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how to practise Buddha's Teaching in day-today life

Thank you Brian and thank you members of the forum
this is my last OP

A thought occured to me after the meditation of the last night to share the experience with you all

Whether you read this further or not, whether you think there is a point in these writing or not, whether you try to see it for yourself or not, i consider it is my duty to let you know
you may be a veteran or new comer to Buddha's Teaching
However i start from the ground, so veterans have to tolerate

As you know already our world consists of the 'things' we know
that knowlege we have got through our six sense bases
suppose you never heard a fruit called 'Dodan', now you know there is a fruit called 'Dodan'
since the eye contacted the above line on the screen, now you know there is a fruit called 'Dodan' and your world is expanded with the word 'Dodan' and the knowledge of the fruit called 'Dodan'
but still you do not know the shape or the colour of until someone or i expain or show it to you
you do not know the smell or the taste of it or how it feels
before you read about 'Dodan', it wasn't in your world
this is the same with 'everything' in our world

You can test this yourself
what can you see around you: wall, chair, bus, car, man, woman, dog, cat etc.
what can you hear around you: a door bang, a bird chirp, a man singing, a woman talk, a dog bark etc.
similarly about smell, taste, and feel

Whenever eye cantact an object, eye doesn't say the name of the object or the object doesn't say the name of it or the name isn't written on the object
If so how can we know the name of the object at the moment we see or hear or smell or taste or feel?
Test this yourself several times and try to grasp what these writing trying to cionvince
by doing so you can get the point
if i give the answer here it would be another knowledge in your world
it is like you look at the finger instead of looking at the moon

If you need any clarification you can PM me, and we can discuss with according to your understanding
use the eye, ear, nose, tongue, and body to test

the writing so far is for the beginners to Buddha's Teaching
I come back for those who know (experience) these things already in this point of view

Comments

  • ShoshinShoshin No one in particular Nowhere Special Veteran

    @upekka

    Are you referring to this....

    "Awareness is fundamentally non-conceptual-before thinking splits experience into subject and object. It is empty and so can contain everything, including thought. It is boundless. And amazingly, it is intrinsically knowing !"

    Bunkseggsavior
  • pegembarapegembara Veteran
    edited March 9

    Whenever eye cantact an object, eye doesn't say the name of the object or the object doesn't say the name of it or the name isn't written on the object
    If so how can we know the name of the object at the moment we see or hear or smell or taste or feel?

    This we learned. We attached labels(nama) to appearances(rupa).

    lobster
  • lobsterlobster Veteran

    In the Shingon closed fist teachings, which the Shakyamuni Buddha did not endorse, kanji are points of focus.

    I did this for a while with English letters, which was interesting ... However I feel the focus/concentration/attention was more useful than esoteric letter revelations ...

  • namarupanamarupa Veteran

    Why is this your last OP @upekka?

  • upekkaupekka Veteran
    edited March 9

    @Shoshin said:
    @upekka

    Are you referring to this....

    "Awareness is fundamentally non-conceptual-before thinking splits experience into subject and object. It is empty and so can contain everything, including thought. It is boundless. And amazingly, it is intrinsically knowing !"

    if you practise 'the mindfulness of the body' there couldn't be any doubt

    @lobster said:

    In the Shingon closed fist teachings, which the Shakyamuni Buddha did not endorse, kanji are points of focus.

    I did this for a while with English letters, which was interesting ... However I feel the focus/concentration/attention was more useful than esoteric letter revelations ...

    do you know that you were practising 'the mindfulness of the body'?

    @namarupa said:
    Why is this your last OP @upekka?

    because after write what needed to be written in this thread there is nothing important in this world to be written

    thanks for the side support

    STEP TWO

    unless you have tried the first part of this thread and got the point stressed by it, it is useless to read the following
    just reading without trying the first part, you can add something to your knowledge (expand your world) but you never know what really is happening around you and within you

    Buddha says
    when eye contact any object just use the word 'form'
    ex: chair = form, man = form, building = form, flower = form etc.
    (there are uncountable number of objects we know and we want to reduce it to one word because then we can handle the things that we see during the meditation, we can gain the control of the things we see)

    when ear contact any object just use the word 'sound'
    ex: a dog bark = sound, a child cry = sound, a man sing = sound etc.

