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  • Re: Stymied in meditation

    @nakazcid said:
    To me boredom means "lack of stimulation." When I was a teenager and young adult, it was A Fate Worse Than Death (TM.) That POV has diminished, but I still find it an unpleasant sensation that I feel an aversion to.

    Ah.
    Firstly I feel you have the maturity to understand that boredom is interesting or at least can be explored ...

    So I guess I'll "tighten up" my practice and use a bit more (but not too much) discipline.

    I feel that is the more mature approach.
    However ... there is another way. Examples are:

    • Walking meditation
    • Focus on an internally created or external mandala. In Tantra initiates commonly focus on an image of their guru/lama/teacher or a personification of a Buddha quality (yidam). In Shingon exploration or focus on letters keeps the mind occupied.
    • Posture based meditation, as in Qi-ong, or maintaining a yoga posture for at least a minute

    Keeping the mind or mind/body occupied is a simple example of 'tricking' the mind into settling.

    OM MANI PEME HUM (mantra is another common mind filler/occupier) to settle the easily bored mind ...

    silver
  • Re: Secret Buddhist

    @silver said:
    Are those good answers?

    Yes =)
    The inner smile is a superpower ... ;)

    silver
  • Re: Stymied in meditation

    @nakazcid said:
    Just power through the boredom?

    Try a boring meditation. Try and be bored. What does it feel like, where in the body? Give the mind the task of being bored ... and it will get bored and go elsewhere ... 😎

    Tee hee.

    silverDavid
  • Re: Why there is no way back for religion in the West

    @dhammachick said:
    Why stop at Abrahamic religions @David ? The Baghavad Gita takes place on a battlefield. Or maybe this thread is just an excuse to take out some frustration.

    Oh, did I just type that out loud?

    B)

    I consider the Bhagavaad Gita profound. I have found value in all three Abrahamic religions. Though I cherry pick. Which of course we dharma fanists do too ... :3

    We are in this sense, following whatever we make Buddhist dharma to be. Anything from an occasional hobby to a complete way ... just as with all other ways ... o:)

    dhammachick
  • Re: Why there is no way back for religion in the West

    I tend to view it as a practical dancing to happiness psychology much as @DhammaDragon mentions

    Dogma can bolster, restrict or be used for raft/book burning as required. The mind responds to ritual, temporary beliefs/knowing. Acccording to various depths of understanding or abandoment, elements of philosophy and religion have emotional reasurance and pragmatic models of support ...

    OM MANI FESTO PEME GONE, GONE, GONE BEYONDER ...
    http://www.insamadhi.com/clanki/gone-gone-beyond-anatta/

    ShoshinSocair