. After the second chant/half song of Vajsattva buddha, I do guided meditation on lam rim. During which I have some experiences. Then I sit quietly for ten mins tops. Thats when I experience things. I find out more about rebirth. I put together why this happens and that. Insight meditation. I listen to calming music. Then I get my pen, paper, and suttas and start putting names to feelings. Feelings are more "aha!" Moments. I write what I learned in meditation like dreams I forget easily. Then I do a lpt of postrations. I run with it until the feeling is all through my body. An hour meditation.

    Some bliss but mostly insight to aha-knowledge I wouldnt have thought otherwise by studying. One way to label is to write down in paragragh physical feelings. Anything. Doesnt have to be buddistic. Once you done meditating grab your sutta or sutra book you have on hand. Link your feelings to different discources of The Buddha. Maybe you'll find a good explanation that way. Other than that, I learn best by subject meditation. Breathing calms me but doesnt do the hard work.

    Long reply but not in a good mood now. Hope this helps.

    lobster
  • Re: how to simplify buddhism for beginners and advance participants

    @SpinyNorman said:

    @Carlita said:
    Was thinking. Anyone can do breathing meditation and practice mindfulness. A step further is actively observing And seeing everyday occurances and experiences as a result of one's own karma.

    Isn't that an aspect of mindfulness? Noticing cause and effect, how things arise?

    I guess so. I seperated breathing as calming for insight. Mindfulness, awareness of what comes and goes. Insight, the subject(s) one things of and applies during meditation. So, you find yourself calm. You gather all you oberved or mindful of the day. Find what relates in The Dhamma and meditate on whatever subject(s) appropiate to improve things we may feel uncomfortable to delve into beyond breathing and awareness.

    I find it useful but with most traditions that point one needs a teacher. So, it depends.

    lobster
  • Re: how to simplify buddhism for beginners and advance participants

    Was thinking. Anyone can do breathing meditation and practice mindfulness. A step further is actively observing And seeing everyday occurances and experiences as a resukt of one's own karma. Then, for every action worth looking into try finding patterns that may have lead to that result. The Buddha I read earlier answers a king who said since we are subject to aging and death why and how donwe practice The Dhamma. The Buddha says simply act with wholesome merit and virtuous deeds. Instead of just focusing on theology, reading the suttas to apply vertureous deeds is a plus.

    paulyso