    when nose contact any smell just use the word 'smell'
    when tongue contact any taste just use the word 'taste'
    when body contact any object just use the word 'feeling'
    when there is a thought arise in the mind just use the word 'thought'

    you can test the reality of form, sound, smell etc. during the sitting meditation
    in sitting meditation there are three Right Attention (yoniso manasikara)
    **
    First Right Attention** FRA
    when sitting meditation we have closed eyes, and closed mouth so there is no form or taste arises
    you pay attention to five items namely sound, feeling, thought, inhale (in-breath) and exhale (out-breath)
    memorise these five items several times in order to bring them up instead of uncountable names of what we have seen, heard, smelt, tasted, felt before whenever there is an experience arises through six sense bases

    Second Right Attention SRA
    now the meditation starts
    you do not do anything during the meditation but just wait and see what happens (no thinking of what you have read or heard about Buddha's Teaching or anything), just pay attention to whatever arises in the moment

    whatever happens just know it
    if sound arises just know it
    if feeling arises just know it
    if thought arises just know it
    if inhale arises just know it
    if exhale arises just know it
    **
    Third Right Attention** TRA
    after the meditation- second right attention- spend few minutes to remind what has happened during the meditation
    ex: say there was a sound of a dog bark
    how did you noticed it?
    as 'dog bark' or as 'sound'?

    say there was a thought of a friend
    how did you notice it?
    as 'friend' or as 'thought'?

    if TRA says you noticed as 'dog bark', 'friend', that means you need to increase FRA before start SRA
    for beginners, if you going to sit for 30 minutes, it is worth to do FRA for 20 minutes and do SRA for 10 mits
    checking the SRA at TRA, you can reduce FRA and increase SRA gradually

    Remember you don't do anything during the SRA but just sit, observe and know what is happening at the moment
    whenever you are successful you are 'here and now' and you yourself know it
    this is called 'sandhittiko, akaliko, ehipassiko', the three first characteristics of Buddha's Teaching
    if you could achieve this for one thought moment, that would be worth than for your whole life
    you would know it by yourself by degrees, nobody has to explain it to you

    at TRA, if you see when there was a sound during the SRA you noticed it as 'sound', feeling as feeling, thought as thought, inhale as inhale, exhale as exhale
    then the SECOND STEP is completed

    THIRD STEP
    during the meditation (SRA) when a sound arises how do you know it is 'sound', but not 'thought' or 'feeling' or 'inhale' or 'exhale'?
    from where does the word 'sound' come from?
    can you hear it through your ear?
    can you see it in your mind?

    try to answer to these questions
    it needs several meditation sessions

    if there is anything to clarify of this post after trying just PM me
    i will come back after sometime when i know the time is right

    IF you really make an effort to do this simple task you will be practising four frame of references (mindfulness of body, feeling, mind and mental qualities)
    by doiing so you develop four bases of power, two exertions- extertion to guard the faculties (eye, ear etc.), exertion to abandon unskilful qualities such as thought of sensuality, ill-will, and violence
    in other words you are practsing 10 factors out of 37 factors to awakening

    the five faculties (faith, effort, mindfulness, concentration and wisdom) will be culminated by this practice
    that means, you will be achieved the first stage of enlightenment where you know what is self-view, what is rights and rituals, what is doubt

    then you have firmed confidence in Buddha, Buddha's Teaching (Dhamma) and Buddha's disciples (Sangha) because you yourself become a Noble Disciple

    namarupa
  • CoryCory Tennessee Veteran

    I'm a young guy, so I know for me, The Buddha Walks Into a Bar: A Guide to Life for a New Generation, is a great book for applying Buddhism and mindfulness into every day life.

  • lobsterlobster Veteran

    do you know that you were practising 'the mindfulness of the body'?

    What we think we are doing and what is actually useful may be very different. So for example a big part of our training was meditation as movement. Kata movements (martial arts) were classed as mudra or asana and the idea was to keep the body active/occupied and the mind still.

    The kanji meditations was not something I practiced for very long. Just went through the English alphabet one per day. Hardly extensive. Once I joined the Shingon group, I was provided with manuals, I was very much left to apply the teachings in my own way, with the 'exoteric' teachings being yoga and martial arts.

  • LionduckLionduck Veteran

    Folks can give you reams of material on how to practice Buddha's teachings day-to-day.
    But I think that it all really comes down to a few basic actions.

    Do your best to:
    Be honest (to yourself and to others)
    Respect (love) yourself
    Respect (love) others
    Respect (love) your environment (nature)

    Don't feel guilty if you occasionally muck it up.
    That is called living.

