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federica · seeker of the clear blue sky · Moderator

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federica
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  • Re: Buddhists and Guns

    The only good thing about owning a gun and not using it, is that it stops some other person owning it - and using it.

    Other than that, I think they're frankly a testimony to how many victims each gun might have created.

    "A toast to the weapons of War: May they Rust in Peace."

    Hozandhammachick
  • Re: The Buddhist version of happiness does not exist

    Also please note: We are not psychologists, psychiatrists, counsellors, advisors or professional therapists. We're just people who frequent a Buddhist forum, although some are content to be called Buddhist, others are more... 'nondescript' in their calling....
    So if it should come to it, there is no form of advice we can give with regard to your own personal psychological progress, or how to go about remedying, improving, altering or expanding your own well-being other than to give you what we know works, with regard to Buddhist philosophy and concepts.

    We're not here to defend Buddhism either, it needs no defence. It's done pretty well for 2.5k years, I'm sure it will continue to do so.
    But if you are mistaken or you might hold an opinion which needs further dissection, we'll mention it.

    Like I have.

    ETA: if you have anhedonia, then you don't actually feel any form of delight in anything, no matter whether there is an additional psychological/psychiatric condition (such as depression, social anxiety, paranoia....) or not.
    It is a condition in and of itself which precludes any form of sense of pleasure, so to state that happiness in Buddhist terms doesn't exist, is an academic error. For anyone who displays an anhedonic temperament, it would apply to Christian, Muslim, Jewish, Hindu and any other description of Happiness.

    Wouldn't it?
    So that's a red herring....

    Hozan
  • Re: The Buddhist version of happiness does not exist

    We can't help you, because you're listening, but you're not hearing.

    You're taking in what we say and responding at face value, instead of stopping to research and investigate....

    Incidentally, your hedonistic lifestyle that once was, but is no more, is absolutely indicative of the 4 Noble Truths.

    Life is Stress, up-and-down, changeable, convoluted. (1)

    It is stressful (and all of the above) because we cling to that which we wish to make permanent, and cannot, and cling to the notion of ending what stresses us negatively, for good, which we can't. (2)

    There is however, an extremely effective and workable antidote to this state of perpetual flux, this yo-yo, this see-saw (Teeter-totter) of happiness, dissatisfaction, joy, sorrow, elation, depression....(3)

    The solution, remedy or antidote, is the Eightfold path.(4).

    It is but a moment's reading, but a lifetime of study.

    I would respectfully suggest you read up on the matter.

    Start with "The TIbetan Book of Living & Dying" (Author Sogyal Rinpoche)
    The Lama Surya Das Trilogy (3 separate books) of

    Awakening the Buddha within, Awakening the Sacred, and Awakening the Buddhist heart.

    dhammachickWalkerHozan
  • Re: The Buddhist version of happiness does not exist

    yup.
    Screwed up there too. You just don't get it.
    You are obviously in a state of negative denial, because you insist that your misery is beyond your control; it's chemical. So really, if it's chemical, it needs chemical attention.

    @HyperRealm said: So, is the Buddhist version of happiness simply having value, worth, beauty, etc. in your life even in the absence of your good feelings?

    You're in a total muddle here, aren't you? The whole point is to be able to transcend any attachment to value, worth, beauty, etc in order to liberate yourself from the shackles of the mundane....

    I personally think that having value, worth, joy, inspiration, and beauty in your life presuppose the experience of a good feeling.

    Nope.

    I don't think you can have those things in your life without your good feelings.

    Yes, you can.
    I've seen people who have everything they could possibly ever want in life - and they're still miserable.
    I've seen people completely and totally bereft of any social worth, advantage or benefit, and their happiness, serenity and contentment, is palpable.

    Like I said, you need to research more, because i think you're muddling concepts.

    dhammachickHozan
  • Re: The Buddhist version of happiness does not exist

    I am just someone who wants to feel good all the time, be wild, free, etc. (i.e. hedonistic)

    Impossible, in anyone's book. Even ours. This is utterly unrealistic, and as "ignorant" of happiness as your view of Buddhism is....

    Are you in counselling? CBT and NLP are both known to be highly successful in helping those afflicted with these conditions, to cope with, and even overcome them.

    As @karasti has pointed out, we have several members who have various mental afflictions, disorders, conditions and illnesses, all of whom have - without exception - benefited enormously from studying, learning, practising and following Buddhist teachings, techniques and practice.
    It sounds very much, even through your lament, that you have cultivated a resistance to some Buddhist tenets purely and simply because they do not resonate with you.

    It's as if because you can't see how it works, then it can't possibly have any significance for you.
    Until you leave yourself more open to exploring the discipline and practice of Buddhism, then I don't see how we can get through to you.

    We can't supply an answer to give you what you want, at the drop of a hat. It takes time, dedication, study and practice.
    But it works.
    If you DO the work.
    If you want us to show you a solution to just drop in your lap and completely change who you currently are, then sadly, you're out of luck.

    karastiHozan