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Shambhala "Lineage"

edited December 2010 in Sanghas
Hi everyone... I am curious what everyone's opinion of the recently established Shambhala school of Vajrayana is.

Comments

  • edited November 2010
    meh.
  • edited November 2010
    meh.

    Heh, my opinion as well... There's a Shambhala retreat center here in Colorado I'd like to volunteer at though. But, when I asked the HR person there whether it would be possible for me to find a Nyingma guru and begin ngondro in the Nyingma tradition she said I'd need to begin Vajrayana Shambhala ngondro if I was to begin any sort of formal training with a teacher while staying at the center.

    But... I still feel that if I were to just volunteer there for a year or so without beginning ngondro of any sort; and simply work, study, and practice as I have been that it would be of good use to my development.

    Last night, I realized that my aspiration for this life is to become a Bodhisattva... That being said, I feel that being actively involved in any sangha organization would be of help to my development...

    I'm ready to begin my journey... I'm just having trouble with my compass :)
  • edited November 2010
    Personally I would not become involved with a Buddhist organisation which has a "King and Queen" of a mythical place in Tibet at its head, however attractive they look.
    Its a bit like if a couple announced that they were the descendents of King Arthur and his wife at Avalon and then started an organisation with the name 'Avalon'.

    http://www.shambhala.org/community/SakyongWangmo.php


    .
  • edited November 2010
    Here's my situation:

    I'm ready to begin ngondro, I'd like it to be of the nyingma tradition... I recently was forced out of my job by immense hour cuts and so as of yesterday I am unemployed...

    I've been looking into work-study programs (with room and board) offered by various retreat center across the US... The problem is that I need to have at least 150 dollars per month in order to continue paying my credit card bill...

    I don't have the money needed to travel very far to work at a retreat center... I truly and sincerely want to work and study at a retreat center as I feel that any sort of work I do at one of these centers will be much MUCH more fulfilling to me than the retail work I've been doing for the past few years... Not to mention quite essential to me in my aspiration to become a bodhisattva.

    Given my situation... perhaps someone here could give me a little advice? (of course, I am looking for another retail job to continue paying the bills until I find the right center)
  • edited November 2010
    Here's my situation:

    I'm ready to begin ngondro, I'd like it to be of the nyingma tradition... I recently was forced out of my job by immense hour cuts and so as of yesterday I am unemployed...

    I've been looking into work-study programs (with room and board) offered by various retreat center across the US... The problem is that I need to have at least 150 dollars per month in order to continue paying my credit card bill...

    I don't have the money needed to travel very far to work at a retreat center... I truly and sincerely want to work and study at a retreat center as I feel that any sort of work I do at one of these centers will be much MUCH more fulfilling to me than the retail work I've been doing for the past few years... Not to mention quite essential to me in my aspiration to become a bodhisattva.

    Given my situation... perhaps someone here could give me a little advice? (of course, I am looking for another retail job to continue paying the bills until I find the right center)

    Hi RMurray,
    Send me a pm.
    I'm sure we can figure something out for you.
    sn
  • edited November 2010
    My cult senses are flaming.
  • edited November 2010
    I've gone over my "assets" and figured that if I were to sell everything I own I could do a work study for about 12 months that didn't include any sort of stipend... *shrug* but that's assuming that the center is somewhere that someone I know would be willing to drive me to...
  • JeffreyJeffrey Veteran
    edited November 2010
    We've had a thread about this in the last 2 months. Its not a cult. But its a little funky. Read some of Trungpa's books.
  • BrigidBrigid Veteran
    edited November 2010
    I follow the Thai Forest Tradition but Chogyam Trungpa's teachings really helped me in many areas (especially for panic disorder) and I still read Pema Chodron because she teaches me a lot too. I have a warm spot for the Shambhala tradition. Not all of it, but some.
  • edited November 2010
    I love Pema Chodron too, but I've got my reservations about the lineage.
  • CinorjerCinorjer Veteran
    edited November 2010
    The inheritance of the spiritual leadership from father to son makes me very concerned about the people who run the organization. However, I don't know enough about even standard Tibetan Buddhism to say if that is considered unusual.
  • JeffreyJeffrey Veteran
    edited November 2010
    Pema Chodron is not of shambala lineage. I think she is of Karma Kagyu lineage iirc http://www.kagyu.org/kagyulineage/teachers/ You can see her picture on that link. I'm not sure what exactly the lineage is with shambala. It may point to Trungpa but I don't think the Karmapa oversees them though I could be wrong. The Karmapa oversaw Trungpa.
  • edited November 2010
    Shambhala is a "new lineage" consisting of kagyu and nyingma if I remember right...
  • edited November 2010
    Shambhala is a "new lineage" consisting of kagyu and nyingma if I remember right...
    The line of Trungpa Rinpoche's comes from Zurmang monastery which was founded by a Karmapa, I cant remember which one right off hand but I'm sure you can look it up.
    Trungpa revealed some terma which became the foundation of the Shambhala lineage as it is today. Terma are a Nyingma phenomena but lineage crossover is not unusual.
    So it is currently its own lineage with roots/ties to the Nyingma and Karma Kagyu lineages.
  • edited November 2010
    Dear Rmurray1985,