    Peace to all

    lobster
  • lobsterlobster Veteran

    Outstanding @Lionduck <3

    Many thanks. Always good to hear the basic teachings expressed simply and inspirationally. B)

  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Moderator
    edited March 11

    @upekka said: because after write what needed to be written in this thread there is nothing important in this world to be written

    Yeah, but you did make it quite verbose....

    Brevity speaks volumes.

  • @upekka said:

    THIRD STEP
    during the meditation (SRA) when a sound arises how do you know it is 'sound', but not 'thought' or 'feeling' or 'inhale' or 'exhale'?
    from where does the word 'sound' come from?
    can you hear it through your ear?
    can you see it in your mind?

    When you are focused deep enough, there is just an experience. It isn't even identified or perceived as sound, touch or heat. The idea of sound entering the ear comes from thinking.

    Bare phenomenon(sankhara) arising and passing away.

    But to do this in day-to-day life ........

  • upekkaupekka Veteran

    @pegembara said:

    @upekka said:

    THIRD STEP
    during the meditation (SRA) when a sound arises how do you know it is 'sound', but not 'thought' or 'feeling' or 'inhale' or 'exhale'?
    from where does the word 'sound' come from?
    can you hear it through your ear?
    can you see it in your mind?

    When you are focused deep enough, there is just an experience. It isn't even identified or perceived as sound, touch or heat. The idea of sound entering the ear comes from thinking.

    if you know this for yourself you are on the right track
    if this is what you have heard or read, then you have to use your own six sense bases and check whether it is correct

    Bare phenomenon(sankhara) arising and passing away.

    we have heard this and have read this
    but how do you know this is true
    there should be a way to know this is true
    what is your experience to say this is the case

    But to do this in day-to-day life ........

    just this can be done by few sitting meditation session, say two or three sitting meditation sessions by applying the experience gained to day-to-day events
    if we know what to do it is not a big deal

    (what the problem with us was/is we do not know what is need to be done)

    @federica said:

    @upekka said: because after write what needed to be written in this thread there is nothing important in this world to be written

    Yeah, but you did make it quite verbose....

    english is not my mother tongue

    Brevity speaks volumes.

    for the people whose mother tongue is as same as the used language

  • dhammachickdhammachick crazy Aussie BUJU Sydney, Australia Veteran

    I sense some hostility in this thread.......

  • upekkaupekka Veteran

    @dhammachick said:
    I sense some hostility in this thread.......

    very good
    you come to the right track instantly
    check again and see how did you get that sense

  • The most important advice in day to day life - Learn to take a step back and ask what is really going on from a 3rd person perspective.

    lobster
  • lobsterlobster Veteran

    ^^. Good advice @pegembara
    Even though this seems like creating a 'dualistic mindset', it is in fact a skilful training method towards Truth and objectivity.

    The little 'i' aka lobster/pegembara/gotama etc is fragile, easily effected, influenced, lizard brain, monkey minded. Pah!

    The luminous mind/Buddha Nature/Real Being etc. is above such petty attachments. Free, open, spacious ...
    http://tinybuddha.com/blog/letting-go-of-attachment-from-a-to-zen/

    pegembara
  • federicafederica seeker of the clear blue sky Moderator

    For someone who said that was going to be his last post (which is actually a bit melodramatic, and not encouraged on this forum), it seems you had more to add.

    @upekka, you will find that generally speaking, when members, in any forum, on any topic, come across a great wall of text, many will respond with a "tl; dr".
    When you speak to people, lecture them, instruct verbally, or hold monologue, people will listen and digest as you go.
    In writing, brevity - on a forum - is far better tool to get your point across.

    And you're "preaching to the choir" here.
    As you're not a native English speaker, I'll explain: that means that you're giving lessons to people who may not need them, and already understand and know what you're preaching.
    Which is actually somewhat patronising and rude, in some people's minds.

    upekka
  • SpinyNormanSpinyNorman It's still all old bollocks Veteran

    @upekka said:> You can test this yourself
    what can you see around you: wall, chair, bus, car, man, woman, dog, cat etc.
    what can you hear around you: a door bang, a bird chirp, a man singing, a woman talk, a dog bark etc.
    similarly about smell, taste, and feel

    Basically you seem to be describing the first two enlightenment factors, mindfulness and investigation? It's what I focus on, though for me it's a challenge to maintain mindfulness throughout the day - do you have any advice on that?

