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  • edited March 2010
    hello, i'm looking for biographies on buddha. i am interested in a rather comphresensive biography that dicusses his ENTIRE life, before and after enlightenment. something worth reading, i will go thru here to see if recommendations have already been maid BUT IF AnyoONE wants T OHELP ME, that'd be greAT
  • edited March 2010
    hello, i'm looking for biographies on buddha. i am interested in a rather comphresensive biography that dicusses his ENTIRE life, before and after enlightenment. something worth reading, i will go thru here to see if recommendations have already been maid BUT IF AnyoONE wants T OHELP ME, that'd be greAT

    PBS will have a documentary on the life of the Buddha, before and after enlightenment on April 7th... if you prefer to read the story, I believe Old Path White Clouds by Thich Nhat Hanh might be what you are looking for. I have a copy of the book, but I won't start it until I'm done the Art of Happiness. It was recommended to me, but I really don't know much about it's content yet.

    Biographies on the Buddha shouldn't be hard to find though.
  • edited March 2010
    Greetings all

    Here are some excerpts from one of my all-time favourite books. Not exactly Buddhist but I loved it. I highly recommend it ...

    "True, or unconditional, love is unaware of the strange demands you impose on your relationships. Love is the same for all. Your attempts to reserve love for specific relationships and then withold it from others is the very thing that has blocked your vision of love's presence. Give as love gives - just as the sun that gives its light to all who ask, or the sparrow that sings not for the one who listens, but for the song itself. When you give love, love is your reward. When you judge some people as worthy of your giving and other people as undeserving, then it is you who is undeserving; not because you have been judged by love but because you have forgotten love's law."

    ~ James Twyman, "Emissary of Light"
  • edited April 2010
    Phagmodrupa: Engaging by Stages in the Teachings of the Buddha
  • edited May 2010
    I would add:

    Turning The Mind Into An Ally - Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche
    Dharma Punx - Noah Levine
  • TreeLuvr87TreeLuvr87 Veteran
    edited May 2010
    I'm reading an amazing book right now called Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With the Heart of A Buddha by Tara Brach. It's mainly focused on self-love but also does a great job at incorporating many buddhist principles in your pursuit of love. Talks a lot about how most of us live in what Brach terms the, "trance of unworthiness." I'll write a more detailed review upon completion, but can already tell this is a great one!
  • seeker242seeker242 Zen Florida, USA Veteran
    edited May 2010
    I read radical acceptance a couple of months ago. It is a very good book! Love and compassion for oneself is just as important as love and compassion for others.

    I also just finished reading

    Eight Mindful Steps to Happiness: Walking the Buddha's Path by Bhante Henepola Gunaratana This one is a plain English explanation and commentary on the eightfold path. Really good!

    One of my favorite books though is The Three Pillars of Zen: Teaching, Practice, and Enlightenment by Philip Kapleau Roshi

    This book almost made me want to become a monk.

    p.s. Someone in my meditation group purchased the PBS documentary on the life of the Buddha and donated it to the group. We are going to make (shhhh) copies for anyone who wants one. I can make anyone a copy if they want just PM me (shhhh hehe)

    I also just purchased Discourse on the Heart Sutra by the Dalai Lama DVD off Ebay. I can copy that too if anyone wants it, shhh LOL.
  • edited May 2010
    1. The 6th Patriarch great master Dharma Jewel Platform Sutra
    (Lok Tzoe Dye See Fard Bowl Tarn Ging)
    (Liu Zu Da Shi Fa Bao Tan Jing)
    (Tripitaka No. 2008)
    Compiled during the Tang Dynasty by FardHoy, the prentice of the master

    2. The Śūraṅgama Sūtra: A New Translation
    http://surangama.drba.org/?page_id=2
  • edited May 2010
    hello, i'm looking for biographies on buddha. i am interested in a rather comphresensive biography that dicusses his ENTIRE life, before and after enlightenment. something worth reading, i will go thru here to see if recommendations have already been maid BUT IF AnyoONE wants T OHELP ME, that'd be greAT

    A traditional biographical source is the wonderful two volume translation of the Lalitavistara Sutra titled The Voice of the Buddha. Dharma publishing may still have it in print.

