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FoibleFull Veteran

About

Username
FoibleFull
Location
Canada
Joined
Visits
164
Last Active
Roles
Member
Points
902
Location
Canada
Affiliation
Gelug / Tibetan

Comments

  • @Bunks said: @FoibleFull said: You should focus on doing your Buddhist practices, and developing compassion for others. Rather than focusing on strengthening your attachment to your ego. As for being imperfect, until…
  • You should focus on doing your Buddhist practices, and developing compassion for others. Rather than focusing on strengthening your attachment to your ego. As for being imperfect, until enlightenment we are all imperfect. It is a given. But we…
  • Sounds a lot like strengthening our 8 Worldly Concerns. The older monks and lamas never take credit for the things they do and deflect praise. The 8 Concerns That Prevent Happiness: Taking delight in having money and material possessions , Be…
  • If it works for you, that is fine. Our mind works with our concepts. But what it actually means (as explained to me by a Tibetan Lama) is: "Om" refers to the state of Buddhahood. The body/speech/mind of being a Buddha. "Mani" refers to the sta…
  • As per "The Heart Sutra", we are and we are not. A student once asked our teacher, "Is it true we aren't real?" He thought for a moment and said "Try slamming a car door on your hand and THEN saying you aren't real" We DO exist. It is just tha…
  • This may be just a difference in semantics, but I think that looking at life from the outside creates disunity from yourself. A mental-emotional imbalance that can lead to serious results. And that what we need is MORE unity WITHOUT being pushed by…
  • I recommend "Mindfulness in Plain English" by Bhante Gunaratana, I received my copy from a friend, who had been given it to him by a Sri Lankan bhante/monk. And as per the instructions on the back of the book, I passed it on when I was done with i…
  • We often think of happiness as being temporarily distracted from our inner unhappiness. This is distraction, rather than happiness. "Since happiness is a state of mind, then the source of happiness must lie within the mind and not in external ci…
  • Until full enlightenment, no one will be perfect. And most of us (myself included) are not SO far down the path that we draw a fully-enlightened being to us for teachings. All we need is someone who is ahead of us, who can show us our next steps…
  • A good teacher is precious. For those without access, there are some very good teachers speaking on Facebook. Even a few Western monks/nuns.
    in Ajahn Chah Comment by FoibleFull July 8
  • I have belonged to a local sangha for 19 years. We do not discuss the dharma between us. We rely on our teacher for direction and understanding. Among ourselves, when we are NOT in the shrine room, we chat like any non-sangha person would (how are …
  • I have found that the more I try to "figure out" Buddhist teachings with my mind, the less I understand them. But by DOING the meditation and other practices, gradually things start to dawn on you. Without the effort of intellectually trying to fi…
  • When I was young, I was active in the Civil Rights Movement, the Peace Movement (Vietnam War years) and supporting politiicans (those few) that I approved of (none of them ever won). My mom, who had practiced yoga/meditations since 1930, said that …
    in Politics! Comment by FoibleFull July 1
  • Yeah, that sounds like a Canadian Buddhist.
  • "So are you suggesting I should still continue my friendship with this person after he has harmed two people I am very close to?" I am not suggesting anything. No one judges another on their practice, and until we are enlightened it is unrealist…
  • You don’t need to tell him WHY, but you DO need to tell him what. That is the compassionate thing to do. And Buddhism pushes compassion because the less we focus on ourselves, the less we become “stuck” in our attachments and aversions. Now if I …
  • Rebirth or not-rebirth? This is question which has no knowable answer. Unless we have just died and there is existence (and therefore awareness) after death. Even "memories" of past lives (which I have had) may be nothing more than an over-active …
  • As the Dalai Lama says, "From the moment of birth, every human being wants happiness and does not want suffering." The difference between the Dalai Lama and Hitler is that the Dalai Lama KNOWS how to be happy. What actions produce happiness and w…
  • The side-effect of mindfulness is compassion. This benefits society. But I doubt if mindfulness will ever become an epidemic in society!
  • The practice is suppose to be 24/7. But I keep on getting distracted and forget to do it.
  • Sounds good, but actually we only have the POTENTIAL to recognize this enlightenment. It's just not that easy.