    I would suggest that you look into Tarthang Tulku's center for resident study:

    http://www.nyingmainstitute.com/page/residential-volunteer

    They provide a small stipend and I am sure they would have no problem with you doing Nyingma ngondro.
    :-)

    Another thing to think about is that most credit card companies will accept settlements for outstanding balances that can be much lower than the total amount owing. Given that you lost your job, it is worth exploring that if you can make a single lump sum.
  • edited November 2010
    Like many posters here, I have greatly enjoyed Trungpa's works while being utterly repulsed by the Vajradhatu organization that he built with its 3-piece suits, Vajra guard and highly structured hierarchy. The Vajra Regent giving HIV to a couple of his students certainly didn't change my view either.

    I don't even know what to say about the current state of affairs, other than it seems that all of the old elements of the tradition including the ties to the Kargyu are being expunged. The large thangka of Vajradhara that the 16th Karmapa blessed is being taken down in Boulder and put into storage to make way for new images that focus on the Shambala kings. If there is one thing I am quite sure the West does not need, it is more preening monarchs. Maybe I am wrong, but it seems a lot of Trungpa's students are leaving.

    Visit: http://radiofreeshambala.org for the site that many old CTR devotees set up to discuss their distress at the recent changes. Also, read about what happened to Reginald Ray.

    I think this brings up an important point that some of our topics are skirting, maybe I will start a new thread: Can tulkus make mistakes? Do they ever screw up?

    Obviously, I think that they do. Now whether those mistakes also bring benefit is another interesting question. :-)
  • edited December 2010
    karmadorje wrote: »
    Dear Rmurray1985,

    I would suggest that you look into Tarthang Tulku's center for resident study:

    http://www.nyingmainstitute.com/page/residential-volunteer

    They provide a small stipend and I am sure they would have no problem with you doing Nyingma ngondro.
    :-)

    Another thing to think about is that most credit card companies will accept settlements for outstanding balances that can be much lower than the total amount owing. Given that you lost your job, it is worth exploring that if you can make a single lump sum.

    Thank you for that. The Nyingma Institute is what I've narrowed it down to at this point (The rural location in Sonoma County). My good friend and guide's girlfriend will most likely be joining that program soon as well; so I may be able to study alongside with her. :)

    As for my beginning ngondro, my friend and guide does some translations and projects for Anyen Rinpoche, and has been relaying my progress in my "Ngondro's Ngondro" :) My friend tells me that he's quite pleased... So, Anyen Rinpoche will most likely be the lama that I take refuge in and begin ngondro with. (Longchen Nyingthig)
    However, he will be away for some time now until around June/July. So, I'll have plenty of time to be completely ready to begin ngondro.

    As for my debt, I'm planning to take out a loan so that I may pay it off with that, and have lower APR to handle... What you suggested; Karmadorje, is pretty good advice. I'll have to check into that more. :)

    Thanks everyone :)
  • FoibleFullFoibleFull Canada Veteran
    edited December 2010
    I have very mixed feelings about any group whose teacher violated the Five Precepts so flagrantly. And also for any group that charges so much money to take a set of courses, especially since they only rent their space.

    Yet the teachings of Pema Chodron have done more for my mastery (which is still kindergarten!) than any other Buddhist source. And my sister says the same. Important to note:
    - My teacher is a Tibetan who entered the Dalai Lama's monastery at age 12. I take weekly classes from him.
    - My sister has been fortunate to have two Tulku's as teachers (one died and the other returned to India), and now has an Abbott at a Tibetan Gelug monastery as her teacher.
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