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Now China wants back the Golden Buddha statue with monk's remains inside

Comments

  • CinorjerCinorjer Veteran Veteran

    Interesting. Points out the thriving underground market for antiquities. I didn't realize it was on loan from a private collector, who did offer to return it "if China can prove it was stolen". Just think of all the great treasure that will never be seen, in the private collections of rich people who know better than to let anyone but their close friends see it.

  • ShoshinShoshin No one in particular Nowhere Special Veteran

    Yes it is fascinating and if it was brought to an area near where I live, curiosity would perhaps get the better of me and I might go to see it...

    But it is somewhat ironic when thinking of the Buddhist ultimate concept of the impermanent nature of all things then they go and mummify a monk, in order to 'preserve" him for what ? An object of "Curiosity" ...

    Still it's an interesting story all the same.... :)

    Cinorjer
  • vinlynvinlyn Veteran Colorado...for now Veteran

    @Cinorjer said:
    Interesting. Points out the thriving underground market for antiquities. I didn't realize it was on loan from a private collector, who did offer to return it "if China can prove it was stolen". Just think of all the great treasure that will never be seen, in the private collections of rich people who know better than to let anyone but their close friends see it.

    Yes, that is a problem. But so is the lack of preservation of antiquities by public sources who have a limited amount of money. It's a difficult issue.

  • vinlynvinlyn Veteran Colorado...for now Veteran

    @Shoshin said:
    Yes it is fascinating and if it was brought to an area near where I live, curiosity would perhaps get the better of me and I might go to see it...

    But it is somewhat ironic when thinking of the Buddhist ultimate concept of the impermanent nature of all things then they go and mummify a monk, in order to 'preserve" him for what ? An object of "Curiosity" ...

    Still it's an interesting story all the same.... :)

    Interesting point. I hadn't thought of that.

  • howhow Veteran Veteran

    @Shoshin said:
    Yes it is fascinating and if it was brought to an area near where I live, curiosity would perhaps get the better of me and I might go to see it...

    But it is somewhat ironic when thinking of the Buddhist ultimate concept of the impermanent nature of all things then they go and mummify a monk, in order to 'preserve" him for what ? An object of "Curiosity" ...

    Still it's an interesting story all the same.... :)

    In ch'an temples in China they are called meat bodies. Often a founder or monk of renown. Usually a mummy without the encasing statue. The fact they don't decay is presented as proof of their holiness.

    From the view of my zafu it looks like ....a bizarre devotional ornamentation that obscures the simplicity of the Buddha's teachings.

    ShoshinCinorjer
  • EarthninjaEarthninja Wanderer West Australia Veteran
    Buddhism has been around for thousands of years. Our interpretation of the teachings could be vastly different to others. :)
    We can look back at history and think, why the hell did they do that?
    But that being sense I am sure it made perfect sense to them.
    Including the mummification.

    2000 years from now people are going to look back at our life's and think the same thing!

    Their Buddhism will be different from ours. I mean sitting on a zafu in meditation? Why the hell would we do that?
    Haha.

    Interesting article vinlyn!
  • HamsakaHamsaka goosewhisperer Polishing the 'just so' Veteran

    My first thought about this article went to the 'tussle' between China and HHDL that occurred after HHDL mentioned me might not return for a fifteenth incarnation. China was incensed because that meant they couldn't plan on a future tool of control over captive Tibet.

    So I thought China sought to keep the mummified monk in case he ended his meditation outside their immediate control.

    Rowan1980boobysattva
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