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lobster Veteran

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  • Re: Drunken on happiness

    If our search for liberation is motivated from despair, disquiet and agitation. Overcoming negativity will be our primary motivation. If we are motivated by bliss, euphoria, happiness and spiritual intoxication, then is that our likely desire impediment?

    We have a start point and a chance from the Middle Way. If we are running from or to, we are still greedy for cessation of dukkha or greedy for practice with benefits. Spiritual hamsters on wheels of our preference and karmic unfoldment ... Do we need balance and spare, clear capacity?

    Spiritual intoxication? Just another knot?

    Fearless and honest introspection will soon reveal the core defects of the human condition; this is the noble truth of suffering. The mind and body are riddled with stumbling blocks, choke points, nodes of tension, knots of pain, and a veritable fountainhead of selfish, hurtful and deluded psychological stuff. The mind’s capacity for awareness, the “knowing” that arises and passes away, drop by drop in the stream of consciousness, is constantly hindered, fettered, intoxicated and polluted by such internal defilements. The enterprise of organic spirituality is to untangle these tangles, to untie these knots, to unbind the mind—moment by moment, breath by breath—from the imprisoning net of unwholesome and unhealthy manifestations. The reward for a life of careful inner cultivation is the liberation of the mind through wisdom—a remarkable transformation of the mind that awakens it to its full potential of awareness without obstruction or limitation.
    https://www.bcbsdharma.org/article/an-organic-spirituality/

    DhammaDragon
  • Re: Blog

    Thanks everyone for sharing. <3
    The mantras were written about 10 years go. Some of course are a lot older. <3

    As others mention, blogs, diaries and journals are a way of unfolding and getting to know ourself. A form of therapy or reflection of our knowing.

    @genkaku can write - convey ideas.
    @dhammachick wrote about her pagan roots and sham shaman. Tee hee.

    Everyone has a story. Has insight. Has knowledge.

    @Jayasara our resident monk has recently moved into a more natural form of mindfulness
    https://bhikkhujayasara.wordpress.com/author/bhikkhujayasara/

    Greg 'Gandalf' Wonderwheel who inspired this thread, is an interesting and knowledgeable/experienced practitioner.

    Find a lama or zennith, monk or teacher who blogs regularly and resonates and inspires and learn ... Skilfull possibility? I think so ...

    DhammaDragonLonely_Traveller
  • Blog

    I was very pleased to see that Gandalf has his own Blog
    http://wonderwheels.blogspot.co.uk

    It made me seek out my lost ramblings, which are slowly dissolving into cloud dust ...
    Found this page ...
    https://tinyurl.com/ll9zkcq

    Do you have a blog?

    Dhammika
  • Re: yearning for god

    Agreed @Kerome well said. B)

    Bodhisattvas have hope. Buddhas are hopeless? :o In a sense once persuaded by his inner beings that transmission of Dharma was possible, the Buddha moved from Nihilism (job done - die and dissolve) to the higher stage of limiting the absolute. ;)

    The Bodhissatva vow:
    May I attain Buddhahood for the benefit of all sentient beings.
    Beings are numberless, I vow to save them
    Desires are inexhaustible, I vow to end them
    Dharma gates are boundless, I vow to enter them
    Buddha's way is unsurpassable, I vow to become it.

    Yep Bodhisattva is the stage AFTER selfish absolute awakening in my experience. So there! :p
    Wrong again? Tsk, tsk when will I ever learn ...

    DhammaDragon
  • Re: Pain, ego

    I don't like pain of any description

    And yet you do quite extreme running . . . :p

    One of the most extraordinary behavour patterns is how we cling to our pain/dukkha, our Buddhas, our sardine tin collection :3 our egoic affiliations etc.

    Then like the Buddha who was starving him silly with a group of spiritual poseurs (sorry Shakyamuni - but you know you were) we change our pattern.

    What do we need to do? Not how extreme is our sitting, how big our book/experiences collection. No. What will change us for real. Walk the talk.

    @Shoshin posted an excellent thread on the 8 fold path. It may be commitment to a cushion, teacher/sangha/mantra/yidam internal commitment etc.

    Here we go. Plan:
    I take refuge in the three jewels.

    Do we allow the pain to destroy the ego, then?

    ... Ay caramba - destroy the ego? . . . who is going to look after the family, eat the fish :3 post to NewBuddhist, be kind to the enlightened etc ...

    Skilful means ... skilful . . .

    Tosh