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Dakini Veteran

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Dakini
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  • OP, my take is, that they don't know what Enlightenment is. In the case of the people on the forum you described, they're mistaking a drug high with genuine Enlightenment, which is about non-attachment, insight, and compassion; qualities you don't a…
  • OP, the Dalai Lama recently said, after meeting with victims of abusive lamas, and reading pages of written testimony they gave him describing the experiences and trauma each of them suffered, that there are lamas out there who simply don't care abo…
  • What motivates me is, that it's such a nice vacation from the chattering mind!
  • ^^^. Literally, the picture of Impermanence!
  • All is not lost, however, Bunks. You can soften the karmic blow, by doing good deeds, and leading an ethical life. The rest of your life is ahead of you, full of karmic potential.
  • The Buddha encouraged lay followers who were gifted in business matters, to make the most of their talents, for the benefit of the sangha and others. The key is to dedicate one's efforts to improving life for others, and following the Eightfold Path…
  • @Bunks said: That’s an interesting point @federica. I used to drink heavily back in the day and sometimes I wonder if the kammic consequences of some of the stupid things I did while drunk will come back to haunt me or will it be exonerated f…
  • It's still a very controversial question, as to whether it's a biological illness, or the result of early childhood trauma. There was a psychotherapist in the US, who cured a patient of schizophrenia, by doing very intensive trauma therapy work with…
  • @federica said: The resurrection has often been cited as a metaphor for the renewal of life. This is why Christians purloined the Feast of Oestros as a pretty good explanation of Christ's rising from the dead. Reincarnation was an accepted an…
  • @Kerome said: Here in the Netherlands it is a pretty strong tradition, with all kinds of coverage on the media. There is this show called The Passion where a cast of characters take over a town and there is an organised procession of a cross thro…
  • Find a good therapist, who specializes in childhood abandonment, grief, and trauma. Google a few names in your city, study their websites to see who sounds like they have effective techniques, and who resonates with you, then call and talk to them o…
  • When did Good Friday become a holiday? It wasn't, when I was a kid and young adult. Where I currently live, in NM, it is, because it's a Hispanic state, which means--Catholic. But in CA it wasn't a holiday, nor in WA. Later, some businesses chose t…
  • @ZenSam said: @person The Tattvasaṃgraha Tantra, classed as a "Yoga tantra", is one of the first Buddhist tantras which focuses on liberation as opposed to worldly goals and in the Vajrasekhara Tantra the concept of the five Buddha familie…
  • @ZenSam said: First of all, i have no idea what this is, and thats why i'm posting this. Trying to learn about it from non- buddhist sources left a pretty bad taste in my mouth, it was basically described as s*x=enlightenment, but this is almost …
  • One of the Buddha's discourses on right and wrong speech: "Potaliya, four kinds of people exist and can be found in the world. What kinds? 1) Some blame those who should be blamed, according to the truth, at the proper time, but do not praise th…
  • @SE25Wall said: I often find the calls in Buddhism to "calm/silence/watch the mind" troubling. Does this circumvent the political? How can we act and engage with political action/thought if we are constantly training ourselves to silence the mind…
  • My guess is, that people can manage to do both, without either detracting from the other. I think it's good to chart a course, and aim to improve oneself and one's circumstances, as long as one doesn't get too attached to the outcome. As you point o…
  • Do you mind if I ask where you live, @Namada? This wouldn't be near, or among, Native/First Nations peoples, would it? Tragically, suicide is common in the more isolated communities. I'm wondering if these young people, like the one whose girlfrien…
    in bury a friend Comment by Dakini April 6
  • @Zero said: I read the compassion angle as being compassion for the opposite sex in misconstruing the relationship and falling in love; not that practice leads to compassion which leads to interest from the opposite sex. …
  • I've had some of my best meditation sessions out in my backyard, with the wind rustling in the trees and the occasional chirping of birds, along with the garden fragrances, as a background. I find it helps calm the mind to focus on those elements, a…
  • @Kerome said: I think it is useful to make a distinction between feeling “a little down” and being clinically depressed. This. For phases of "feeling down", exercise, as Kerome pointed out, can help. For more chronic "down" episodes, star…
