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Kerome · Love, love is mystery · Veteran

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Kerome
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The Continent
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  • Re: The sense of touch and meditation

    The thing that bothers me is that if Buddhist scripture just blindly accepted 5 senses plus the mind as sixth, what does that imply about the thoroughness of the investigation of the structures of mind? Or lists such as the skandhas? The senses are relatively easy to investigate, yet no-one in the community of monks choose to correct the lore.

    Meditation and the senses

    It does concern me a little...

    Snakeskinperson
  • Re: The sense of touch and meditation

    Well, according to the article I quoted if you look at the sense of balance, it has its own mechanism in the ears and it’s own pathways in the brain. It is even called “your sense of balance”, using the same word. These are unique inputs to the mind and it is hard to qualify it as a “sub class” of one of the other senses.

    And a good morning to you :) I’m just having my first coffee...

    Snakeskin
  • Re: The sense of touch and meditation

    Yes, by all means hone the senses. But I think most people aren’t even aware of most of the senses that the body provides. I once did a course at an Anthroposophical society on the senses, and there they listed 14, including the sense of temperature and the sense of kinesthetics (the relative position of your joints), and they said they were discussing the virtue of including another three.

    The Buddhist lore talks about the five classical senses - sight, sound, touch, taste and smell - and even lists them as having separate “sense doors”. But there are stories in the medical literature of people experiencing sinesthesia, the blending of the senses.

    During meditation on the breath though, ones awareness tends to be focussed on the sensation of breath in the body in various places, a very light, rhythmic sensation. So I find it interesting to be drawn to the touch.

    Snakeskin
  • Re: They are building a temple

    If they are going to talk about the Lam Rim there will certainly be some reading to be done. Great news @Carlita that you’ll have a temple near you soon.

    Carlita
  • Re: Was the Buddha human?

    Well the Hindu’s claim that the Buddha was an incarnation of Vishnu, so of course he must have been transcendently special in their books. Although I have to say a lot of ancient religion gets kinda muddled when they start borrowing from eachother...

    lobster