    Here are some used copies:

    http://www.abebooks.com/servlet/SearchResults?kn=bays&sts=t&tn=voice++of+the+buddha&x=47&y=12
  • edited May 2010
    I really enjoyed 'Buddhism for mothers' - I think that's what it was called, funny thing is, I've lost my copy :hrm:
  • edited May 2010
    Hello Everyone,

    I am interested in Buddhism and I'd like to improve my knowledge about this religion.
    I read already quite some time ago Idiot's guide for 'Eastern Philosophy', though very shallow it was very easy to read, I also read 'Siddhartha' from Herman Hesse (this book was cited in this thread), good book but mainly a novel I'd say. I read last year a comprehensive book on Buddhism in French (as I happen to be French) 'Le grand livre du Bouddhisme' from Alain Grosrey, lots of information (almost 1000 pages!), however it was way too complex for me. I am now reading 'Healing Anger' from the Dalai Lama, but I also think it's too complicated for me, since I guess the author assumes from the readers already some awareness about Buddhism especially Tibetan Buddhism...
    My feeling is that most of the information we receive about Buddhism in our western society is mainly focused on Tibetan Buddhism... Do you share the same impression?

    I'd like to get advices from this forum participants regarding introduction books (i.e. easy to follow for beginners) about:
    1. Eastern religions in general (Taoism, Buddhism, Hinduism, Confucianism, etc.)
    2. Buddhism in general
    3. Theravada Buddhism
  • edited May 2010
    Augustus wrote: »
    I'd like to get advices from this forum participants regarding introduction books (i.e. easy to follow for beginners) about:
    1. Eastern religions in general
    (Taoism
    http://www.buddhanet.net/pdf_file/liaofan.pdf

    Hinduism,
    http://www.hinduism.co.za/deepaval.htm

    Confucianism, etc.)
    http://www.buddhismaustralia.org/dizi.html

    2. Buddhism in general
    http://www.buddhanet.net/e-learning/basic-guide.htm
    http://www.urbandharma.org/pdf/budglossary.pdf

    3. Theravada Buddhism
    http://www.buddhanet.net/pdf_file/damapada.pdf
  • edited May 2010
    You HAVE to read 365 Zen by Jean Smith if you are just getting into Buddhism

    Basically what it does is take great passages from a variety of different authors for books on Buddhism. Excellent read.
  • edited May 2010
    i was pleasantly surprised by charlotte jokko beck's "nothing special", short little essays full of clear wisdom. i'm not a zen person but i keep a copy in my car. you can simply open it up anywhere. wisdom to go.
  • edited May 2010
    Hi everyone, I've just joined this forum, mainly because I was looking for some advice on what to read.

    I've already read something like a conspectus of the Buddha's teaching that I've found on the internet, ~70xA4 pages.

    I want to study buddhism deeper, I'd grateful if someone could recommend me a book on eBay or somewhere, cause I don't want to print out hundred of pages :) Anyway, any pdf files are also welcome.

    I tried looking it up on buddhanet.net, but I didn't know what to pick because there was so much of the stuff :) So I decided to come here for an advice. Thanks ~!
  • edited May 2010
    Euler wrote: »
    Hi everyone, I've just joined this forum, mainly because I was looking for some advice on what to read.

    I've already read something like a conspectus of the Buddha's teaching that I've found on the internet, ~70xA4 pages.

    I want to study buddhism deeper, I'd grateful if someone could recommend me a book on eBay or somewhere, cause I don't want to print out hundred of pages :) Anyway, any pdf files are also welcome.

    I tried looking it up on buddhanet.net, but I didn't know what to pick because there was so much of the stuff :) So I decided to come here for an advice. Thanks ~!

    Try this one, The Way to Buddhahood:

    http://www.abebooks.com/servlet/SearchResults?sts=t&tn=way+to+buddhahood&x=51&y=6
  • edited May 2010
    James wrote: »
    I ordered What the Buddah taught at the library but until it comes i picked up Being Peace by Thich Nhat Hanh I really like it so far.

    I was just wondering if any of you guys have read it and what you think of it?

