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The Four Noble Truths

edited February 2010 in Buddhism Basics
The Four Noble Truths

"The number of funds universe. The four spheres of mind, the four applicants to seek the wisdom, the wise "
( "The Seventh Wise", verse 4)

Siddarta Sakyamuni Gotama Buddha (538 BC) to 35 years after his enlightenment in Bodhgaya, enunciated the four noble truths and the eightfold path, thus founding the monastic order (Sangha) and then Buddhism.
The four noble truths:

1. "pain"
2. "The cause of pain"
3. "way that leads to the extinction of pain"
4. "condition for the absence of pain"

Shakyamuni Buddha meditating on these truths came to birth, sickness, old age, death and desire, an essential event of the human condition.
Pain - The birth is suffering, old age is suffering, sickness is pain, death is suffering, united with things not pleasant is suffering, separation from what one loves is suffering, the inability to satisfy their desires and pain .

The cause of suffering - the ignorance, greed (desire) and attachment are the roots of the pain that give life to the ego ( "I"). The 'I', by binding to the object of desire, determine the condition of pain.

The path that leads to the extinction of pain - Buddhism has indicated in the "righteousness" Eightfold Path the path that leads to the extinction of suffering:
Right Opinion
Right Thinking
Right Speech
Right Action
Right Life
Right Will
Right Attention
Right Concentration
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The study, direct knowledge, meditation, non-attachment, compassion are all vehicles that lead to the suspension of the 'I' and then the extinction of suffering.

Condition of absence of pain - and the disappearance and extinction of desire, the liberation and detachment from it. Anywhere in the world there are seemingly delightful and pleasant, there this craving may be abandoned, there may be extinct. This condition arise insight, wisdom, knowledge and clarity that allow the being to live the paradise within, "here and now.

http://www.paroleinutili.it/contStd.asp?lang=it&idPag=556

Comments

  • edited February 2010
    The Four Noble Truths

    "The number of funds universe. The four spheres of mind, the four applicants to seek the wisdom, the wise "
    ( "The Seventh Wise", verse 4)

    Siddarta Sakyamuni Gotama Buddha (538 BC) to 35 years after his enlightenment in Bodhgaya, enunciated the four noble truths and the eightfold path, thus founding the monastic order (Sangha) and then Buddhism.
    The four noble truths:

    1. "pain"
    2. "The cause of pain"
    3. "way that leads to the extinction of pain"
    4. "condition for the absence of pain"

    Shakyamuni Buddha meditating on these truths came to birth, sickness, old age, death and desire, an essential event of the human condition.
    Pain - The birth is suffering, old age is suffering, sickness is pain, death is suffering, united with things not pleasant is suffering, separation from what one loves is suffering, the inability to satisfy their desires and pain .

    The cause of suffering - the ignorance, greed (desire) and attachment are the roots of the pain that give life to the ego ( "I"). The 'I', by binding to the object of desire, determine the condition of pain.

    The path that leads to the extinction of pain - Buddhism has indicated in the "righteousness" Eightfold Path the path that leads to the extinction of suffering:
    Right Opinion
    Right thinking
    Right speech
    Right action
    Straight Life
    Will Line
    Attention Line
    Right Concentration

    The study, direct knowledge, meditation, non-attachment, compassion are all vehicles that lead to the suspension of the 'I' and then the extinction of suffering.

    Condition of absence of pain - and the disappearance and extinction of desire, the liberation and detachment from it. Anywhere in the world there are seemingly delightful and pleasant, there this craving may be abandoned, there may be extinct. This condition arise insight, wisdom, knowledge and clarity that allow the being to live the paradise within, "here and now.

    http://www.paroleinutili.it/contStd.asp?lang=it&idPag=556
    Are you sure the order of the 4 gospel truth 'of the Buddha and the know tell me why' someone fray?:)
  • edited February 2010
    Right Opinion
    Right thinking
    Right speech
    Right action
    Straight Life
    Will Line
    Attention Line
    Right Concentration

    That's a new "translation" to me:)

    I don't really see that "opinion" is the same as "view":)
  • edited February 2010
    ueshiba wrote: »
    Are you sure the order of the 4 gospel truth 'of the Buddha and the know tell me why' someone fray?:)

    In the past it was that the teaching was transmitted by hand with a possibility of error proportional to the freedom of sentient beings to understand.
    This happened in the transmission of the teaching of the Buddha's Four Noble Truths.
  • edited February 2010
    MatSalted wrote: »
    That's a new "translation" to me:)

    I don't really see that "opinion" is the same as "view":)

    The translations are always a problem try to be as precise as possible:

    Right Opinion
    Right Thinking
    Right Speech
    Right Action
    Right Life
    Right Will
    Right Attention
    Right Concentration
  • edited February 2010
    The translations are always a problem try to be as precise as possible:

    I guess my point is that "Right Opinion" is significantly different to "Right View"?

