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genkaku Veteran

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Username
genkaku
Location
Northampton, Mass. U.S.A.
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Location
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  • Re: Depression as a result of meditation

    But if what's happening to me is more like a diving well, where there is no light at the end of the tunnel and it just keeps getting darker, they'll be a point where I've gone too deep and there isn't a chance to make it back.

    I think one of the surest companions of those who interest themselves in spiritual practice/life is the realization that 1. it's not a bed of roses and 2. the fear that if I follow this path, I may evaporate, get deeply and irretrievably lost and become a first-class candidate for the nut-house. Point number two is a very large EEK because lurking below the surface is the desire to be who I am AND to tack on a little of that serene stuff called enlightenment. The question arises, "What if I go and never come back?"

    [A woman friend once summed up the meditator's quandary perfectly when, as a group of us sat around and admitted our Buddhist goals for the future, she said, "When I grow up, I want to be a rich ... sexy ... SAINT!"]

    Leaving aside the question of adequately defining who I am in the first place (not intellectual defining but real I-know-it defining)...

    There is some common sense that needs to be applied.

    There is nothing wrong with seeing a psychological counselor.

    It may be that loneliness is a problem ... go outside!

    Is meditation going to cure all ills or simply send me to the rubber room?

    If all of this and more like it becomes too pressing or depressing, then stop doing it. See how that works. And don't worry about if you "never come back:" As a friend of mine used to say, "wherever you go, there you are." Nothing fancy ... it's just the truth, isn't it? Never come back???? Where would anyone come back from? And where would they start from in the process of getting to a "there" they now cannot come back from?

    It all gets pretty complicated and swirly.

    Might use the time better in meditation.

    Or, seriously, not.

    Remember, without you, Buddhism would drop dead.

    No kidding.

    There was once said to have been a time when Gautama was asked to sum up his teachings short-and-sweet. According to the tale, he grew quiet and then, "summoning all of his powers," he replied, "It's not intellectual."

    Keromelobster
  • Re: Can anyone explain this facet of bowing?

    Why?

    It's like the army ... do it because the sergeant says so. :)

    upekka
  • Re: Adam and Eve

    The story of Adam and Eve is just an early explanation of why men eat ribs ... or something like that :)

    JeffreykarastiVastmindHozanWill_BakerfedericaBunks
  • Trump operatics :)

    Passed along in email ....

    FosdickShoshinNirvanaWalkersatcittananda
  • Re: Must it be breathing?

    I'm a fan of counting exhalations -- one to ten and begin again. When something like a Big Mac interferes, just go back to one. The counting offers focus, even if it too can be a pain in the patoot.

    My feeling these days is that anyone who can count from one to ten without interruption can give up Buddhism and take up another hobby. :)

    lobsterSpinyNorman