    Being Peace is a wonderful book. It was the first I read by TNH and set me on the path to many others. I'm not sure about his The Heart of the Buddha's Teachings for beginners. I worry that it might be a bit difficult for a beginner, though that may be more of a comment on my own intellectual limitations. I would certainly recommend Old Path White Clouds. For beginners I suggest autobiographical works also, e.g. The Dalai Lama's Freedom in Exile and Tenzin Palmo's Cave in the Snow. TNH's A Lifetime of Peace, not an autobiography, but chapters by and about him, is a very good introduction to his life and teaching. Autobiographies and biographies do not set out Buddhist beliefs and practices systematically, but give you examples of how highly adept people can actually live the dharma. Having an exemplar to relate to on the path, as well as your own experiences, is helpful in relating to the systematic teachings, IMHO.:)
  • edited May 2010
    The book " Happiness " by TNH is required reading. It's nothing new, a compilation from other books, have read to many of his books to mention. I like the fact that I found a local sangha led by a Brother ordained by Tich Naht Hahn. One thing lacking though from my view is discussions of the suttas and cannons.

    On my own I found a few good works that divuldge that aspect of the dharmma.
  • edited June 2010
    I apologize if this has been done before, but if you had to chose one definitive Buddhist book to have with you on a desert island until the end of your days which book would it be?
    kind regards
    Gary
  • edited June 2010
    Hi Gary

    Intriguing question ... if I was on a desert island I wouldn't need much advice on how 2 treat other people :)

    I would usually answer with the book i happen 2 be reading at the moment, which is "The Lost Art of Compassion" by Lorne Ladner. I have only been reading it a couple of days but it makes some excellent points on being more compassionate 2 yourself & to others.

    I guess the book I could read MANY times would be "Awakening the Buddha Within".

    Looking forward 2 other people's point-of-view.

    Namaste
  • edited June 2010
    :D Geoff, I never said you would be alone on the desert island :D
    "The Lost Art of Compassion" and "Awakening The Buddha Within" will be added to my "to read list".
    Thank you:)
  • edited June 2010
    Assuming I was alone on this desert island I might take Ajahn Brahm's Mindfulness, Bliss and Beyond and work with it. Thich Nhat Hanh's Understanding Our Mind has plenty to keep one thinking, as do Paul Williams' books on Mahayana. Not a Buddhist book, but related, is Arthur Schopenhauer's The World as Will and Representation. I'm always thinking of re-reading that because there's so much in it to think about. As a novel I'd take Thomas Mann's The Magic Mountain, as that needs a re-read and provides plenty for reflection too.
  • edited June 2010
    Hello everyone and สวัสดีครับกรุงเทพ49 :D

    Actually I've read through the whole thread trying to boil down to the books that were coming out the most often; I also read critics that these books got on amazon... I found:
    Nothing Special: Living Zen from Steve Smith
    365 Zen: Daily Readings from Jean Smith
    The Heart of the Buddha's Teaching from Thich Nhat Hanh

    Thank you also for Wilfred and his very good list on web links...
    I was also looking for a book written from a Theravada perspective, do you happen to know one krungthep49 since I guess you're Theravada Buddhist?
  • edited June 2010
    Hello all and สวัสดีครับคุณโอกุสตัส(Augustus).

    My preference for reading material, unless it relates specifically to Thai Buddhism, is definitely Mahayana. However, the Ajahn Brahm book is written from a Theravada perspective. Ajahn Braham was a disciple of Ajahn Chah the famous Thai tudong (dhutanga - forest) monk and is now abbot of a Theravada monastic community in Western Australia.

    I'm not all that familiar with Theravada writing really, especially that I'd take to a desert island. I thought about the long and middle length discourses, edited by Bhikkhu Bodhi, but decide they're too stylized. I might change my mind on that though.:smilec:
  • edited June 2010
    Yes, you're right - I just assumed 'desert' meant 'deserted' island

    :)

    The more I get into the lost art of compassion the better it is. About a quarter through and we are into the four noble truths and sufferin and how 2 develop compassion & wisdom.

    Here's what the back of the book says that hooked me in -

    DON'T LEAVE HAPPINESS TO CHANCE

    Modern culture has overlooked one of the most powerful inner resources for creating a life of happiness and contentment. With The Lost Art of Compassion, clinical psychologist and long time Tibetan Buddhist practionerLorne Ladner rescues compassion from the margins and demonstrates its potential to transform our daily lives.

    While interest in positive psychology is just dawning in the West, the cultivation of compassion has been a cornerstone of Tibetan Buddhism for over a thousand years. This is the first book to incorporate the Tibetan Buddhist teachings most suited to the demands of our busy lives and provides a crucial perspective lacking in Western psychology. Bringing together the best contributions of psychology and Buddhism, Dr. Ladner bridges the gap between East and West, theory and practice, offering ten methods for cultivating joy and contentment amidst the everyday challenges we face. The result is a highly practical, user-friendly guide to discovering the neglected path of happiness in this modern world.