    Maybe you mean "having the opinion of the way things are that corresponds to the way things are"? That makes sense to a degree?

    :)

    Mat
  • federicafederica Seeker of the clear blue sky... Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator
    edited February 2010
    Opinion is your interpretation.
    the translation - which has been appropriate and suitable, and universally accepted by the majority so far - is View.
    Which is different to 'Opinion'.
    as an Italian, you may not see the subtlety in the difference.

    Opinion is Opinione.
    View is Considerazione.

    'Opinione' is strictly personal.
    'Considerazione' is a general appraisal, taking everything into account, impersonally.
    That - is Right VIEW.
  • ValtielValtiel Veteran
    edited February 2010
    Opinions are subjective. Right view has to do with knowing the truth of the origin and the cessation of suffering. The traditional translation is fine

    What do your alternate translations add?
  • edited February 2010
    Right view has to do with knowing the truth of the origin and the cessation of suffering.

    I think you can interpret it as being a wider, non anthropocentric, viewpoint of reality where suffering is just the "human and important" end of the heirachy of emergent phenomenon.
  • federicafederica Seeker of the clear blue sky... Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator
    edited February 2010
    ....And 'Thinking' is not 'Intention'.

    How you came to this conclusion is beyond the understanding of any translator or interpreter....!
  • federicafederica Seeker of the clear blue sky... Its better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak out and remove all doubt Moderator
    edited February 2010
    MatSalted wrote: »
    I think you can interpret it as being a wider, non anthropocentric, viewpoint of reality where suffering is just the "human and important" end of the heirachy of emergent phenomenon.

    If you could write this in English, it would help.
    we have enough problems trying to interpret Avalo's attempts at translating into English from the Italian....! :D
  • edited February 2010
    federica wrote: »
    If you could write this in English, it would help.
    we have enough problems trying to interpret Avalo's attempts at translating into English from the Italian....! :D

    LOL:) Point taken.

    Ok, some say that Buddha was just about human suffering and that is that, they circle that off an that is there dharma. In the important senses I agree with them, when he left the palace, that was clearly his mission.

    But that doesn't mean that human suffering is all that Dharma applies to. Dharma is universal, it is true before there were sufferers and it will be true of aliens and artificial life as much as it is true of all contingent systems.

    So when I say the anthropocentric view I mean just treating Dharma as about human suffering whereas some are interested in the wider philosophical notion of how dharma conditions experience, science and all emergent systems.

    In this case there are legitimate questions like

    Why is Dukka the true?
    Why is annica true?
    Why is dependent origination the true.
    Can we imagine possible universes without emptiness?
    Etc etc:)

    Note that these are not the "meaningless" philosophical questions the buddha rightly precludes from Dharma practices, these are questions that fall under the "science, wisdom and knowledge" domains rather than "pure experience":)

    Hope that makes more sense!:)

    Mat

    PS I recoded some videos on this today Im uploading now:)
  • ValtielValtiel Veteran
    edited February 2010
    Once again anicca and anatta apply to everything. When things are treated contrary to that reality them dukkha arises. Those things cannot be changed. But dukkha does not have to arise. Dukkha is what his teachings were concerned with and part of that is understanding to true nature of all things.
  • edited February 2010
    MatSalted wrote: »
    I guess my point is that "Right Opinion" is significantly different to "Right View"?

    Retta Volontà!


    p.s. come si traduce FEDERICA ????
  • edited February 2010
    federica wrote: »
    ....And 'Thinking' is not 'Intention'.

    How you came to this conclusion is beyond the understanding of any translator or interpreter....!

    Retto Pensiero!
  • edited February 2010
    Hi Avalokitesvara,

    I suggest that, in addition to the help you receive in this forum, you also join an Italian Buddhist forum to assist you with proper translations:

    http://buddhismoitalia.forumcommunity.net/?t=30585778

    With kind regards. :)
  • edited February 2010
    Once again anicca and anatta apply to everything. When things are treated contrary to that reality them dukkha arises. Those things cannot be changed. But dukkha does not have to arise. Dukkha is what his teachings were concerned with and part of that is understanding to true nature of all things.

    So you agree there is more to Dharma than the singularly subjective it seems:)
This discussion has been closed.