  • We have been raised to believe that happiness comes from outside of ourselves, so it is easy to become materialistic. It sounds SO easy ... just get the right "things" in life, and happiness is supposedly guaranteed. It would be nice if it was tha…
  • If you have no direct, in-person access to a qualified teacher, do Theravadan Buddhism. Tibetans will tell you that if you practice their Buddhism (Vajrayana) without the personal guidance of a teacher, it can drive you crazy. Zen master will tell…
  • To me this link reads as being very "New Agey" ... i.e., increasing ones attachments (and conversely, one's aversions). Still trapped on the merry-go-round of trying to be happy by what you do and how you see yourself. Rather the opposite directio…
  • The purpose of the Precepts is to help us see how enslaved we are. When we resist these impulses we have the of opportunity to observe and learn. If we just give in to our cravings, we don't have that opportunity for mindful learning. It is not w…
  • The hardest thing, for me, is to let go of the attitude that things should always go the way I want them to. And that when I am not happy with something this means something is wrong and the situation (rather than my own perspective) needs to be fi…
  • I think it is important to have a teacher and a sangha to interact with. The things you learn from a teacher, you learn on a subliminal level that you cannot get any other way. And if your teacher is worthy of being a teacher, much of this is HOW …
  • "Buddha" is a state of being. We are ALL "Buddhas", according to the monks. We just don't know it. THE Buddha was just one enlightened being ... Siddhartha.
  • I don't think you need to worry about it. My sister's teacher (a Buddhist monk) told her that addictions do not pass on, although the tendency to overdo something can pass on. The addiction itself is rooted in the body of this lifetime. I would th…
  • If you have a qualified teacher in your city, in any of the 3 traditions (Zen, Theravadan, Vajrayana), take lessons from them and meditate as they instruct you. If you do not have access to a teacher, then Theravadan is the tradition that is suit…
  • What is there besides logic? Being. Just Being. That is what meditation cultivates. It is essentially experiential/right-brain, as opposed to logic/cognitive/ego-based left-brain. Research has found that right-brain function increases during …
  • "Buddha" is not a title. It is a state of awareness. However, when we talk about "The Buddha" we are referring to the Shakyamuni Buddha - Siddhartha. As for faith, when Buddhists teachers talk about faith, they are talking about having the fait…
  • You can check out this website. I have never accessed it (nor Gelek Rimpoche) since I we have a Geshe teaching in my own city. But my sister, living elsewhere, was introduced to Tibetan Buddhism by Gelek Rimpoche and was very impressed with him. …
  • In the Beginner's Class (given by a Tibetan Buddhist monk) the teacher asked what was the best way to help others. After several suggestions, the teacher told us the Buddhist answer: To attain enlightenment, and the continue to be reborn in the hu…
    in Healing Comment by FoibleFull March 31
  • The urge to have power is a natural response to the fact that life is unpredictable and uncertain. It is not an urge that can eliminate this fear about uncertainty, but just as alcoholics try to self-medicate their inner pain away, so too we seek p…
  • The experiences of meditation are not the goal. Oh, in Hindu yoga it is the goal. But not in Buddhism. In fact, Buddhist monks will tell you that if you focus too much on the meditation experiences, you will just be distracting yourself. The pur…
  • Two things I like best: One is a story Sharon Salzberg wrote about. The Dalai Lama took a tour of a Catholic monastery, observing how they made cheese and fruitcake to support the monastery. At the end of the tour, he was giving a taste of the ch…
  • There are 3 basic traditions of Buddhism: Zen, Vajrayana (Tibetan) and Theravadan. I have read the pursuing Zen without the guidance of a master/teacher is a waste of time. But since I have no Zen teacher and have not pursued Zen buddhism, I can…
  • Yes, Buddhism has gradually made me more sensitive. The practices make you more aware, so it increases all awareness and sensitivity is one of the things you will become more aware of. But you don't reason with your emotions. They are not logica…
  • Silencing the mind does not mean "non-thought". It means observing the constant ever-changing flow of thoughts without being swept away, hooked, by them. You still observe, you still have responses, but they do not control you. However, ALL actio…
  • Until enlightenment, we are all crazy. Even our teachers. ALL we need from our teacher is that they be a little further down the path than we are. I cannot speak for you, but I'm not so far down the path that I require an enlightened Buddha for m…