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Kerome · Love, love is mystery · Veteran

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Kerome
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The Continent
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  • Re: Don’t Cry For Me (poem)

    A nice poem Lee82, very expressive.

    Lee82
  • Re: What is spirituality, anyway?

    Whether you include the psyche or not is rather a key question, after all nearly everything we do starts in the mind. So if you do include the psyche, and I do, then such things as finding a new life direction fall under spirituality.

    Learning the inner nature of the mind is all very well, but I feel one should not become too attached to goal-oriented modes of searching. That is the mind doing it’s thing, and if your goal is just for the mind to know the mind, then you are likely moving towards a dead end.

    Shoshin
  • Re: Wild Wild Country

    I came across this Medium post by Dickon Kent, who lived as a teenager at Rajneeshpuram and hosted a Reddit Ask-Me-Anything about his time there to fill in some of the gaps in the documentary

    https://medium.com/@dickonkent/what-wild-wild-country-didn-t-say-57-questions-answered-by-a-teenage-rajneeshpuram-resident-a1d32821a5f8

    person
  • What is spirituality, anyway?

    It seems to me this is quite a legitimate question to ask. I’ve read and listened to a lot of material by mostly modern teachers, and it seems there is a lot of talk of meditation, mindfulness, insight and what happens after death. But these things seem to a certain extent normal, ordinary things.

    The dictionary defines it as “the quality of being concerned with the human spirit or soul as opposed to physical or material things”, which kind of defines it in opposition to materialism. However Buddhism holds that there is no such thing as a soul, yet as a movement it is held to be highly spiritual.

    It seems to me the New Age defines spirituality more in terms of whether you believe in crystals and incense and yoga, rather than anything to do with the human spirit? I was wondering how people think about it.

    Snakeskin
  • Re: Non attachment/ Disidentification

    @WesternBuddhism said:
    Eckhart Tolle calls it disidentification with the mind/ Ego and Buddhists call it Non-Attachment to things, but is it best not to try and do these and just become aware instead? As in trying to do these more mind activity is created as a result.

    I don’t think those two approaches... Eckhart Tolle’s disidentification with the mind and Buddhism’s non-attachment to things... are exactly identical. Non-attachment happens inside the mind, although it eventually leads to disidentification.

    As I understand it both Eckhart’s spirituality and Buddhism are a shortcut on the path of awareness. Yes, you can choose to “just try and become aware”, but in doing so you are replicating work that has already been done in ancient times by the Buddha. It is useful to try and understand what you are trying to do through listening to the teachings.

    The Buddha’s path is a path of gradual awakening, where sila and insight meditation leads to eventual direct experience of the mind. Dharma teachings condition the mind, practice eventually loosens the mind’s grip on awareness.

    WesternBuddhismFosdickSnakeskin