  • upekkaupekka Veteran
    edited March 12

    @federica said:
    For someone who said that was going to be his last post (which is actually a bit melodramatic, and not encouraged on this forum), it seems you had more to add.

    @upekka, you will find that generally speaking, when members, in any forum, on any topic, come across a great wall of text, many will respond with a "tl; dr".
    When you speak to people, lecture them, instruct verbally, or hold monologue, people will listen and digest as you go.
    In writing, brevity - on a forum - is far better tool to get your point across.

    And you're "preaching to the choir" here.
    As you're not a native English speaker, I'll explain: that means that you're giving lessons to people who may not need them, and already understand and know what you're preaching.
    Which is actually somewhat patronising and rude, in some people's minds.

    thanks for your clarification

    by saying 'this is my last OP' i meant i do not start any new thread here after
    but that doesn't mean i am not going to contribute to other threads
    see, seeing is deceiving
    that is what i wanted to stress in this thread

    @SpinyNorman said:

    @upekka said:> You can test this yourself
    what can you see around you: wall, chair, bus, car, man, woman, dog, cat etc.
    what can you hear around you: a door bang, a bird chirp, a man singing, a woman talk, a dog bark etc.
    similarly about smell, taste, and feel

    Basically you seem to be describing the first two enlightenment factors, mindfulness and investigation?

    this is practising mindfulness of body, first effort-effort to guard the six faculties, second effort-effort to abandon arisen unskillful thoughts of sensuality, ill-will and violence (what we do is creating the cause)
    by doing so the first two enlightenment factors are being developed (what happens is the effect)

    It's what I focus on, though for me it's a challenge to maintain mindfulness throughout the day

    by reading your other posts, it is obvious that you have been doing this for a long time,

    • do you have any advice on that?

    there is nothing new other than what you have been doing

    just do the same thing you have been doing (do FRA several time before sitting meditation-SRA, and do TRA for few minutes and make a mental note what should be included in FRA before next sitting meditation and do the renewed FRA several time before next SRA)

    since you prefer walking include in FRA: left, right (instead of in-breath, out-breath), form, sound, smell, feeling and thought several times before start walking

    in your case there is no doubt few sittings of meditation and few walkings of meditation would make this practice is SRA your habit

    once it is become a habit you need not to make an effort to be mindful, your mindfulness is with whatever you do (eating, taking shower etc.) during the day

    however this is not the end
    if you could completed the second step then go for Third step

    by this time your efforts, mindfulness, concentration and wisdom has been developed to a certain level

    once third step completed your Five Faculties of Enlightenment factors are developed
    you yourself know your level
    you don't need any one to tell you where you stand (Level, Stage)
    if you feel like discussing further we can go from there

  • upekkaupekka Veteran
    edited March 21

    are perceptions simmered down now?
    are you enjoying jhana now?
    if so you can go to the next step to have 'dhamma understadning'

    do you have any problem to identify in which jhana you are?
    listen to a relevant dhamma talk with regard to jhana or talk to a monk who knows about jhana or read a book which talk about jhana
    and
    do the meditation again (here what you have to do the same meditation you have been doing)

    dhamma reveals itself

  • upekkaupekka Veteran

    anyone who experiencing jhana, could you tell us the difference between jhana and movement of elements?
    or
    similarities?
    thanks in advance

  • SpinyNormanSpinyNorman It's still all old bollocks Veteran

    @upekka said:
    anyone who experiencing jhana, could you tell us the difference between jhana and movement of elements?
    or
    similarities?
    thanks in advance

    To put it crudely, I would associate jhana with the quality of samatha, and awareness of the movement of elements with vipassana.

  • upekkaupekka Veteran

    @SpinyNorman said:

    To put it crudely, I would associate jhana with the quality of samatha, and awareness of the movement of elements with vipassana.

    do you experience (have awareness) of the movement of elements when you are in First jhana? in 2nd jhana? in 3rd jhana? or in 4th jhana?

    how do you explain the movement with elements?

    clue: body consists of four elements
    our body feel the movements of elements
    how do you express this feeling?

    all these questions are for you to probe deeper and deeper within you
    which in turn reveal dhamma

    if dhamma reveal itself just share it with others

    if questions arised during meditation share them with others

    even though there is only one TRUTH different people see it differently
    sharing experience would help others

    thanks @SpinyNorman

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