    Best of luck on your spiritual journey!

    Namaste
  • edited June 2010
    Thanks for your replies so far some interesting books listed.:)
  • edited June 2010
    I've taken the advice of this thread and just got my first Thich Nhat Hanh reading. It's just called "Essential Writings" - so I imagine it will be a nice overview.

    I'm at work now and was only to sneak in the first few pages, but I already can't wait until 5:00 to continue :smilec:
  • lightwithinlightwithin Veteran
    edited June 2010
    I've read three of Steve Hagen's books and I'd recommend them to anyone. If you like Zen's simplicity and the fact that it's devoid of almost all cultural and dogmatic aspects, you'll enjoy these books and his approach to Buddhism and life itself:
    - "Meditation Now Or Never": a clear, concise and eye opening book about what meditation really is and the common misconceptions held about it. Zen meditation at it's simplest. A good book for both beginners and advanced practicioners.

    -"Buddhism Plain And Simple". Easy to digest, short and to the point and cuts through all the fat to leave you with Buddhism's essential aspects.

    -"Buddhism Is Not What You Think": A more in-depth look at Buddhism through a Zen perspective.
  • edited June 2010
    Dhammapada- The Sayings of the Buddha by Thomas Byrom. Well-writen version in modern language that preserves the poetry of the original. I have the pocket edition that I keep in my briefcase for guidance and wisdom when needed (which is all the time). I keep going back to this...
  • edited June 2010
    First off, let me apologize in advance if I'm repeating someone else.

    Let's see...

    1.The Art of Happiness: A Handbook for Living by H.H. The Dalai Lama & Howard C Cutler

    - This book started it all for me by showing the intellectual side of the religion, and supporting buddhist practices and ways of life with western psychological findings.
    it was also interesting as it was written for westerners so it's easier for people who aren't that into Buddhism yet to learn about the mentality or Tibetan Buddhism.

    2. Zen Flesh, Zen Bones

    - It's an anthology of a few books, two of which I found most interesting being a collection of 101 tales of real encounters and happening in the lives of Buddhists. It also has a bunch of koans from a text called "The Gateless Gate". If you're a not a Zen Buddhist though it's kind of moot, as even the tales section mostly are koan-like riddle stories, though some are quite lighthearted and humerous.

    ... Thoere are many more I've read, but these two stuck with me, especially the first one, mainly because it has the ideas but not a lot of the terminology, and thus it was very easy to understand without knowing anything else on the subject. The closest he gets to talking about Buddhism is when he is asked how he handles certain things and he explains his personal practices a bit and his training.
  • edited July 2010
    I think this book has a lot of merit for newcomers to Buddha's teaching:

    http://www.pariyatti.org/Bookstore/productdetails.cfm?PC=742


    Also Cultivating Inner Peace by Paul Fleischman:

    http://www.pariyatti.org/Bookstore/productdetails.cfm?PC=566
  • edited July 2010
    I am reading Eight steps to happiness by Geshe Kelsang Gyatso. It is a book for beginners with an uncomplicated explanation to the Buddhist way of thinking!
  • edited July 2010
    I found a book "The Quantum and the Lotus" writen by Ricard Mathieu, an American scientist who became a Tibetan monk and lives in a Tibet monastery...it's theme is that focus on seeking knowledge only from the outer world leads to personal suffering and/or downright neglect of ethics. It becomes a very good intro to Buddhism for the beginner. Good read. Not onerous. Be well.
  • edited July 2010
    Looking for a good book about Metta meditation
  • mugzymugzy Veteran
    edited July 2010
    Here are some books and sutras I consider essential to my studies and understanding of Buddhism:
    The Way of the Bodhisattva by Shantideva

    The Jewel Ornament of Liberation by Gampopa

    The Words of my Perfect Teacher by Patrul Rinpoche

    Training the Mind and Cultivating Loving-Kindness by Chögyam Trungpa

    Living Buddha, Living Christ by Thich Nhat Hanh

    You Are the Eyes of the World by Longchenpa

    The Supreme Source by Chögyal Namkhai Norbu

    Mind Beyond Death
    by Dzogchen Ponlop

    The Lotus Sutra translated by Reeves

    The Arya Sanghata Sutra translated by Ven. Lhundup Damcho

    The Heart Sutra (various translations)
  • edited July 2010
    Hi all,

    If you are interested in browsing and buying books and films on Buddhism, please visit my Amazon-affiliated website below. We donate 20% of our profits to Buddhist temples.

