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Dakini Veteran

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Dakini
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  • Re: Was Buddha an anti-magician?

    @lobster said:

    @Dakini said:
    Was he an anti-magician? Is this a serious question? Of course he was; he preached against soothsaying and casting spells. Those things do nothing to advance one's practice. They're not about cultivating mindfulness, egolessness, and compassion--the Dharma.

    Tee hee. <3
    Dakas and dakinis are un-buddhists? The awakened and awakening use the magic they find. For example the benefits of mantrayana are skilful. Possesion by embodiments of principles have deep impact on those doing deity practice.

    However being an egoic, uncultivated anti-muggle I iz probably all wrong and de-skilled ... again ... :3

    haha, well, mantrayana is basically Hindu, and those Hindus in many respects knew how to induce altered states of consciousness of various sorts. They knew what worked. Then some Buddhists took that and added a Buddhist twist to it, so that it becomes skillful means for developing compassion or whatever. I guess.

    (Did I just contradict my earlier statement? Now look what you made me do! )

    lobster
  • Re: I really, really love it when....

    @karasti said:
    Low-carb cheesecake turns out better than you expected :lol:

    I've never heard of this! Where do you get it?
    If you stop and think about it, the main thing about cheesecake is the cream cheese, and the sour cream topping; it's all cream and a bit of protein. The only carbs are whatever sugar you add to the cream cheese, and then the graham cracker crust. Take away the crust and you still have the yummy cheesy/creamy part.

    Oops. Didn't mean to hijack the flow of the topic. :blush: Pardon my cheesecake enthusiasm.

    Bunkslobster
  • Re: Fake Science

    Of course, this is very worrisome and dismaying. But corporate interests have been taking over many paths of influence over the generations. I remember seeing a documentary on how the auto, petroleum and highway industries influenced public opinion back in the 40's or 50s by staging a huge exhibit at a World's Fair, to demonstrate how cars were America's future and the path to modernity. Public transit was shown to be old-fashioned and backwards. Cities of the future would have networks of freeways whisking people from the suburbs to downtown for work and leisure.

    This trifecta of interests then proceeded to buy up transit companies in major cities around the country, removing overhead electric-trolley lines and light rail tracks, replacing all that with gas-guzzling buses on limited schedules, to force people to buy cars. They eliminated Los Angeles' bus system altogether. They tore out light-rail commuter train tracks on the east side of San Francisco Bay, serving people who worked in SF. They were later sued in federal court for all the damage they'd done, but received only a slap on the wrist, and weren't required to replace any of the services they'd eliminated.

    I don't know if such an outrage could have been perpetrated on the public in Europe. I have the impression the corporations have a stronger stranglehold on life in the US.

    The university I attended in the Pacific Northwest had a leading School of Forestry. When my uncle got his degree there, they taught that clear-cutting was extremely damaging, and should be avoided at all costs, and taught techniques for culling some trees while leaving neighboring trees standing, so that the forest could easily regenerate.

    By the 1980's, one of the big timber companies in the state had taken over the School of Forestry, "buying" it with huge donations. Suddenly, the curriculum changed radically, and clear-cutting was seen not only as ok, but a rationale was found to justify this as "healthy" for wildlife!

    And it's become painfully clear in recent years the extent to which corporations have been striving to hoodwink the American public into believing that global warming/climate change is not caused by human activity.

    Perhaps re-regulation, rather than de-regulation of industry, should be implemented, if it's not already too late to take back our government from these destructive interests.

    TiggerKeromeFosdick
  • Re: Mindful Self-Compassion...sort of

    @yagr said:

    @Dakini said:
    I think Sherman Alexie should base a character in one of his novels on @yagr. There's some great coyote material there, and lots of food for thought about Life. That is one movie I'd really enjoy seeing. :) :)

    Thanx for sharing your stories, OP.

    Ironically, Sherman Alexie is my wife's cousin.

    Then he's missed some good material, right under his nose. Let us know when the movie comes out. ;) You've already got a fan base.

    yagr
  • Re: Mindful Self-Compassion...sort of

    I think Sherman Alexie should base a character in one of his novels on @yagr. There's some great coyote material there, and lots of food for thought about Life. That is one movie I'd really enjoy seeing. :) :)

    Thanx for sharing your stories, OP.

    yagr