  • @adamcrossley said: @Dakini, I take your point. We must have read his posts differently. We’ll see how it develops I guess. I see where you're coming from, now. You inferred from his thread title, that he views compassion as the key eleme…
  • @adamcrossley said: I can’t say I noticed any change, but then I was with my girlfriend before I became a Buddhist. But let’s entertain your premise for a moment, @Namada, which is basically that Buddhism can make you more compassionate, a…
  • OP, I don't understand why you're associating your social success with Buddhism. Could you elaborate further on that? Was there a sudden change, after you became a Buddhist? There are plenty of jerks in Buddhism, too, as the various abuse scandals c…
  • @Kerome said: How many instances are there in history of people successfully overhauling structures that cause suffering? I can’t recall many, or even any... the French Revolution was a bloody affair, and arguably caused as much suffering as …
  • The goal can be simpllfied down to: "non-attachment to ego". We need a basic, functional "self" to deal with the world on an everyday basis, as did the Buddha. The problems come in when we over-identify with self, or ascribe admirable qualities (or…
  • @yoda_soda said: Hi all, I'm wondering about something. The Tibetan tradition really fascinates me. I'd like to study it more. But I know Vajrayana practice requires a guru (and I probably won't find one where I'm living). Are there aspects of it…
  • @adamcrossley said: There have been a few discussions on here recently about the risk of becoming nihilistic through Buddhist philosophy. We’ve mostly agreed that nihilism was far from the message of the Buddha. My problem is, when I get d…
  • Why not study Taoism? It seems to have less baggage. I've seen Wilbur's name come up on a cult watch forum. I'll look into it for you. But if Zen seems too zany, why not skip past it, and go straight to Taoism? Just a thought.
  • I wasn't able to open your attachment, but I first got turned on to Buddhism at that age. I was enchanted by the logic of it! The 4 Noble Truths and the Eightfold Path were enough to intrigue me, to the point that I started doing my own reading at t…
  • OP, it sounds from your description, that he's missing an important piece in his practice. Meditation/insight is only part of the package. Another key part of the package, is developing compassion. The Buddha cautioned against nihilism. The inter…
  • Thank you for your dedication, Ling. Happy New Year! P.S. As long as you're working on an overhaul of sorts, I'd like to put in a plug for the return of the old emojis, if I may. They were cool.
  • OP, Stephen Batchelor gives a very simple and practical explanation of it. He says it's really not about anything mysterious or complex. It's simply about the fact, that as human beings, we're always growing and changing, so there's no point in iden…
  • Even without a deity, Zen Buddhists get everything else a major religion offers: Traditional spiritual teachings and practices, scriptures and literature collected over the course of millennia, ritual and ceremony, religious community, mythology and…
  • @Buddhalotus said: What makes Buddhism so hard to pin as religion is the fact that it is not a theistic spiritual practice. Without any gods playing dice nor sorting out fates, the only choice we have is to become accountable for o…
  • @yagr said: why the hell won't it fall away? Old habits die hard?
  • Dzongsar Khyentse has come under considerable criticism for his callous attitude, and reprehensible jokes, about the sexual abuse crisis in Buddhism, which is especially severe in Rigpa, whom he's interim spiritual director of. He's really discredit…
  • Well, some people say, that the existential crisis provoked by realizing you are a state of constant change, is the point. That's where learning truly begins. We could also say, that "you" are the mind-stream made up of your cumulative experience…
  • Congratulations, OP! You must have been doing something right!
  • Did you get why Suzuki said, "So you can enjoy your old age"? It means, that meditation helps extend your life, so that you'll have an old age to enjoy. Look at all the people who keel in their 50's and 60's. They never even get to old age. Their l…
  • Sure he wants a child, OP, because you would be doing all the work! A child is something that, from his perspective, you would gift him with, and then you'd do all the childcare, just as you're doing all the housework, and his mom did everything for…
  • OP, your query gives the impression that you define "practice" very narrowly. Our practice is so much more than just meditation; it's about fostering and manifesting compassion in myriad ways, and about cultivating the wisdom that would guide our co…
  • @Asabasstsi said: Hello! A question. If Buddha saw an animal which was injured or suffering, what would he do, if he were the only person who could do something? Would he think the suffering is karmic so no need to act? Or would he …