    http://www.JhanaCompany.com

    Thank you and may you be well and happy! :)

    With metta,
    Dennis
  • edited August 2010
    Here is a book I found by accident in a hotel room in Monterey, California 5 years ago and haven't put it down since. It has been an incredibly inspiring and informative resource for me, and is very easy to read. I very much recommend it and believe it is available for free (unless you happen to pick up a copy in your hotel). It is published and distributed primarily to hotels around the world by the Bukkyo Dendo Kyokai, which is like a Japanese Buddhist version of the Gideons. This book gave me my first real glimpse at Buddhism (Mahayana) and I haven't stopped searching as a result.

    The Teaching of Buddha, Edited by Dr. Yehan Numata

    http://www.bdkamerica.org/default.aspx?MPID=53

    (This is from the website: The Teaching of Buddha is a collection of writings on the essence of Buddhism, selected and edited from the vast Buddhist canon, presented in a concise, easy-to-read, and nonsectarian format. It also includes a brief history of Buddhism, a listing of the source texts, a glossary of Sanskrit terms, and an index.)
  • edited August 2010
    "let go"
    by martine batchelor

    it went WAY beyond my expectations.
  • edited August 2010
    I know I'm probably passing over many in this thread but my eyes hurt and I don't feel like reading through all five pages. Could anyone help me find e-books that are really good? I have many of the "boring exact translation" type of books mentioned in the first post, but only one or two that are actually engaging. I don't have much money so I can't go out and buy books very often. I'm planning on looking up some Thich Nhat Hanh PDFs after i post this but i was hoping for some links to high rated books.

    I would like to recommend a book though, as I find the way they word things to be quite interesting. "the Pocket Buddha Reader" by Anne Bancroft has a lot of quotes from a lot of books and famous Buddhists complied into these sections: awakening, love, clarity, body and mind, contemplation, sorrow, truth, life and death, time and infinity, wisdom, and self and society. Right now I'm on truth. I've gotten some really great quotes out of this book, and I'm not even done :)


    EDIT: I'm aware of buddhanet.net though
    If you aren't you should definitely look through it, they have a LOT of books (I just haven't looked through all of them yet)
  • edited August 2010
    Here's a good one. Plenty to keep you busy

    http://www.buddhistelibrary.org/cpg1420/index.php?cat=3
  • edited August 2010
    Well... I've just finished reading a book... Buddhism Without Beliefs.
    I thought it were very helpful
  • AllbuddhaBoundAllbuddhaBound Veteran
    edited August 2010
    Glow wrote: »
    I just found a book called The Mindful Path to Self Compassion by Christopher K. Germer. Has anyone read this? I've read the few few chapters and some random sections throughout the book and am very impressed by what I'm seeing. The book is essentially an introduction to mindfulness as well as the Four Limitless Qualities meditations in the context of modern Western life. I actually like this better than Sharon Salzberg's Lovingkindness: The Revolutionary Art of Happiness because it more clearly outlines the possible directions one might go in while practicing these meditations and it incorporates recent research in psychology and neuroscience (and includes some cute little cartoons, lol). Germer's explanations of these meditations are also very clear and straightforward.

    The cover and title looked similar to The mindful Way through Depression which I read about a year and a half ago and found extremely helpful.

    I have Germer's book and not quite finished with it. I too have been very impressed with his approach. It really puts the concept of self compassion in perspective for me. It opens my eyes to so many possibilities.

    Great recommendation.
  • edited August 2010
    BenIsAWay wrote: »
    Here's a good one. Plenty to keep you busy

    http://www.buddhistelibrary.org/cpg1420/index.php?cat=3
    Thank you for the link, sir.
  • edited August 2010
    Shawn M. wrote: »
    Thank you for the link, sir.


    Enjoy. The meditation stuff on that site looks interesting as well.

    There is a free pdf book I found called "Eightfold Path for the Householder" by Jack Kornfield that I am getting started on. I truly want to learn to apply the principles of my discoveries to my every day life. Otherwise, what good is it all?

