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yagr Veteran

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yagr
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  • Re: Balancing Spiritual Life, Political Activism/Anger

    @karasti said:
    So when you said now that we know, we can address the problem, I'm curious what you have in mind? How do you address it? As a country, we thought we had in the past, but it only resulted in pushing those people down until conditions were ripe for them to elect someone like Trump. It seems to me we need to deal with the conditions and the root causes more than just the people who believe in those things. But I still don't know how.

    Oddly, in spite of the @yagr tag, I wasn't alerted to this post. By the time I saw it I had to put off responding till the weekend. Anywho...

    There's so much in what you've written, I'm not sure where to start but let's try this: You said that as a country we thought we had addressed these issues but clearly we did not. Now we know. Information is power. I think we address it in a grassroots kind of way. For instance, in my place of employment, the person above my paygrade that I like the most is a Trump supporter. He's also a very kind-hearted man, hard-working, ethical, etc.

    I have looked for and found ways to discuss issues that have the potential to change the way that he views the world without challenging his views of the world. For instance, my department is made up entirely of American Indians. There are no other American Indians working in the company. Every department has its issues except one...mine. THAT is something he is very interested in. Our productivity has increased over 100% within the last year. There have been zero sick days taken by anyone who works for me over the last year. Zero tardies. He made it racial when he asked me what it was about these people that made them such good workers. I let him and educated him about the realities of life in the United States for this minority group.

    One in eight people on the reservation don't have running water. One in eleven don't have electricity. He was shocked. How is it that people in the United States choose to live that way? Then he discovered that we don't have city water access on the rez. Then he discovered that if we want electricity we need to pay $12.50 a foot and $600 per pole (at 150' increments) to get electricity to our home sites. Then he discovered that there is no public transportation to the city and jobs so that those who find themselves out of work have to travel 125 miles per day or more to get to the place with jobs. It was a surprise for him to learn that we don't need car insurance on the rez so even if you have a car, you can't drive off the rez to work until you get insurance and the never insured pay more.

    He exclaimed, "These people aren't lazy, the deck is stacked against them!" I watched the wheels turning as he said this and tried to think of ways that he could help expand opportunities for them. Last week he asked me to find some people from the rez that he could interview personally for a different department. Then, he went so far as to ask me what he should know about our culture that might impact his interpretations as to whether or not the interview was successful or not. Things like, living in a community where so many go without running water, they might not meet your standards of cleanliness and 'dressing up' for an interview, but if they know that it is required moving forward, they'll meet those requirements. He nodded along willing to overlook things like this in the short term. So, that's one guy...but it's a start.

    I guess in the end, it helps to not take adversarial positions against those who's beliefs are so different from ours, but to find common ground where possible - like our mutual desire to see the company we both work for be successful. Understanding that he does not think the way he thinks because he is evil but because he is ignorant, and not willfully ignorant, but experientially ignorant. Anywho, not sure that this is a template to save the world, but this fellow is changing his thinking, his world has gotten bigger, and I'm the one guy that he has confided in that he is second guessing his support for Trump - but don't tell anyone.

    personJeffreykarastiShoshinlobsterdhammachick
  • Re: premature immaculation

    @Kerome said:
    A job is about money, but what is the worst case? Living on the streets in ten years' >time?

    I have land that you can grow a garden on and a trailer you can live on if it comes to that. Find something else to worry about. <3

    KeromeHozanShoshin
  • Re: What is your impression of Ajahn Brahm?

    My trauma therapist asked me to come up with three beings - a person, either real or imaginary (character from a tv show or from literature, etc), or animal that I would want in my corner as part of a team if I didn't feel safe. Ajahn Brahm was on that list. Oh what the heck...the other two were her and Aslan from The Chronicles of Narnia.

    ShoshinBunksHozan
  • Re: What are your 'wow' moments in Buddhism?

    I think the realization, while doing the dishes maybe twenty-five years ago, that I was truly present a moment before the realization and that the experience cleared up so much theory.

    Hozandhammachick
  • Re: Trump

    Despite decades of practice, I find that I have not improved significantly in foretelling the future. What I have learned is that for every hopeless situation I have been in, an exit has appeared. Trump will be no different.

    In fact, it is quite possible that the country will come out of this administration stronger. People who were not interested in politics have awakened. Cities and states have decided to honor the climate accord instead of placing the burden for responsibility on the federal government. Most people, on both sides of the political divide, believe the federal government has too much power...perhaps the people will be motivated to act more locally and put an end to that continuous power grab.

    Get worked up or don't...but I'm going to let the darkness illustrate the light all around. Like this place and you people.

    lobsterHozanDakinipersonkarasti