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Fosdick · in its eye are mirrored far off mountains · Veteran

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Fosdick
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Alaska, USA
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  • Re: The Tao of Treebark

    @lobster

    And Vajrapani is wrathful, in an unbridled, energetic way, deeply, powerfully wrathful, with all the non-conceptual wrath that is needed to bust through the mess of a human being’s problems. This wrath, however, should not be confused with karmic anger, with loss of control, or the inability to be peaceful and kind. It is a noble, stable, understanding wrath, an energy that needs no target, that needs not consume itself, but is just pure presence — boundless potential ready to be unleashed, without restrictions as to the enlightened form it might take.

    This is quite fascinating to me, and I intend to sit with it for a while. I have felt a whift of this wrathful quality on occasion, but did not quite know how to regard it or where to go with it. Feels a bit like anger, a bit like iron determination, a bit like something else. Many thanks for the link. Maybe I will carve this Vajrapani onto a stick, if the right one ever appears.

    lobster
  • Re: Zen Master: "If you want to practice Zen, find a teacher. Stop making excuses. A student that cannot

    I met Katagiri roshi and, once I met him that was it.

    I met Katagiri roshi also, a long time ago. Heard him give a talk, and exchanged a few words with him. I still regard him as my master, though I never saw him again.

    To have a teacher may not always mean what we think that it does.

    karastiShoshinlobster
  • Re: Swim into the deepness of your mind?

    I used to use a similar visualization of sinking down, down, down into the deep water until I would come to rest on the bottom, where all was silent, all was dark. I could see the light receding as I descended, but never tried to visualize any waves or disturbances of the surface - didn't need to, for I was drowning in those waves in "reality" and had no need to imagine them.

    There was no swimming or struggling going on either, I simply would relax and allow myself to sink. The most effective visualizations are the simplest ones, in my experience.

    eggsaviorherberto
  • Re: Coffee ???

    Interesting stuff, coffee. I normally have a large cup in the morning in lieu of breakfast, and it helps to wake me up and to comfort me after the ordeal of having to fight my way out from under a pile of dogs in the morning.

    In the evening, if I am very tired, a cup o' joe actually relaxes me and enables me to sleep in spite of the dogs. A dual purpose food. Very useful.

    Long ago, I used to guzzle coffee all day long, but over the years I seem to have lost the urge to do so. Drink mostly water now, perhaps with a dab of sweetening.

    HozanBunks
  • Re: Animal friends

    @lobster said

    In Buddhism the animal realm is below that of humans

    I know that is the orthodox view, but where does this "above" and "below" stuff come from? Is that not dualistic thinking, one of those things of which we are encouraged to rid ourselves?

    Perhaps only humans can be awakened because only humans are asleep in the first place. >:)

    Do we leave behind our animal self, our body, our karma, our dukkha?

    Yes. And then eternity begins to seem so damned boring that we thirst for rebirth - and it is so! >:) >:)

    eggsavior