    I've also noticed that there is a wealth of instruction available for Meditation on Youtube.

    http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=so+ham&aq=f
  • lightwithinlightwithin Veteran
    edited August 2010
    BenIsAWay wrote: »
    I truly want to learn to apply the principles of my discoveries to my every day life. Otherwise, what good is it all?

    I completely agree. What good is reading a site's full library of e-books or half of amazon.com's catalog on Buddhism, if you can't apply what you read to your every waking moment. I struggle in this area but I think meditating is having a deep effect on me whether I do much about it off the cushion or not.
  • edited August 2010
    I completely agree. What good is reading a site's full library of e-books or half of amazon.com's catalog on Buddhism, if you can't apply what you read to your every waking moment. I struggle in this area but I think meditating is having a deep effect on me whether I do much about it off the cushion or not.

    :) I see meditation, study, affirmation, prayer, gratitude, all of it, as practice for the real thing. Life.

    In fact, all this is practice. When the Big Game comes, it's impossible to predict or control all the things that can go right or wrong. But what we are all doing here will certainly help us be ready and able to respond more fittingly when they do (and even better, this practice will help us to have a more fitting perception of those circumstances). Maybe this a subject for another thread, but it's nice to have a reminder in an unexpected place, sometimes.
  • edited August 2010
    Well I must learn the teachings before I can practice them. I have no teacher as of yet so the best I have is books; and the best books I have are ebooks as my library has a huge lack of Buddhist texts and I have no money.

    Would anyone happen to know where to get an ebook/PDF of the Pali Canon in enlglish? I would love it if it was downloadable, and of course free :)
  • edited August 2010
    Shawn M. wrote: »
    Well I must learn the teachings before I can practice them. I have no teacher as of yet so the best I have is books; and the best books I have are ebooks as my library has a huge lack of Buddhist texts and I have no money.

    Would anyone happen to know where to get an ebook/PDF of the Pali Canon in enlglish? I would love it if it was downloadable, and of course free :)
    Have you looked into the differences between the Theravada (Pali) and Mahayana schools (Sanskrit)? I'm learning now that being familiar with the basic differences is having a big impact on my approach and my expectations for what I find. This web page has what seems like a good comparison of the basics of the two: http://www.religioustolerance.org/budd_mah.htm

    It is my understanding that the Pali Canon is quite vast. It seems unlikely you'll be able to find it in a single volume. Looking into the Dhammapada, and various sutras might be a good starting point, if you are going for the original sources. You can find those on the link I provided.
  • edited August 2010
    BenIsAWay wrote: »
    Have you looked into the differences between the Theravada (Pali) and Mahayana schools (Sanskrit)? I'm learning now that being familiar with the basic differences is having a big impact on my approach and my expectations for what I find. This web page has what seems like a good comparison of the basics of the two: http://www.religioustolerance.org/budd_mah.htm

    It is my understanding that the Pali Canon is quite vast. It seems unlikely you'll be able to find it in a single volume. Looking into the Dhammapada, and various sutras might be a good starting point, if you are going for the original sources. You can find those on the link I provided.

    I actually haven't yet. I wanted to learn about Buddhism before learning about the sects so I don't become swayed towards the views of one and not the other. I shall take a look at that site though. (and let me know if you got the message I sent, it didn't confirm the send nor is it in my outbox)


    EDIT: I just read through that page and I can say I sway more towards Mahayana than Theravada though I can't say I'm either as I disagree with there being a "higher being".
  • edited August 2010
    Shawn M. wrote: »
    I just read through that page and I can say I sway more towards Mahayana than Theravada though I can't say I'm either as I disagree with there being a "higher being".

    It's quite a complicated topic really. I live in a Theravada country and find them to be very ritual oriented. A great deal of emphasis is placed on memorizing the original Pali texts, as well, though how much the average Thai really understands what they've memorized is another question. There is certainly a lot of prayer, and apparent "God" style worship as well, but there are a lot of other influences on spiritual beliefs in this country than just Buddhism as well.

    As far as learning and application to practical every day living, I have to say I'm swaying in the direction of Mahayana sources as well, but everything I learn I take in bits and pieces as it applies to my current understanding, saving some stuff for future consideration.

    Here is one for the Recommended Reading list, in PDF Format available for free download. Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind by Shunryu Suzuki

    http://storage.worldispnetwork.com/books/zen_mind_beginners_mind.pdf
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